Treatment Clinical Trials for Ewing Sarcoma

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for Ewing sarcoma treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-33 of 33

  • Study Of Palbociclib Combined With Chemotherapy In Pediatric Patients With Recurrent / Refractory Solid Tumors

    This study will evaluate palbociclib in combination with chemotherapy (temozolomide and irinotecan) in children, adolescents and young adults with recurrent or refractory solid tumors. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety of palbociclib in combination with chemotherapy in order to estimate the maximum tolerated dose. Pharmacokinetics and efficacy of palbociclib in combination with chemotherapy will be evaluated.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Study Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of Eribulin Mesilate in Combination With Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Children With Refractory or Recurrent Solid Tumors

    The Phase 1 part of the study is conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and Recommended Phase 2 Dose (RP2D) of eribulin mesilate in combination with irinotecan hydrochloride in pediatric participants with relapsed / refractory solid tumors {excluding central nervous system (CNS) tumors}. The Phase 2 part of the study is conducted to assess the objective response rate (ORR) and duration of response (DOR) of eribulin mesilate in combination with irinotecan hydrochloride in pediatric participants with relapsed / refractory rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcoma (NRSTS) and ewing sarcoma (EWS).
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Akt / ERK Inhibitor ONC201 in Treating Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumors That Are Locally Advanced, Metastatic, Recurrent, Refractory, or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well akt / ERK inhibitor ONC201 works in treating patients with neuroendocrine tumors that have spread to other places in the body, have come back, do not respond to treatment, or cannot be removed by surgery. Akt / ERK inhibitor ONC201 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Pbi-shRNA™ EWS / FLI1 Type 1 LPX in Subjects With Advanced Ewing's Sarcoma

    Ewing's sarcoma characterized by the t(11; 22) (q24; q12) translocation at several but prioritized breakpoint sites, resulting in the EWS / FLI1 fusion gene is the second most frequently diagnosed primary malignant bone tumor in the US with an annual incidence, from birth to age 20, of 2.9 cases per million population. The survival rate for patients with high-risk recurrent disease (relapse < 2 years) is < 10% at 5 years. Moreover, of patients who progress after second line treatment, eighty percent do not achieve a second complete response and of these patients < 10% survive one year. Refractory patients to both frontline and second line therapy have even worse prognosis. The EWS / FLI1 gene is well known as the driver gene of Ewing's sarcoma. We designed a novel pbi-shRNA™ EWS / FLI1 Type 1 LPX which has demonstrated sufficient specificity, safety and efficacy in animal testing to justify Phase I testing. Clinical safety (no ≥ grade 3 product related toxic effect) and target specific activity has been observed with other bi-shRNA products involving 147 cancer patients (698 separate dose administrations) (BB-Investigational New Drug (IND) 14205; BB-IND 14938). Moreover, safety has been observed with IV delivery of pbi-shRNA™ EWS / FLI1 Type 1 LPX in murine and swine testing via multidose IV administration.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Genetically Modified Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Zoledronic Acid in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed / Refractory Hematologic Malignancies or High Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of zoledronic acid given after genetically modified donor stem cell transplant in treating younger patients with hematologic malignancies or high risk tumors that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When healthy stem cells from a donor that have been genetically modified are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus after the transplant may stop this from happening. Giving zoledronic acid after the transplant may help strengthen the immune system and make the immune cells work better.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • PLX3397 in Children and Young Adults With Refractory Leukemias and Refractory Solid Tumors Including Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) Associated Plexiform Neurofibromas (PN)

    Background: - Some people with cancer have solid tumors. Others have refractory leukemia. This doesn t go away after treatment. Researchers want to see if a drug called PLX3397 can shrink tumors or stop them from growing. Objectives: - To find the highest safe dose and side effects of PLX3397. To see if it helps treat certain types of cancer. Eligibility: - People ages 3 22 with a solid tumor or leukemia that has returned or not responded to cancer therapies. - For Phase II, people ages 3 31 with a Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) Associated Plexiform Neurofibroma (PN) that cannot be removed with surgery. Design: - Participants will be screened with: - Medical history - Physical exam - Blood and urine tests - Heart tests - Scans or other tests of the tumor - Participants will take PLX3397 as a capsule once daily for a 28-day cycle. They can do this for up to 2 years. - During the study, participants will have many tests and procedures. They include repeats of the screening tests. Participants will keep a diary of symptoms. - Participants with solid tumors will have scans or x-rays. - Participants with NF1 PN will have MRI scans. - Participants with leukemia will have blood tests. They may have a bone marrow sample taken. - Some participants may have a biopsy. - When finished taking PLX3397, participants will have follow-up visits. They will repeat the screening tests and note side effects. - Phase II will follow the same procedures as Phase I above, but participants will also fill out questionnaires about their pain and quality of life.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well a donor bone marrow transplant works in treating patients with solid tumors that are likely to recur (come back) or spread. Giving low doses of chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells when they do not exactly match the patient's blood. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Universal Donor Natural Killer Cells and ALT-803 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Blood Cancer, Colon / Rectal Cancer, or Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of universal donor natural killer cells when given together with superagonist interleukin-15:interleukin-15 receptor alphaSu / Fc fusion complex ALT-803 (ALT-803) in treating patients with blood cancer, colon / rectal cancer, or soft tissue sarcoma that has come back after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Natural killer cells are a type of white blood cell that may kill tumor cells. ALT-803 may enhance natural killer cell survival and enable them to increase in number after infusion. Giving natural killer cells and ALT-803 may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio