Intraocular Melanoma Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for intraocular melanoma. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 28
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  • A Study of XmAb®22841 Monotherapy & in Combination w / Pembrolizumab in Subjects w / Selected Advanced Solid Tumors

    This is a Phase 1, multiple dose, ascending-dose escalation study and expansion study designed to define a maximum tolerated dose and / or recommended dose of XmAb22841 monotherapy and in combination with pembrolizumab; to assess safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and anti-tumor activity of XmAb22841 monotherapy and in combination with pembrolizumab in subjects with select advanced solid tumors.
    Location: 11 locations

  • IN10018 Monotherapy and Combination Therapy for Metastatic Melanoma

    This is a phase Ib, open label clinical study to evaluate the safety, tolerability, PK and antitumor activities of IN10018 as monotherapy and in combination with cobimetinib in subjects with metastatic uveal melanoma and NRAS-mutant metastatic melanoma.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Study of Safety and Tolerability of BCA101 Alone and in Combination With Pembrolizumab in Patients With EGFR-driven Advanced Solid Tumors

    The investigational drug to be studied in this protocol, BCA101, is a first-in-class compound that targets both EGFR with TGFβ. Based on preclinical data, this bifunctional antibody may exert synergistic activity in patients with EGFR-driven tumors.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Phase 2 Trial to Evaluate Safety and Efficacy of AU-011 Via Suprachoroidal Administration in Subjects With Primary Indeterminate Lesions and Small Choroidal Melanoma

    The primary objective is to assess safety and efficacy of AU-011 via suprachoroidal injection to treat primary indeterminate lesions and small choroidal melanoma.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Study of IDE196 in Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring GNAQ / 11 Mutations or PRKC Fusions

    This is a Phase 1 / 2, multi-center, open-label basket study designed to evaluate the safety and anti-tumor activity of IDE196 in patients with solid tumors harboring GNAQ or GNA11 (GNAQ / 11) mutations or PRKC fusions, including metastatic uveal melanoma (MUM), cutaneous melanoma, colorectal cancer, and other solid tumors. Phase 1 (dose escalation - monotherapy) will assess safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of IDE196 via standard dose escalation scheme and determine the recommended Phase 2 dose. Safety and anti-tumor activity will be assessed in the Phase 2 (dose expansion) part of the study. Phase 1 Tablet and Food Effect Pharmacokinetic (PK) Substudy will assess the PK profile of IDE196 tablet and evaluate the effects of food on the PK profile of IDE196 tablet Phase 1 (dose escalation - binimetib combination) will assess safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of IDE196 and binimetinib via standard dose escalation scheme and determine the recommended Phase 2 dose. Safety and anti-tumor activity will be assessed in the Phase 2 (dose expansion) part of the study. Phase 1 (dose escalation - crizotinib combination) will assess safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of IDE196 and crizotinib via standard dose escalation scheme and determine the recommended Phase 2 dose. Safety and anti-tumor activity will be assessed in the Phase 2 (dose expansion) part of the study.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Modified Immune Cells (C7R-GD2.CART) for the Treatment of GD2 Positive Relapsed or Refractory Solid Cancers

    This phase I trial is to find out the best dose, possible benefits and / or side effects of C7R-GD2.CART in treating patients with GD2 positive solid cancer that have come back (relapsed) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). The body has different ways of fighting infection and disease. Antibodies are types of proteins that protect the body from infectious diseases and possibly cancer. T cells, also called T lymphocytes, are special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells, including cells infected with viruses and tumor cells. Both antibodies and T cells have been used to treat patients with cancers. Putting a new gene into T cells may make them recognize cancer cells and kill them. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) was made from an antibody that recognizes GD2, a lipid found on almost all neuroblastoma cells (GD2-CAR). T cells need substances called cytokines to survive and the cells may not get enough cytokines after infusion into the body. Adding the gene C7R, gives the cells a constant supply of cytokine and helps them to survive for a longer period of time.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Study of PLX2853 in Advanced Malignancies.

    The purpose of this research study is to evaluate safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and preliminary efficacy of the investigational drug PLX2853 in subjects with advanced malignancies.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Modified Virus VSV-IFNbetaTYRP1 in Treating Patients with Stage III-IV Melanoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of a modified virus called VSV-IFNbetaTYRP1 in treating patients with stage III-IV melanoma. The vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has been altered to include two extra genes: human interferon beta (hIFNbeta), which may protect normal healthy cells from becoming infected with the virus, and TYRP1, which is expressed mainly in melanocytes (specialized skin cell that produces the protective skin-darkening pigment melanin) and melanoma tumor cells, and may trigger a strong immune response to kill the melanoma tumor cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Vaccine (6MHP) with or without CDX-1127 for the Treatment of Stage IIB-IV Melanoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and how well a vaccine (6MHP) with or without CDX-1127 work for the treatment of stage IIB-IV melanoma. Vaccines, such as 6MHP, may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as CDX-1127, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial is being done to see what effects 6MHP alone and in combination with CDX-1127 have on changes in the immune system.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Vorinostat in Treating Patients with Metastatic Melanoma of the Eye

    This phase II trial studies how well vorinostat works in treating patients with melanoma of the eye that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Vorinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Defactinib and VS-6766 for the Treatment of Patients with Metastatic Uveal Melanoma

    This phase II trial studies the effect of combining defactinib and VS-6766 in treating patients with uveal melanoma that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). The way cells communicate with one another (different cell signaling pathways) are overactive in uveal melanoma tumor cells. Giving defactinib together with VS-6766 may block pathways that are important for the growth of uveal melanoma cells, and may result in shrinkage or stabilization of the cancer and prolonged time to disease progression and survival.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Nivolumab and Relatlimab for the Treatment of Metastatic Uveal Melanoma

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab and relatlimab work in treating patients with uveal melanoma that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Nivolumab is thought to work by turning off the activity of PD-1 (programmed death-1), which is a protein found on T cells (a type of immune cell) that helps keep the body’s immune responses in check. When PD-1 is blocked, it is thought that the ability of T cells to kill cancer cells is increased. Relatlimab is thought to work by turning off the activity of LAG-3 (lymphocyte activation gene-3), which is a protein found on tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), a type of immune cell. When LAG-3 is blocked it is thought that TIL cell’s ability to attack cancer cells is increased, thereby reducing tumor growth. Giving nivolumab and relatlimab may increase the ability of the immune system to attack tumor cells in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma.
    Location: University of Miami Miller School of Medicine-Sylvester Cancer Center, Miami, Florida

  • Enhanced Melanoma Vaccine for the Treatment of Stage IIB-IV Melanoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the effects of an enhanced melanoma vaccine made with 6MHP, NeoAg-mBRAF, polyICLC, and CDX-1140 in treating patients with stage IIB-IV melanoma. The 6MHP and NeoAg-mBRAF are peptides (short pieces of proteins that are found in melanoma and sometimes normal cells). Vaccination with these peptides may help boost the immune system’s response against the peptides, which in turn may help the body fight off melanoma cells in your body. CDX-1140 is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. PolyICLC and CDX-1140 will be used as adjuvants, which means that they will be given with the peptides to help the body make an immune response against the peptides. Giving enhanced melanoma vaccine made with 6MHP, NeoAg-mBRAF, polyICLC, and CDX-1140 may help the body make an immune response against the melanoma vaccine which may lead to the destruction of tumor cells.
    Location: University of Virginia Cancer Center, Charlottesville, Virginia

  • Nivolumab plus Talazoparib for the Treatment of Unresectable or Metastatic Melanoma in Patients with Mutations in BRCA or BRCA-ness

    This phase II trial studies how well the use of nivolumab in combination with talazoparib works for the treatment of melanoma that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Patients must also have specific genetic changes (mutations), that can be targeted by drugs (BRCA or BRCA-ness). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. PARPs are proteins that help repair damage to DNA, the genetic material that serves as the body’s instruction book. Mutations in DNA can cause tumor cells to grow quickly and out of control, but PARP inhibitors such as Talazoparib may keep PARP from working, so tumor cells can’t repair themselves, and they stop growing. Giving nivolumab and talazoparib as a combination treatment may have a greater effect on melanoma that if each drug was given by itself.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Focused Ultrasound Ablation and PD-1 Antibody Blockade for the Treatment of Advanced Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of focused ultrasound ablation and how well it works with or without PD-1 antibody blockade (a type of immune infused therapy drug) in treating patients with solid tumors that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). PD-1 antibody blockade is a type of treatment that uses an antibody that has been created to bind to immune cells to enable them to fight off cancer more effectively. The Echopulse device is a computer driven system which guides a high intensity focused ultrasound beam (focused sound waves) to a targeted area of a tumor. Focused ultrasound ablation (FUSA) heats the targeted site which causes the cells to die. In addition to the focused ultrasound beam that can kill cells at its target, the Echopulse device also uses low energy ultrasound for imaging the tumor tissue and the tissue around the tumor to make sure that the focused ultrasound beam hit its target. Imiquimod is an immunomodulator, a drug that interacts with the immune system. Through boosting the immune system, imiquimod may help the body fight off cancer cells. The purpose of this trial is to figure out the safety and effectiveness of FUSA administration alone or with a PD-1 antibody and / or imiquimod.
    Location: University of Virginia Cancer Center, Charlottesville, Virginia

  • A Study to Evaluate Safety, Tolerability and Preliminary Efficacy of FP-1305 in Cancer Patients

    This is a first in human study to identify whether FP-1305 is suitable to use in humans. The previous pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that FP-1305 binds to a receptor known as CLEVER-1. CLEVER-1 has been shown to support tumour growth. No significant adverse events were witnessed in primates and the dose used will be 300 fold lower than the dose provided to primates which showed no toxicity. The patients with advanced melanoma, uveal melanoma, cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancer, ER+ breast, gastric, ovarian, pancreatic, colorectal, liver or anaplastic thyroid cancer who have exhausted all licenced therapeutic options will die due to their disease. Based on the investigator's existing data CLEVER-1 is expressed in these tumour types. Inhibition of CLEVER-1 with FP-1305 may have an anti-tumour effect in these patients.
    Location: Cancer Therapy and Research Center at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas

  • Cyclophosphamide, Fludarabine, Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients with Metastatic Uveal Melanoma

    This phase II trial studies how well cyclophosphamide, fludarabine, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, and aldesleukin work in treating patients with uveal melanoma that has spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes may be an effective treatment for uveal melanoma. Aldesleukin may stimulate white blood cells to kill uveal melanoma cells. Giving cyclophosphamide, fludarabine, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, and aldesleukin may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • A Trial of Niraparib in BAP1 and Other DNA Damage Response (DDR) Deficient Neoplasms (UF-STO-ETI-001)

    This open-label, non-randomized study will investigate the use of niraparib in patients with tumors known to have mutations in BAP1 and other select DNA damage response pathway genes.
    Location: University of Miami Miller School of Medicine-Sylvester Cancer Center, Miami, Florida

  • Autologous CD8+ SLC45A2-Specific T Lymphocytes with Cyclophosphamide, Aldesleukin, and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic Uveal Melanoma

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of autologous CD8 positive (+) SLC45A2-specific T lymphocytes when given together with cyclophosphamide, aldesleukin, and ipilimumab, and to see how well they work in treating patients with uveal melanoma that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). To make specialized CD8+ T cells, researchers separate out T cells collected from patients' blood and treat them so they are able to target melanoma cells. The blood cells are then given back to the patients. This is known as "adoptive T cell transfer" or "adoptive T cell therapy." Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, may work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Biological therapies, such as aldesleukin, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving autologous CD8+ SLC45A2-specific T lymphocytes together with cyclophosphamide, aldesleukin, and ipilimumab may work better in treating patients with metastatic uveal melanoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Intravenous and Intrathecal Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Leptomeningeal Disease

    This phase I / Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of intrathecal nivolumab, and how well it works in combination with intravenous nivolumab in treating patients with leptomeningeal disease. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Dabrafenib Mesylate, Trametinib, and 6 Melanoma Helper Peptide Vaccine in Treating Patients with Stage IIIB-IV Melanoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and how well dabrafenib mesylate, trametinib, and 6 melanoma helper peptide vaccine work in treating patients with stage IIIB-IV melanoma. Dabrafenib mesylate and trametinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Vaccines, such as 6 melanoma helper peptide vaccine, made from peptides derived from melanoma proteins, may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells that express melanoma-specific antigens. Giving dabrafenib, trametinib, and 6 melanoma helper peptide vaccine may work better in treating patients with melanoma.
    Location: University of Virginia Cancer Center, Charlottesville, Virginia

  • Sunitinib Malate or Valproic Acid in Preventing Metastasis in Patients With High-Risk Uveal Melanoma

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well sunitinib malate or valproic acid works in preventing high-risk uveal (eye) melanoma from spreading to other parts of the body. Sunitinib malate may stop the transmission of growth signals into tumor cells and prevents these cells from growing. Valproic acid may change the expression of some genes in uveal melanoma and suppress tumor growth.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes and High-Dose Aldesleukin with or without Autologous Dendritic Cells in Treating Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well therapeutic tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and high-dose aldesleukin with or without autologous dendritic cells work in treating patients with melanoma that has spread to other areas of the body. Vaccines made from a person's tumor cells and special blood cells (dendritic cells) may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Aldesleukin may stimulate the white blood cells to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known whether therapeutic tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and high-dose aldesleukin are more effective when given together with or without dendritic cells in shrinking or slowing the growth of melanoma. The clinical benefits of receiving tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in combination with the B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine / threonine kinase (BRAF) inhibitor will be studied, in patients who have progressive disease (PD) with using the BRAF inhibitor prior to TIL treatment. Leptomeningeal disease (LMD) is unfortunately a common development in patients with melanoma, with an extremely poor prognosis, translating into an overall survival of only weeks. With the novel approach of combining intrathecal TILs and intrathecal interleukin (IL)-2, researchers hope to induce long term disease stabilization or remission of LMD.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • A Study of RO7293583 in Participants With Unresectable Metastatic Tyrosinase Related Protein 1 (TYRP1)-Positive Melanomas

    This is a first-in-human, multi-center clinical study to determine the safety, Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) and / or Optimal Biological Dose (OBD) as well as the optimal schedule for intravenous (IV) and / or subcutaneous (SC) administrations of RO7293583 with or without obinutuzumab pretreatment, in participants with unresectable metastatic TYRP1-positive melanomas who have progressed on standard of care (SOC) treatment, are intolerant to SOC, or are non-amenable to SOC. This study will include an initial single participant dose-escalation part one followed by a multiple participant dose-escalation part two with the possibility of expansion.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Transarterial Chemoembolization for the Treatment of Uveal Melanoma with Liver Metastases

    This phase II trial studies the effect of transarterial chemoembolization in treating patients with uveal melanoma that has spread to the liver (liver metastases). Transarterial chemoembolization involves the injection of a blocking agent (gelatin sponge, ethiodized oil) and a chemotherapy agent (carmustine) directly into the artery in the liver to treat liver cancers. Chemotherapy drugs, such as carmustine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. transarterial chemoembolization with carmustine in combination with ethiodized oil and gelatin sponge may help cause the tumors in the liver to shrink or disappear.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


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