Treatment Clinical Trials for Esophageal Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for esophageal cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-75 of 100

  • Ulixertinib and Hydroxychloroquine for the Treatment of Advanced MAPK-Mutated Gastrointestinal Cancers

    This phase I trial identifies side effects, activity, and best dose of ulixertinib when given together with hydroxychloroquine in treating patients with MAPK gene mutated gastrointestinal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). MAP kinase (MAPK) gene products are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation and differentiation. Ulixertinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the MAPK gene products needed for cell growth. Hydroxychloroquine is used to decrease the body's immune response and may result in tumor cell death. Giving ulixertinib and hydroxychloroquine may shrink tumors in patients with gastrointestinal cancer.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Use of Trifluridine / Tipiracil and Oxaliplatin as Induction Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Resectable Esophageal or Gastroesophageal Junction (GEJ) Adenocarcinoma

    This phase II trial studies how well trifluridine / tipiracil and oxaliplatin work as the first line of treatment (induction) in treating patients with esophageal or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma that can be removed by surgery (resectable). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as trifluridine / tipiracil and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Pembrolizumab for the Treatment of Resectable Early Stage Gastroesophageal or Gastic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab works in treating patients with early stage gastroesophageal or Gastric cancer that can be removed by surgery (resectable). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Accelerated Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Unresectable Esophageal or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    This phase I trial studies side effects and best dose of accelerated hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy when given together with combination chemotherapy for the treatment of esophageal or gastroesophageal junction cancer that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivers higher doses of radiation therapy over a shorter period of time and may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving a shortened course of radiation using higher radiation doses with chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • A First-in-Human, Phase 1 Study of JAB-3312 in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    This is a Phase 1, first-in-human, open-label dose-escalation study to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and / or recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) and assess the DLT of JAB-3312. It is anticipated that approximately 24 subjects will be enrolled in the dose-escalation phase of the study. JAB-3312 will be administered orally once daily (QD) in 21-day treatment cycles.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • A Study of Ladiratuzumab Vedotin in Advanced Solid Tumors

    This trial will study ladiratuzumab vedotin (LV) to find out if it works to treat different types of solid tumors. It will also find out what side effects may occur. A side effect is anything the drug does besides treating cancer.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • FLOT and Chemoradiation before Surgery for the Treatment of Resectable Esophageal or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well FLOT (fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin, and docetaxel) and chemoradiation before surgery work in treating patients with esophageal or gastroesophageal junction cancer that can be removed by surgery (resectable). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin, docetaxel, paclitaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. FLOT and chemoradiation before surgery may be an effective treatment for patients with esophageal or gastroesophageal junction cancer.
    Location: University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado

  • Phase II Study of Short Course FOLFOX Chemotherapy With Either Nivolumab or Nivolumab + Radiation in the First Line Treatment of Metastatic or Unresectable Gastroesophageal Cancers (BMS Protocol CA209-76L)

    This is a randomized phase II study examining nivolumab alone versus radiation therapy with nivolumab in subjects who did not have disease progression to initial therapy with the combination of FOLFOX and Nivolumab.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Rucaparib and Ramucirumab with or without Nivolumab for the Treatment of Stage III-IV Gastric, Esophageal, or Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose of rucaparib and how well rucaparib, ramucirumab with or without nivolumab work in treating patients with stage III-IV gastric, esophageal, or esophageal adenocarcinoma. Rucaparib may help block a protein that helps repair deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (genetic makeup) when it becomes damaged. This action may keep cancer cells from repairing their damaged DNA and causing them to die. Ramucirumab and nivolumab together may help to block the blood supply to the tumor and help the immune system discover and attack cancer cells. Giving rucaparib, ramucirumab, and nivolumab may provide a better treatment for gastric, esophageal, and esophageal adenocarcinoma compared to rucaparib and ramucirumab alone.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Safety and Efficacy of KY1044 and Atezolizumab in Advanced Cancer

    A Phase 1 / 2, open label, multi-center study to evaluate the safety, efficacy and tolerability of KY1044 as single agent and in combination with anti-PD-L1 (atezolizumab) in adult patients with selected advanced malignancies, who are ineligible for or there are no available therapies known to confer a clinical benefit for their disease, or they have exhausted all such available options in each indication and therefore will be patients for whom a clinical trial is appropriate.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Gevokizumab With Standard of Care Anti-cancer Therapies for Metastatic Colorectal, Gastroesophageal, and Renal Cancers

    This study will determine the pharmacodynamically-active dose of gevokizumab and the tolerable dose and preliminary efficacy of gevokizumab in combination with the standard of care anti-cancer therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, metastatic gastroesophageal cancer and metastatic renal cell carcinoma.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Atezolizumab, Oxaliplatin, and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients with Esophageal or Gastroesophageal Cancer

    This early phase I trial studies how well atezolizumab in combination with oxaliplatin and fluorouracil works in treating patients with esophageal or gastroesophageal cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving atezolizumab, oxaliplatin, and fluorouracil may work better in treating patients with esophageal or gastroesophageal cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • A Safety and Tolerability Study of INCAGN02390 in Select Advanced Malignancies

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety, tolerability, and preliminary efficacy of INCAGN02390 in participants with select advanced malignancies.
    Location: Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, New Jersey

  • Study of ADCT-301 in Patients With Selected Advanced Solid Tumors

    This study evaluates ADCT-301 in patients with Selected Advanced Solid Tumors. Patients will participate in a Treatment Period with 3-week cycles and a Follow-up Period every 12 weeks for up to 1 year after treatment discontinuation.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Oral TrkA Inhibitor VMD-928 for Treatment of Advanced Adult Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    This is a multicenter, open-label, Phase 1 study of orally administered VMD-928 in adult subjects with advanced solid tumors or lymphoma that have progressed or are non responsive to available therapies and for which no standard or available curative therapy exists
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Cabozantinib and Durvalumab in Treating Patients with Stage III-IV Gastroesophageal Cancer and Other Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of cabozantinib when given together with durvalumab in treating patients with stage III-IV gastroesophageal cancer and other gastrointestinal malignancies. Cabozantinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cabozantinib and durvalumab may work better in treating patients with gastroesophageal cancer and other gastrointestinal malignancies compared to cabozantinib or durvalumab alone.
    Location: University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, Kansas

  • A Safety and Tolerability Study of INCAGN02385 in Select Advanced Malignancies

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety, tolerability, and preliminary efficacy of INCAGN02385 in participants with advanced malignancies.
    Location: Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, New Jersey

  • A First in Human, Dose Escalation Study of JAB-3068 (SHP2 Inhibitor) in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    This is a phase 1, multi-center, dose escalation, open-label study to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary evidence of antitumor activity of JAB-3068 in adult patients with advanced solid.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Avelumab and Chemoradiation in Treating Patients with Stage II-III Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of avelumab when given together with chemoradiation in treating patients with stage II-III esophageal and gastroesophageal junction cancer that can be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. Giving avelumab and chemoradiation may work better in treating patients with esophageal cancer.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Proton Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Stage II or III Esophageal Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well proton beam radiation therapy works in treating patients with stage II or III esophageal cancer. Proton beam radiation therapy uses high energy protons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors while causing less damage to healthy tissues and organs.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • M7824 in Subjects With HPV Associated Malignancies

    Background: In the United States, each year there are more than 30,000 cases of human papillomavirus (HPV) associated cancers. Some of these cancers are often incurable and are not improved by standard therapies. Researchers want to see if a new drug M7824, which targets and blocks a pathway that prevents the immune system from effectively fighting the cancer can shrink tumors in people with some HPV cancers. Objectives: To see if the drug M7824 causes tumors to shrink. Eligibility: Adults age 18 and older who have a cancer associated with HPV infection. Design: Participants will be screened with medical history and physical exam. They will review their symptoms and how they perform normal activities. They will have body scans. They will give blood and urine samples. They will have a sample of their tumor tissue taken if one is not available. Participants will have an electrocardiogram to evaluate their heart. Then they will get the study drug through a thin tube in an arm vein. Participants will get the drug every 2 weeks for 26 times (1 year). This is 1 course. After the course, participants will be monitored but will not take the study drug. If their condition gets worse, they will start another course with the drug. This process can be repeated as many times as needed. Treatment will stop if the participant has bad side effects or the drug stops working. Throughout the study, participants will repeat some or all the screening tests. After participants stop taking the drug, they will have a follow-up visit and repeat some screening tests. They will get periodic follow-up phone calls. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Unresectable Gastroesophageal Adenocarcinoma

    This early phase I trial studies how well pembrolizumab works in treating patients with gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma that has spread to other places or cannot be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Basket Study to Evaluate the Therapeutic Activity of RO6874281 as a Combination Therapy in Participants With Advanced and / or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    This is an open-label, multicenter, basket trial Phase II study to evaluate the antitumor activity of RO6874281 in combination with atezolizumab in participants with advanced and / or metastatic solid tumors. Currently the focus is on patients with Head and Neck, oesophageal and cervical cancers with confirmed squamous cell carcinoma histology type.
    Location: Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, New Jersey

  • Pembrolizumab, Oxaliplatin, Capecitabine as First Line Treatment for Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Esophagus or Stomach Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine work as first-line treatment in treating patients with esophagus or stomach cancer that has come back (recurrent) or spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine may work better in treating patients with esophagus or stomach cancer.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Endoesophageal Brachytherapy Using a 6-Channel Balloon Repositioning, Multichannel Applicator in Treating Participants with Esophageal Carcinoma

    This trial studies how well endoesophageal brachytherapy using a 6-channel balloon repositioning, multichannel applicator works in treating in participants with esophageal carcinoma. A 6-channel balloon repositioning, multichannel applicator may work by making the dose more evenly distributed and reducing "hot spots" of radiation (doses above the prescription dose) in the esophageal wall during radiation therapy.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio