Treatment Clinical Trials for Esophageal Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for esophageal cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-75 of 82

  • Trial of mFOLFOX6 + Trastuzumab + Avelumab in Gastric and Esophageal Adenocarcinomas

    This study will be a prospective, open-label, single arm, multi-center phase 2 clinical trial of mFOLFOX6 + trastuzumab + avelumab in first-line, metastatic, HER2-amplified gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas. The primary objective of this study is to estimate the best objective response rate (CR or PR, ORR) in these patients within 24 weeks by RECIST 1.1 criteria. Secondary objectives include; estimating PFS by both RECIST 1.1 and iRECIST criteria, estimating OS, estimating the disease control rate (DCR) at 24 weeks by RECIST 1.1 and iRECIST, and characterizing the safety issues associated with this regimen.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Safety and Tolerability Study of INCAGN02390 in Select Advanced Malignancies

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety, tolerability, and preliminary efficacy of INCAGN02390 in participants with select advanced malignancies.
    Location: Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, New Jersey

  • Study of BAY1834942 in Patients With Solid Tumors

    This is an open-label, Phase 1, first-in-human, dose escalation and expansion study designed to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and tumor response profile of the anti-Carcinoembryonic-antigen-related-cell-adhesion-molecule-6 (CEACAM6) antibody BAY1834942 in patients with advanced solid tumors known to have a prevalence for CEACAM6 expression. The study consists of dose escalation and a tumor type-specific expansion.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Cabozantinib S-malate and Durvalumab in Treating Patients with Stage III-IV Gastroesophageal Cancer and Other Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of cabozantinib S-malate when given together with durvalumab in treating patients with stage III-IV gastroesophageal cancer and other gastrointestinal malignancies. Cabozantinib S-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cabozantinib S-malate and durvalumab may work better in treating patients with gastroesophageal cancer and other gastrointestinal malignancies compared to cabozantinib or durvalumab alone.
    Location: University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, Kansas

  • A Safety and Tolerability Study of INCAGN02385 in Select Advanced Malignancies

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety, tolerability, and preliminary efficacy of INCAGN02385 in participants with advanced malignancies.
    Location: Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, New Jersey

  • A First in Human, Dose Escalation Study of JAB-3068 (SHP2 Inhibitor) in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    This is a phase 1, multi-center, dose escalation, open-label study to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary evidence of antitumor activity of JAB-3068 in adult patients with advanced solid.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Avelumab and Chemoradiation in Treating Patients with Stage II-III Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of avelumab when given together with chemoradiation in treating patients with stage II-III esophageal and gastroesophageal junction cancer that can be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. Giving avelumab and chemoradiation may work better in treating patients with esophageal cancer.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Proton Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Stage II or III Esophageal Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well proton beam radiation therapy works in treating patients with stage II or III esophageal cancer. Proton beam radiation therapy uses high energy protons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors while causing less damage to healthy tissues and organs.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • A Study of Tislelizumab (BGB-A317) Versus Chemotherapy as Second Line Treatment in Patients With Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of BGB-A317 as second line treatment in patients with advanced unresectable / metastatic ESCC that has progressed during or after first line therapy.
    Location: USC / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • M7824 in Subjects With HPV Associated Malignancies

    Background: In the United States, each year there are more than 30,000 cases of human papillomavirus (HPV) associated cancers. Some of these cancers are often incurable and are not improved by standard therapies. Researchers want to see if a new drug M7824, which targets and blocks a pathway that prevents the immune system from effectively fighting the cancer can shrink tumors in people with some HPV cancers. Objectives: To see if the drug M7824 causes tumors to shrink. Eligibility: Adults age 18 and older who have a cancer associated with HPV infection. Design: Participants will be screened with medical history and physical exam. They will review their symptoms and how they perform normal activities. They will have body scans. They will give blood and urine samples. They will have a sample of their tumor tissue taken if one is not available. Participants will have an electrocardiogram to evaluate their heart. Then they will get the study drug through a thin tube in an arm vein. Participants will get the drug every 2 weeks for 26 times (1 year). This is 1 course. After the course, participants will be monitored but will not take the study drug. If their condition gets worse, they will start another course with the drug. This process can be repeated as many times as needed. Treatment will stop if the participant has bad side effects or the drug stops working. Throughout the study, participants will repeat some or all the screening tests. After participants stop taking the drug, they will have a follow-up visit and repeat some screening tests. They will get periodic follow-up phone calls. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Pembrolizumab, Oxaliplatin, Capecitabine as First Line Treatment for Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Esophagus or Stomach Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine work as first-line treatment in treating patients with esophagus or stomach cancer that has come back or spread to other places in the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine may work better in treating patients with esophagus or stomach cancer.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Endoesophageal Brachytherapy Using a 6-Channel Balloon Repositioning, Multichannel Applicator in Treating Participants with Esophageal Carcinoma

    This trial studies how well endoesophageal brachytherapy using a 6-channel balloon repositioning, multichannel applicator works in treating in participants with esophageal carcinoma. A 6-channel balloon repositioning, multichannel applicator may work by making the dose more evenly distributed and reducing "hot spots" of radiation (doses above the prescription dose) in the esophageal wall during radiation therapy.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Oral Decitabine and Tetrahydrouridine as Epigenetic Priming for, Pembrolizumab-Mediated Immune Checkpoint Blockade in Patients With Inoperable, or Unresectable Locally Advanced or Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers and Esophageal Carcinomas

    Background: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Most people with lung cancer are already in the advanced stages of the disease by the time they see a doctor. Researchers want to see if combining an approved drug with two new drugs can help. Objective: To study if tetrahydrouridine-decitabine (THU-DAC) with pembrolizumab is safe and effective in people with non-small cell lung cancer that cannot be removed by surgery. Eligibility: People 18 years and older who have NSCLC that cannot be removed by surgery Design: Participants will be screened with - Medical history - Physical exam - Blood and urine tests - Tests of heart and lung function They may have a small tumor sample taken (biopsy). They may have tumor scans. Before starting treatment, participants will repeat the screening tests. They will also give a stool sample. The study will be done in 3-week cycles for up to 6 cycles. - Participants will take the 2 study drugs by mouth 3-5 days a week. - Participants will get pembrolizumab in a vein for 30 minutes 1 day each cycle. Participants will keep a study medication diary. During cycle 1, participants will have blood taken multiple times on days 1 and 2. Every 3 cycles, participants will repeat screening tests. Participants will have a mandatory tumor biopsy. When they finish treatment, participants will have a physical exam and blood tests.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Study of Crenolanib With Ramucirumab and Paclitaxel for Advanced Esophagogastric Adenocarcinoma

    This is a single-arm phase I / Ib study of crenolanib combined with ramucirumab / paclitaxel as second line therapy for patients with advanced / metastatic adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, GEJ or stomach. Patients will be enrolled in two phases; dose escalation phase and dose expansion phase.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • APX005M, Chemotherapy, and Radiation Therapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Esophageal Cancer or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer that Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This pilot phase II trial studies the side effects of CD40 agonistic monoclonal antibody APX005M (APX005M), chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, and to see how well they work when given before surgery in treating patients with esophageal cancer or gastroesophageal cancer that can be removed by surgery. APX005M is intended to stimulate the body’s own immune system so that the immune cells can more effectively invade and destroy the tumor, adding to the benefits of the chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving APX005M, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • Chemotherapy with or without Radiation or Surgery in Treating Participants with Oligometastatic Esophageal or Gastric Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy with or without radiation or surgery works in treating participants with esophageal or gastric cancer that has spread to less than 3 places in the body (oligometastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Surgery, such as complete surgical resection, may stop the spread of tumor cells by surgically removing organs or tumors. Giving chemotherapy with radiation or surgery may work better than chemotherapy alone in treating participants with oligometastatic esophageal or gastric cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Vascular-Targeted Photodynamic Therapy with Padeliporfin in Treating Dysphagia in Patients with Stage IV Esophageal Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy with padeliporfin in treating dysphagia in patients with stage IV esophageal cancer. Padeliporfin is a photosensitizing drug which stays in the blood vessels and becomes active when exposed to light. Vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy uses a laser to activate padeliporfin and may kill tumor cells and improve swallowing in patients with esophageal cancer.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Pulsed Low Dose Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy in Reducing the Rates of Severe Acute Esophagitis in Patients with Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Stage IB-IIIC Esophageal Cancer

    This phase I trial studies how well pulsed low dose radiation therapy and chemotherapy work in reducing the rates of severe acute esophagitis in patients with stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer and stage IB-IIIC esophageal cancer. Pulsed low dose rate radiation therapy uses short pulses to deliver low doses of radiation for extended times and may reduce the rate of severe acute esophagitis in patients with lung and esophageal cancer.
    Location: Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • A Study Evaluating MM-310 in Patients With Solid Tumors

    MM-310 is a liposomal formulation of a docetaxel prodrug that targets the EphA2 receptor on cancer cells. Docetaxel is an approved chemotherapeutic drug.This study is a Phase 1 open-label study of MM-310 in patients with solid tumors. In the first part of the study, MM-310 will be assessed as a monotherapy until a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is established. After an MTD of MM-310 as a monotherapy is established, an expansion cohort and MM-310 in combination with other therapies will be assessed.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Esophageal and Gastric Cancer

    This phase II clinical trial studies the side effects of pembrolizumab in treating patients with esophageal and gastric cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph node. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Ph1b Study of Oraxol in Comb. w. Ramucirumab in Patients w. Gastric, Gastro-esophageal, or Esophageal Cancers

    This is a nonrandomized, open-label, single group assignment, safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetic (PK) study to determine the MTD and optimal dosing regimen of Oraxol in combination with ramucirumab.
    Location: Cancer Therapy and Research Center at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas

  • Continuous 24h Intravenous Infusion of Mithramycin, an Inhibitor of Cancer Stem Cell Signaling, in People With Primary Thoracic Malignancies or Carcinomas, Sarcomas or Germ Cell Neoplasms With Pleuropulmonary Metastases

    Background: Mithramycin is a new cancer drug. In another study, people with chest cancer took the drug 6 hours a day for 7 straight days. Many of them had liver damage as a side effect. It was discovered that only people with certain genes got this side effect. Researchers want to test mithramycin in people who do not have those certain genes. Objectives: To find the highest safe dose of mithramycin that can be given to people with chest cancer who have certain genes over 24 hours instead of spread out over a longer period of time. To see if mithramycin given as a 24-hour infusion shrinks tumors. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older who have chest cancer that is not shrinking with known therapies, and whose genes will limit the chance of liver damage from mithramycin Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Blood and urine tests Lung and heart function tests X-rays or scans of their tumor Liver ultrasound Tumor biopsy Participants will be admitted to the hospital overnight. A small plastic tube (catheter) will be inserted in the arm or chest. They will get mithramycin through the catheter over about 24 hours. If they do not have bad side effects or their cancer does not worsen, they can repeat the treatment every 14 days. Participants will have multiple visits for each treatment cycle. These include repeats of certain screening tests. After stopping treatment, participants will have weekly visits until they recover from any side effects.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Combined Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of a combined vaccine therapy and to see how well it works in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). The cancer vaccine is made up of two proteins (that look like the tumor cells) mixed up with a special compound that may help train and boost the immune system to recognize and fight the tumor cells.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Study of NGM120 in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors and Pancreatic Cancer Using Combination Therapy

    Study of NGM120 in subjects with advanced solid tumors and pancreatic cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Gevokizumab With Standard of Care Anti-cancer Therapies for Metastatic Colorectal, Gastroesophageal, and Renal Cancers

    This study will determine the pharmacodynamically-active dose of gevokizumab and the tolerable dose and preliminary efficacy of gevokizumab in combination with the standard of care anti-cancer therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, metastatic gastroesophageal cancer and metastatic renal cell carcinoma.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California