Treatment Clinical Trials for Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Disease

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative disease treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-50 of 88

  • Giving Chemotherapy and rATG for a Shortened Amount of Time before a Donor Stem Cell Transplantation for the Treatment of Patients with Blood Cancers

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of giving chemotherapy and a drug called rATG for a shorter period of time before a donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with blood cancers. This study will also look at whether the condensed regimen can shorten hospitalization following the transplantation. A chemotherapy regimen with the drugs busulfan, melphalan, and fludarabine may kill cancer cells in the body, making room in the bone marrow for new blood stem cells to grow and reducing the chance of transplanted cell rejection. The chemotherapy drugs work to interrupt the DNA (genetic information) in the cancer cells, stopping the cells from dividing and causing them to die. rATG targets and deactivates white blood cells called T cells that survive the chemotherapy. T cells may see the donor’s cells as foreign, causing a serious condition called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). rATG helps prevent the donor stem cells from being rejected. Giving chemotherapy and rATG for a shorter period of time before a donor stem cell transplantation may help in reducing the number of side effects and shortening hospitalization following the transplantation.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • PLX51107 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of PLX51107 and how well it works with azacitidine in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. PLX51107 may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving PLX51107 and azacitidine may work better than azacitidine alone in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Optimizing PTCy Dose and Timing

    Background: Stem cell or bone marrow transplants can cure or control blood cancers. Sometimes the donor cells see the recipient s body as foreign. This can cause complications. A high dose of the drug cyclophosphamide (PTCy) can help reduce these risks. Researchers want to see if a lower dose of PTCy can have the same benefits. Objective: To see if a lower dose of PTCy will help people with blood cancers have a more successful transplant and fewer side effects. Eligibility: People ages 15-65 with leukemia, lymphoma, or multiple myeloma that is not curable with standard therapy and is at high risk of returning without transplant, and their healthy adult relatives Design: Transplant participants will be screened with: Blood, urine, breathing, and heart tests Scans Chest x-ray Bone marrow samples: A needle inserted into the participant s pelvis will remove marrow and a bone fragment. Transplant recipients will stay at the hospital and be prepped with chemotherapy over 6 days for the transplant. They will get stem cells through a catheter in the chest or neck. They will get the cyclophosphamide chemotherapy. They will stay in the hospital about 4 more weeks. They will have blood transfusions. They will have frequent blood tests and 2 bone marrow samples within 1 year after the transplant. Donor participants will be screened with: Blood, urine, and heart tests Chest x-ray Scans Donor participants will have bone marrow taken from their pelvis or stem cells taken from their blood. For the blood donation, blood will be taken from a vein in one arm, move through a machine to remove white blood cells, and be returned through a vein in the other arm. Participation will last up to 5 years....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Adoptive Cellular Therapy (PRGN-3006 T Cells) in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I / Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of PRGN-3006 T cells in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. PRGN-3006 T cells uses the patient’s own genetically altered blood cells to treat cancer. PRGN-3006 T cells are made from white blood cells that are removed from the patient. The cells are genetically modified to create a protein (called a chimeric antigen receptor or CAR) on the surface of T cells, a type of blood cell that fights infection and cancer cells. The hope is that the CAR on the T cells will bind to and kill cells that express CD33, a molecule that is found on the surface of cancer cells from myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia patients.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • CPX-351 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies best dose and side effects of liposome-encapsulated daunorubicin-cytarabine (CPX-351) and how well it works in treating patients with high risk myelodysplastic syndrome or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia that has come back or has not responded to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as liposome-encapsulated daunorubicin-cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • A Study of LB-100 in Patients With Low or Intermediate-1 Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS)

    The purpose of this study is to test the safety and efficacy (benefits) of an investigational drug LB-100, for treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes. LB-100 has previously been administered to patients with various solid tumors. In this study, LB-100 will be administered as an intravenous infusion over 120 minutes. This study will be conducted in 2 phases. In phase Ib, escalating doses of LB-100 will be administered to patients to study the safety and to determine a safe dose of LB-100. In phase 2, patients will be administered LB-100 at the dose that was found to be safe in phase Ib. The efficacy (benefits) and safety of LB-100 will be determined in this phase of the study.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Azacitidine, Venetoclax, and Pevonedistat in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose of venetoclax when given together with azacitidine and pevonedistat and to see how well it works in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Venetoclax and pevonedistat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving azacitidine, venetoclax, and pevonedistat may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Stem Cell Transplant with Chemotherapy and Selected Use of Blinatumomab in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well transplanting blood cells with chemotherapy work in treating patients with a high risk blood cancer that is in remission. Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells and cancer cells. It may also help stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft versus host disease). Giving filgrastim may stop this from happening. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving stem cells with chemotherapy and blinatumomab may work better in treating patients with blood cancer.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • CD45RA Depleted T Cell Infusion after Alpha / Beta Depleted Stem Cell Transplant for the Reduction of Complications in Patients at Risk for Viral or Fungal Infections

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of CD45RA depleted T cell infusion given after an alpha / beta depleted stem cell transplant, and to see how well it works in reducing complications in patients at risk for viral or fungal infections. There is a higher rate of complications using cells from an unrelated or partially matched related donor. Some donor cells may cause a complication called graft versus host disease (GVHD) and an infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In this study, the CliniMACs device is used before the transplant to remove alpha / beta T cells that may cause GVHD and B cells that carry EBV. The device is also used to remove CD45RA T cells. Giving CD45RA depleted T cells after the transplant may reduce some of the complications of the transplant and decrease the time it takes for the new stem cells to grow in the body.
    Location: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Ruxolitinib in Treating Patients with Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well ruxolitinib works in treating patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Ruxolitinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Donor T Cell Depletion in Preventing Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Blood Cancer Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies donor T cell depletion in preventing graft versus host disease (GVHD) in patients with blood cancer undergoing a donor stem cell transplant. Donor stem cell transplants, especially in the mismatched donor setting, are associated with increased risk for GVHD, a condition where the transplanted donor white blood cells attack your body’s normal tissues. Using a cell separation device may remove a subset of white blood cells (called alpha / beta T cells) from the donor product before the product is transplanted. This study is being done to assess whether this manipulation (called selective T cell depletion) will reduce the risk of GVHD and improve transplant outcome.
    Location: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Enasidenib and Azacitidine in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia and IDH2 Gene Mutation

    This phase II trial studies how well enasidenib and azacitidine work in treating patients with IDH2 gene mutation and acute myeloid leukemia that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Enasidenib and azacitidine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Liposome-encapsulated Daunorubicin-Cytarabine and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well liposome-encapsulated daunorubicin-cytarabine and gemtuzumab ozogamicin work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or that does not respond to treatment (refractory) or high risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as liposome-encapsulated daunorubicin-cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called gemtuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called calicheamicin. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin attached to CD33 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers calicheamicin to kill them. Giving liposome-encapsulated daunorubicin-cytarabine and gemtuzumab ozogamicin together may be an effective treatment for relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia or high risk myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • 211At-BC8-B10 followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of a radioactive agent linked to an antibody (211At-BC8-B10) followed by donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia, or acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or myelodysplastic syndrome that has come back or isn't responding to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as 211At-BC8-B10, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can attack the body's normal cells, called graft versus host disease. Giving cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate mofetil, and sirolimus after a transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Edetate Calcium Disodium or Succimer in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome Undergoing Chemotherapy

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of edetate calcium disodium or succimer in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing chemotherapy. Edetate calcium disodium or succimer may help to lower the level of metals found in the bone marrow and blood and may help to control the disease and / or improve response to chemotherapy.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant using Alpha / Beta+ T-Cell Depletion in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of donor stem cell transplant using allogeneic TCR alpha / beta-positive T-lymphocyte-depleted peripheral blood stem cells (alpha / beta positive [+] T-cell depletion) in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells called graft-versus-host disease. Removing the T cells from the donor cells before the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Omacetaxine and Azacitidine in Treating Participants with High Grade Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of omacetaxine mepesuccinate (omacetaxine) and how well it works when given together with azacitidine in treating participants with high grade myelodysplastic syndrome or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as omacetaxine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Azacitidine may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving omacetaxine and azacitidine may work better at treating participants with myelodysplastic syndrome or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia.
    Location: University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado

  • Ivosidenib as Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients with IDH1-mutant Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia following Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of ivosidenib as maintenance therapy in treating patients with IDH1-mutant acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia following stem cell transplant. Ivosidenib is an inhibitor of the protein IDH1. IDH1 is an enzyme that, when mutated, can overproduce metabolites (substances that help with metabolism) and compounds that contribute to the growth of cancer cells. Ivosidenib may help block the over production of these substances and possibly reduce the chances of relapse in patients with IDH1-mutant myeloid cancers.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Tocilizumab in Improving Graft-Versus-Host Disease and Early Side Effects in Patients with Blood Cancers Undergoing Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well tocilizumab works in improving graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and early side effects in patients with blood cancers undergoing umbilical cord blood transplant. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before an umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called GVHD). Giving tocilizumab in addition to the standard approach for GVHD prevention after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Venetoclax and Decitabine in Treating Participants with Relapsed / Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Relapsed High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase II trial studies how well venetoclax and decitabine work in treating participants with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment, or with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome that has come back. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as venetoclax and decitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • DEC-205 / NY-ESO-1 Fusion Protein CDX-1401, Poly ICLC, Decitabine, and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of DEC-205 / NY-ESO-1 fusion protein CDX-1401, poly ICLC, decitabine, and nivolumab in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia. DEC-205 / NY-ESO-1 fusion protein CDX-1401 is a vaccine that may help the immune system specifically target and kill cancer cells. Poly ICLC may help stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as decitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving DEC-205 / NY-ESO-1 fusion protein CDX-1401, poly ICLC, decitabine, and nivolumab may work better in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well fludarabine phosphate, cyclophosphamide, total body irradiation, and donor stem cell transplant work in treating patients with blood cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • HA-1 T TCR T cell Immunotherapy for the Treating of Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia after Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of CD4+ and CD8+ HA-1 T cell receptor (TCR) T cells in treating patients with acute leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment following donor stem cell transplant. T cell receptor is a special protein on T cells that helps them recognize proteins on other cells including leukemia. HA-1 is a protein that is present on the surface of some peoples' blood cells, including leukemia. HA-1 T cell immunotherapy enables genes to be added to the donor cells to make them recognize HA-1 markers on leukemia cells.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Selumetinib and Azacitidine in Treating Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Myelodysplastic / Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, and Myelofibrosis

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of selumetinib when given together with azacitidine in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, myelodysplastic / myeloproliferative neoplasm, and myelofibrosis. Selumetinib and azacitidine may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well donor stem cell transplant works in treating patients with blood cancer. Giving total-body irradiation before a donor transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota