Treatment Clinical Trials for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-9 of 9
  • A Study of the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Venetoclax in Pediatric and Young Adult Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Malignancies

    An open-label, global, multi-center study to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of venetoclax monotherapy, to determine the dose limiting toxicity (DLT) and the recommended Phase 2 dose (RPTD), and to assess the preliminary efficacy of venetoclax in pediatric and young adult participants with relapsed or refractory malignancies.
    Location: 9 locations

  • CD5.CAR / 28 T Cells, Cyclophosphamide, and Fludarabine in Treating Participants with Recurrent T-Cell Malignancies Expressing the CD5 Antigen

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of autologous CD5-specific CAR-28 zeta CAR T-cells (CD5.CAR / 28 T cells) when given together with cyclophosphamide and fludarabine in treating participants with T-cell cancers expressing the CD5 antigen that that has come back. T cells, also called T lymphocytes, are special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells including tumor cells. The antibody used in this study is called anti-CD5, which sticks to T-cell leukemia or lymphoma cells because of a substance on the outside of these cells called CD5. The T cells will also contain a substance called CD28 which may help stimulate the T cells and may make them last longer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving CD5.CAR / 28 T cells with cyclophosphamide and fludarabine may work better in treating participants with T-cell malignancies expressing the CD5 antigen.
    Location: 3 locations

  • CD19-CAR T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients with CD19-Positive Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of CD19-CAR T-cell immunotherapy and how well it works in treating patients with CD19-positive leukemia. Biological therapies, such as CD19-CAR T-cell immunotherapy, use substances made from living organisms that may attack specific tumor cells and stop them from growing or kill them.
    Location: 3 locations

  • T-allo10 Cell Infusion before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Blood Cancer

    This phase I trial studies side effects and best dose of T-allo10 cells and to see how well they work when given before donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with blood cancer that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft versus host disease). Giving T-allo10 cells before the transplant may help prevent this from happening. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Giving T-allo10 cells before donor stem cell transplant may work better in treating patients with blood cancer that has come back or dose not respond to treatment.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Partially HLA-Mismatched Related Donor Stem Cell Transplant Using Killer Immunoglobulin Receptor and Human Leukocyte Antigen Based Donor Selection in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well partially human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched related donor stem cell transplant using killer immunoglobulin receptor or HLA based donor selection works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Partially mismatched donor stem cells may reduce the risk of cancer recurring after transplant.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Blinatumomab and T Cell Depleted Donor Blood Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Hematologic Malignancy after a Previous Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well blinatumomab and T cell depleted donor blood cell transplant work in treating children and young adults with hematologic cancer that has not responded or has come back after a previous transplant. White blood cells from donors may be able to kill cancer cells in patients with hematologic cancer. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Removing the T cells from the donor cells before the transplant may stop this from happening. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving blinatumomab after a blood cell transplant may destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: Saint Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • CD34+ Stem Cell Selection in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Younger Patients with Malignant Disease Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies cluster of differentiation 34 positive (CD34+) stem cell selection in preventing graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) in younger patients with malignant disease undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Selected CD34+ stem cell may help stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells and prevent GVHD.
    Location: NYP / Columbia University Medical Center / Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Donor Progenitor Cell and Natural Kill Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well donor progenitor cell and natural killer cell transplant works in treating younger patients with cancers of the blood that are at high risk of coming back or spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient’s immune system from rejecting the donor’s stem cells. When certain stem cells and natural killer cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient’s bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body’s normal cells. Removing the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Saint Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Combination Chemotherapy with or without Rituximab in Treating Younger Patients with Stage III-IV Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or B-Cell Acute Leukemia

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy with or without rituximab works in treating younger patients with stage III-IV non-Hodgkin lymphoma or B-cell acute leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibody, such as rituximab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy together with rituximab is more effective in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma or B-cell acute leukemia.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov