Treatment Clinical Trials for Mesothelioma

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for mesothelioma treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-40 of 40

  • Durvalumab with or without Tremelimumab in Treating Participants with Resectable Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    This phase II trial studies how well durvalumab with or without tremelimumab works in treating participants with malignant pleural mesothelioma that can be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: Baylor College of Medicine / Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Dendritic Cell Vaccine, Recombinant Interferon Alfa, Rintatolimod, and Celecoxib After Surgery in Treating Patients with Peritoneal Surface Cancers

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of recombinant interferon alfa when given together with a dendritic cell vaccine, rintatolimod, and celecoxib after surgery in treating patients with cancer on the surface of the peritoneum that spread from the appendix, colon, or rectum. Vaccines made from a person's dendritic cells (a type of white blood cells) mixed with tumor proteins may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Recombinant interferon alfa may improve the body's natural response to infections and other diseases. It may also interfere with the division of tumor cells and growth of tumors. Celecoxib and rintatolimod may help stimulate the immune system. Giving a dendritic cell vaccine, recombinant interferon alfa, celecoxib, and rintatolimod together may help stimulate the immune system to kill more tumor cells.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Cytoreductive Surgery and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Mitomycin C Followed by Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

    This phase II trial studies how well cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal mitomycin C followed by standard chemotherapy works in treating patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. Cytoreductive surgery helps to reduce the number of cancer cells prior to treatment. Hyperthermia therapy kills tumor cells by heating them to several degrees above normal body temperature. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin C, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Infusing mitomycin C directly into the abdomen may kill more tumor cells while reducing side effects. Giving cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal mitomycin C may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Montefiore Medical Center-Weiler Hospital, Bronx, New York

  • A Study of LY3023414 in Participants With Advanced Cancer

    The purpose of this study is to find a recommended dose level and schedule of dosing LY3023414 that can safely be taken by participants with advanced or metastatic cancer. The study will also explore the changes to various markers in blood cells and potentially tumor cells. Finally, the study will help document any antitumor activity this drug may have. In Part A of this study, participants with advanced / metastatic cancer (including lymphoma) will receive increasing doses of LY3023414. In Part B, LY3023414 will be explored in different types of cancer, including breast and lung cancer, lymphoma and mesothelioma.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Mithramycin for Lung, Esophagus, and Other Chest Cancers

    Background: - Mithramycin is a drug that was first tested as a cancer therapy in the 1960s. It acted against some forms of cancer, but was never accepted as a treatment. Research suggests that it may be useful against some cancers of the chest, such as lung and esophageal cancer or mesothelioma. Researchers want to see if mithramycin can be used to treat these types of cancer. Objectives: - To see if mithramycin is safe and effective against different chest cancers. Eligibility: - Individuals at least 18 years of age who have lung, esophagus, pleura, or mediastinum cancers. Design: - Participants will be screened with a physical exam and medical history. Blood and urine samples will be collected. Imaging studies and tumor tissue samples will be used to monitor the cancer before treatment. - Participants will receive mithramycin every day for 7 days, followed by 7 days without treatment. Each 14-day round of treatment is called a cycle. - Treatment will be monitored with frequent blood tests and imaging studies. - Participants will continue to take the drug for as long as the side effects are not severe and the tumor responds to treatment.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Window of Opportunity Study of VS-6063 (Defactinib) in Participants With Surgical Resectable Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma.

    This is an open label neoadjuvant (treatment with VS-6063 prior to mesothelioma surgery) study in subjects with malignant pleural mesothelioma who are eligible for surgery. Subjects will receive VS-6063 (defactinib) 400 mg twice daily for 12, 21, or 35 days. Pre- and post-treatment biopsies and blood samples will be collected. The purpose of this study is to assess biomarker responses from tumor tissue. The safety, pharmacokinetics, and tumor response rate to VS-6063 (defactinib) will be also be assessed.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • An Efficacy Study of Milataxel (TL139) Administered Orally for Malignant Mesothelioma

    Milataxel is a new taxane that may have several advantages over the currently available taxanes. The current study is designed to determine the response rate of oral Milataxel in patients with malignant Mesothelioma. The study specifically targets patients who have recurring or progressive disease following previous chemotherapy.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Light Dosimetry for Photodynamic Therapy with Porfimer Sodium in Treating Patients with Malignant Mesothelioma or Non-small Cell Lung Cancer with Pleural Disease Undergoing Surgery

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and how well light dosimetry system works during photodynamic therapy with porfimer sodium in treating patients with malignant mesothelioma or non-small cell lung cancer with pleural disease undergoing surgery. Light dosimetry measures the amount of laser light given during photodynamic therapy. Photodynamic therapy uses a drug, such as porfimer sodium, that becomes active when it is exposed to light. The activated drug may kill tumor cells. Using light dosimetry for intraoperative photodynamic therapy may help doctors estimate how much light is delivered during photodynamic therapy and decide if the treatment should be stopped or continued.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Donor Natural Killer Cells, Cyclophosphamide, and Etoposide in Treating Children and Young Adults with Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of cord blood-derived expanded allogeneic natural killer cells (donor natural killer [NK] cells) and also how well they work when given together with cyclophosphamide and etoposide in treating children and young adults with solid tumors that have come back (relapsed) or that do not respond to treatment (refractory). NK cells, white blood cells important to the immune system, are donated / collected from cord blood collected at birth from healthy babies and grown in the lab. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving NK cells together with cyclophosphamide and etoposide may work better in treating children and young adults with solid tumors.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Mesothelin-Targeted Immunotoxin LMB-100 in Combination With SEL-110 in Subjects With Malignant Pleural or Peritoneal Mesothelioma

    Background: Mesothelioma is cancer of the tissue that lines some organs. A new drug, LMB-100, may bind to a protein on mesothelioma tumors and kill cancer cells. But sometimes the body makes antibodies that reduce how well LMB-100 works. Researchers want to see if adding the drug SEL-110 to LMB-100 will prevent these antibodies from forming. Objective: To learn how safe and tolerable LMB-100 plus SEL-110 is in people with advanced mesothelioma. Eligibility: Adults ages 18 and older who have pleural or peritoneal mesothelioma that has not responded to prior platinum-based therapy Design: Participants will be screened with - Medical history - Physical exam - Blood and urine tests - Sample of tumor tissue. This can be from a previous procedure. - Scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. Participants will lie on a table in a scanner that takes pictures. A special dye may be injected in a vein. - Positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scan. A sugar attached to a chemical that gives off a signal will be injected before the scan. - Heart function tests The study will be done in 21-day cycles. Participants will get the study drugs for up to 4 cycles. They will get them through an IV catheter (a tube inserted in a vein, usually in the arm): - LMB-100 for about 30 minutes on day 1, day 3, and day 5 of each cycle - SEL-110 for about 1 hour on day 1 of each cycle Participants will get standard medicines to help prevent side effects. Participants will repeat some screening tests during each cycle and about 5 weeks after the last dose of study drug.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Pembrolizumab with or without Anetumab Ravtansine in Treating Patients with Mesothelin-Positive Pleural Mesothelioma

    This randomized phase I / II trial studies the side effects and how well pembrolizumab with or without anetumab ravtansine work in treating patients with mesothelin-positive pleural mesothelioma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as anetumab ravtansine and pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Continuous 24h Intravenous Infusion of Mithramycin, an Inhibitor of Cancer Stem Cell Signaling, in People With Primary Thoracic Malignancies or Carcinomas, Sarcomas or Germ Cell Neoplasms With Pleuropulmonary Metastases

    Background: Mithramycin is a new cancer drug. In another study, people with chest cancer took the drug 6 hours a day for 7 straight days. Many of them had liver damage as a side effect. It was discovered that only people with certain genes got this side effect. Researchers want to test mithramycin in people who do not have those certain genes. Objectives: To find the highest safe dose of mithramycin that can be given to people with chest cancer who have certain genes over 24 hours instead of spread out over a longer period of time. To see if mithramycin given as a 24-hour infusion shrinks tumors. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older who have chest cancer that is not shrinking with known therapies, and whose genes will limit the chance of liver damage from mithramycin Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Blood and urine tests Lung and heart function tests X-rays or scans of their tumor Liver ultrasound Tumor biopsy Participants will be admitted to the hospital overnight. A small plastic tube (catheter) will be inserted in the arm or chest. They will get mithramycin through the catheter over about 24 hours. If they do not have bad side effects or their cancer does not worsen, they can repeat the treatment every 14 days. Participants will have multiple visits for each treatment cycle. These include repeats of certain screening tests. After stopping treatment, participants will have weekly visits until they recover from any side effects.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This pilot phase I trial studies pembrolizumab in treating patients malignant pleural mesothelioma that can be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Adjuvant Tumor Lysate Vaccine and Iscomatrix With or Without Metronomic Oral Cyclophosphamide and Celecoxib in Patients With Malignancies Involving Lungs, Esophagus, Pleura, or Mediastinum

    Background: During recent years, cancer-testis (CT) antigens (CTA), particularly those encoded by genes on the X chromosome (CT-X genes), have emerged as attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy. Whereas malignancies of diverse histologies express a variety of CTAs, immune responses to these proteins appear uncommon in cancer patients, possibly due to low-level, heterogeneous antigen expression, as well as immunosuppressive regulatory T cells present within tumor sites and systemic circulation of these individuals. Conceivably, vaccination of cancer patients with tumor cells expressing high levels of CTAs in combination with regimens that deplete or inhibit T regulatory cells will induce broad immunity to these antigens. In order to examine this issue, patients with primary lung and esophageal cancers, pleural mesotheliomas, thoracic sarcomas, thymic neoplasms and mediastinal germ cell tumors, as well as sarcomas, melanomas, germ cell tumors, or epithelial malignancies metastatic to lungs, pleura or mediastinum with no evidence of disease (NED) or minimal residual disease (MRD) following standard multidisciplinary therapy will be vaccinated with H1299 tumor cell lysates with Iscomatrix adjuvant. Vaccines will be administered with or without metronomic oral cyclophosphamide (50 mg PO BID x 7d q 14d), and celecoxib (400 mg PO BID). Serologic responses to a variety of recombinant CTAs as well as immunologic responses to autologous tumor or epigenetically modified autologous EBVtransformed lymphocytes will be assessed before and after a six month vaccination period. Primary Objectives: 1. To assess the frequency of immunologic responses to CTAs in patients with thoracic malignancies following vaccinations with H1299 cell lysate / Iscomatrix(TM) vaccines alone in comparison to patients with thoracic malignancies following vaccinations with H1299 cell lysate / Iscomatrix vaccines in combination with metronomic cyclophosphamide and celecoxib. Secondary Objectives: 1. To examine if oral metronomic cyclophosphamide and celecoxib therapy diminishes the number and percentage of T regulatory cells and diminishes activity of these cells in patients with thoracic malignancies are at risk of recurrence. 2. To examine if H1299 cell lysate / Iscomatrix(TM) vaccination enhances immunologic response to autologous tumor or epigenetically modified autologous EBV-transformed lymphocytes (B cells). Eligibility: - Patients with histologically or cytologically proven small cell or non-small cell lung cancer (SCLC;NSCLC), esophageal cancer (EsC), malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) , thymic or mediastinal germ cell tumors, thoracic sarcomas, or melanomas, sarcomas, or epithelial malignancies metastatic to lungs, pleura or mediastinum who have no clinical evidence of active disease (NED), or minimal residual disease (MRD) not readily accessible by non-invasive biopsy or resection / radiation following standard therapy completed within the past 26 weeks. - Patients must be 18 years or older with an ECOG performance status of 0 2. - Patients must have adequate bone marrow, kidney, liver, lung and cardiac function. - Patients may not be on systemic immunosuppressive medications at time vaccinations commence Design: - Following recovery from surgery, chemotherapy, or chemo / XRT, patients with NED or MRD will be vaccinated via IM injection with H1299 cell lysates and Iscomatrix(TM) adjuvant monthly for 6 months. - Vaccines will be administered with or without with metronomic oral cyclophosphamide and celecoxib. - Systemic toxicities and immunologic response to therapy will be recorded. Pre and post vaccination serologic and cell mediated responses to a standard panel of CT antigens as well as autologous tumor cells (if available) and EBV-transformed lymphocytes will be assessed before and after vaccination. - Numbers / percentages and function of T regulatory cells in peripheral blood will be assessed before, during, and after vaccinations. - Patients will be followed in the clinic with routine staging scans until disease recurrence. - The trial will randomize 28 evaluable patients per arm to either receive vaccine alone or vaccine plus chemotherapy in order to have 80% power to determine if the frequency of immune responses on the combination arm exceeds that of the vaccine alone arm, if the expected frequencies of immune responses on the two arms were 20% and 50%, using a one-sided 0.10 alpha level Fisher s exact
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Tremelimumab and Durvalumab in Treating Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well tremelimumab and durvalumab work in treating patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma that cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies such as tremelimumab and durvalumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grown and spread. Giving tremelimumab with durvalumab may be a better way to treat malignant pleural mesothelioma.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov