Treatment Clinical Trials for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for chronic myelogenous leukemia (cml) treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 77
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  • Testing the Addition of Ruxolitinib to the Usual Treatment (Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors) for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well ruxolitinib phosphate, and bosutnib, dasatinib, or nilotinib, work in treating patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Chronic myeloid leukemia cells produce a protein called BCR-ABL. The BCR-ABL protein helps chronic myeloid leukemia cells to grow and divide. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as bosutinib, dasatinib, and nilotinib, stop the BCR-ABL protein from working, which helps to reduce the amount of chronic myeloid leukemia cells in the body. Ruxolitinib is a different type of drug that helps to stop the body from making substances called growth factors. Chronic myeloid leukemia cells need growth factors to grow and divide. The addition of ruxolitinib to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor may or may not help reduce the amount of chronic myeloid leukemia cells in the body.
    Location: 507 locations

  • Testing Pembrolizumab with Existing Cancer Therapy in Patients with Evidence of Residual Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and dasatinib, imatinib mesylate, nilotinib, or bosutinib work in treating patients with chronic myeloid leukemia and persistent detection of minimal residual disease, defined as the levels of a gene product called bcr-abl in the blood. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Dasatinib, imatinib mesylate, nilotinib, and bosutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab and dasatinib, imatinib mesylate, nilotinib, or bosutinib may work better in treating patients with chronic myeloid leukemia compared to dasatinib, imatinib mesylate, nilotinib, or bosutinib alone.
    Location: 233 locations

  • Stopping Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Affecting Treatment-Free Remission in Patients with Chronic Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how stopping tyrosine kinase inhibitors will affect treatment-free remission in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase. When the level of disease is very low, it's called molecular remission. TKIs are a type of medication that help keep this level low. However, after being in molecular remission for a specific amount of time, it may not be necessary to take tyrosine kinase inhibitors. It is not yet known whether stopping tyrosine kinase inhibitors will help patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase continue or re-achieve molecular remission.
    Location: 57 locations

  • Study of IMGN632 in Patients With Relapse / Refractory AML, BPDCN, ALL, Other CD123+ Hem Malignancies

    This is an open-label, multi-center, Phase 1 / 2 study to determine the MTD and assess the safety, tolerability, PK, immunogenicity, and preliminary anti-leukemia activity of IMGN632 when administered as monotherapy to patients with CD123+ disease. The study is currently enrolling eligible AML, BPDCN and ALL patients.
    Location: 7 locations

  • A Phase I Study of Oral ABL001 in Patients With CML or Ph+ ALL

    The design of a phase I, open label, dose finding study was chosen in order to establish a safe and tolerated dose of single agent ABL001 in CML and Ph+ ALL patients who are relapsed or refractory to or are intolerant of TKIs, and of ABL001+Nilotinib, ABL001+Imatinib and ABL001+Dasatinib in Ph positive CML patients who are relapsed or refractory to TKIs.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics and Activity of K0706

    Phase 1 / 2 study to determine safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and activity of K0706
    Location: 8 locations

  • Study of HQP1351 in Subjects With Refractory Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    A multi-center, open-label, randomized, phase Ib study to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK) of HQP1351 and to determine the recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) of HQP1351 in subjects with CML CP and AP, who have experienced resistance or intolerance to at least two tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib, bosutinib or ponatinib.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Ruxolitinib and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Recurrent Chronic Phase-Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well ruxolitinib and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), including imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib or bosutinib, work in treating patients who are attempting to stop TKI medications for a second time for chronic phase-chronic myeloid leukemia that has come back (recurrent). Ruxolitinib and imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib or bosutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. The purpose of this trial is to see if adding ruxolitinib to imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib or bosutinib works better in prolonging treatment-free remission in patients with chronic phase-chronic myeloid leukemia.
    Location: 3 locations

  • ABL001, Dasatinib, and Prednisone in Treating Patients with BCR-ABL Positive B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ABL001 when given together with dasatinib and prednisone in treating patients with BCR-ABL positive B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or chronic myeloid leukemia. ABL001 and dasatinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Prednisone may help to lessen inflammation and lower the body's immune response. Giving ABL001, dasatinib, and prednisone may work better in treating patients with BCR-ABL positive B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or chronic myeloid leukemia.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Study of PTX-200 (Triciribine) Plus Cytarabine in Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia

    A phase I-II open label study of PTX-200 in combination with cytarabine in the treatment of relapsed or refractory acute leukemia.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Reduced Intensity Chemotherapy and Total Body Irradiation before TCR-alpha / beta+ T-lymphocytes Donor Transplant in Treating Participants with High-Risk Myeloid Diseases

    This phase I trial studies how well reduced intensity chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before allogeneic TCR alpha / beta-positive T-lymphocyte-depleted peripheral blood stem cells (TCR-alpha / beta+ T-lymphocytes donor transplant) works in treating participants with high-risk myeloid diseases. Giving chemotherapy such as anti-thymocyte globulin and fludarabine phosphate, as well as total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the participant's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the participant they may help the participant's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Removing the T cells from the donor cells before the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Multi-institutional Prospective Research of Expanded Multi-antigen Specifically Oriented Lymphocytes for the Treatment of VEry High Risk Hematopoietic Malignancies

    This Phase I dose-escalation trial is designed to evaluate the safety of administering rapidly -generated tumor multi-antigen associated -specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, to HSCT recipients (Arm A) or future HSCT recipients (Arm B) for the treatment of high-risk or relapsed or refractory hematopoietic malignancies. In addition to safety, this study will also evaluate if event-free survival (EFS) is improved with TAA-T administration at six months after HSCT for patients with high risk AML and MDS (Arm C).
    Location: 2 locations

  • Study of Efficacy and Safety of Asciminib in Combination With Imatinib in Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Chronic Phase (CML-CP)

    To evaluate efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetic profile of asciminib 40mg+imatinib or asciminib 60mg+imatinib versus continued imatinib and versus nilotinib in pre-treated patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP)
    Location: 2 locations

  • Donor Partial Immune Cell Depletion for the Treatment of Hematologic Malignancies

    This trial studies how well donor stem cell transplantation with alpha / beta T cell and B cell depletion (partial Immune Cell Depletion) works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Alpha / beta T cell and B cell depletion is a new method of cell processing for stem cell transplants with an unrelated donor or partially matched related donor using the CliniMACS device. There is a higher rate of complications using cells from an unrelated or partially matched related donor. T cells within the donor cells may cause a complication called graft versus host disease, where the transplanted cells from a donor can attack the body's normal cells. Donated B cells can sometimes be infected with a virus (Epstein Bar Virus or EBV) which may result in the development of enlarged lymph nodes (lymphoproliferative disorder). Alpha / beta T cell and B cell depletion may reduce some of the complications of the transplant and decrease the time it takes for the new stem cells to grow in the body.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Decitabine, Venetoclax, and Ponatinib for the Treatment of Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myeloid Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well the combination of decitabine, venetoclax, and ponatinib work for the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute myeloid leukemia or myeloid blast phase chronic myelogenous leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy such as decitabine and venetoclax work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Ponatinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving decitabine, venetoclax, and ponatinib may help to control Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute myeloid leukemia or myeloid blast phase chronic myelogenous leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • US Study of UM171-Expanded CB in Patients With High Risk Leukemia / Myelodysplasia

    Cord blood (CB) transplants are an option for patients lacking an HLA identical donor but are hampered by low cell dose, prolonged aplasia and high transplant related mortality. UM171, a novel and potent agonist of hematopoietic stem cell self renewal could solve this major limitation, allowing for CB's important qualities as lower risk of chronic GVHD and relapse to prevail. In a previous trial (NCT02668315), the CB expansion protocol using the ECT-001-CB technology (UM171 molecule) has proven to be technically feasible and safe. UM171 expanded CB was associated with a median neutrophil recovery at day (D)+18 post transplant. Amongst 22 patients who received a single UM171 CB transplant with a median follow-up of 18 months, risk of TRM (5%) and grade 3-4 acute GVHD (10%) were low. There was no moderate-severe chronic GVHD. Thus, overall and progression free survival at 12 months were impressive at 90% and 74%, respectively. The UM171 expansion protocol allowed access to smaller, better HLA matched CBs as >80% of patients received a 6-7 / 8 HLA matched CB. Interestingly there were patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies and multiple comorbidities (5 patients who had already failed an allogeneic transplant and 5 patients with refractory / relapsed acute leukemia / aggressive lymphoma). Despite this high risk population, progression was 20% at 12 months. This new study seeks to test a similar strategy in a group of patients with high risk acute leukemia / myelodysplasia.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Giving Chemotherapy and rATG for a Shortened Amount of Time before a Donor Stem Cell Transplantation for the Treatment of Patients with Blood Cancers

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of giving chemotherapy and a drug called rATG for a shorter period of time before a donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with blood cancers. This study will also look at whether the condensed regimen can shorten hospitalization following the transplantation. A chemotherapy regimen with the drugs busulfan, melphalan, and fludarabine may kill cancer cells in the body, making room in the bone marrow for new blood stem cells to grow and reducing the chance of transplanted cell rejection. The chemotherapy drugs work to interrupt the DNA (genetic information) in the cancer cells, stopping the cells from dividing and causing them to die. rATG targets and deactivates white blood cells called T cells that survive the chemotherapy. T cells may see the donor’s cells as foreign, causing a serious condition called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). rATG helps prevent the donor stem cells from being rejected. Giving chemotherapy and rATG for a shorter period of time before a donor stem cell transplantation may help in reducing the number of side effects and shortening hospitalization following the transplantation.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Serial Measurements of Molecular and Architectural Responses to Therapy (SMMART) PRIME Trial

    This phase Ib trial determines if samples from a patient’s cancer can be tested to find combinations of drugs that provide clinical benefit for the kind of cancer the patient has. This study is also being done to understand why cancer drugs can stop working and how different cancers in different people respond to different types of therapy.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Donor T Cell Depletion in Preventing Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Blood Cancer Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies donor T cell depletion in preventing graft versus host disease (GVHD) in patients with blood cancer undergoing a donor stem cell transplant. Donor stem cell transplants, especially in the mismatched donor setting, are associated with increased risk for GVHD, a condition where the transplanted donor white blood cells attack your body’s normal tissues. Using a cell separation device may remove a subset of white blood cells (called alpha / beta T cells) from the donor product before the product is transplanted. This study is being done to assess whether this manipulation (called selective T cell depletion) will reduce the risk of GVHD and improve transplant outcome.
    Location: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Cytokine-Treated Veto Cells in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies following Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies how well cytokine-treated veto cells work in treating patients with hematologic malignancies following stem cell transplant. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Cytokine-treated veto cells may help the transplanted donor cells to develop and grow in recipients without causing graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD - when transplanted donor tissue attacks the tissues of the recipient's body).
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • T Cells (EAGD T-Cells) after Stem Cell Transplantation and Post-transplant Cyclophospamide for the Treatment of Blood Cancers

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of T cells (EAGD T-cells) after stem cell transplantation and post-transplant cyclophosphamide for the treatment of patients with blood cancer. Gamma delta T-cells are part of patient's body’s natural immune system, and they act to prevent or stop the development of a tumor. A donor, who shares similarities to patient's genes, provides blood that is processed using special equipment. This equipment, used by the laboratory, removes some cell types leaving the special cells that may have an impact on helping patients' own body’s blood cells kill their cancer cells. The processed cells are called EAGD T-cells. Giving EAGD T-cells after stem cell transplant and standard of care treatment, may reduce the risk of patient’s body rejecting or fighting off blood cells and bone marrow received from a donor (graft versus host disease) and prevent blood cancer from coming back.
    Location: University of Kansas Clinical Research Center, Fairway, Kansas

  • Cyclophosphamide, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total Body Radiation, before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Participants with Blood Disorders and Blood Cancers

    This phase III trial studies how well cyclophosphamide, fludarabine phosphate, and total body radiation before donor stem cell transplant work in treating participants with blood disorders and blood cancers. Giving chemotherapy such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine phosphate and total body radiation before a stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow. When the healthy cells from a donor are infused into the participant, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, and platelets. The donated cells may also replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire

  • Tocilizumab in Improving Graft-Versus-Host Disease and Early Side Effects in Patients with Blood Cancers Undergoing Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well tocilizumab works in improving graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and early side effects in patients with blood cancers undergoing umbilical cord blood transplant. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before an umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called GVHD). Giving tocilizumab in addition to the standard approach for GVHD prevention after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well fludarabine phosphate, cyclophosphamide, total body irradiation, and donor stem cell transplant work in treating patients with blood cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well donor stem cell transplant works in treating patients with blood cancer. Giving total-body irradiation before a donor transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota


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