Treatment Clinical Trials for Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Disease

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative disease treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 76-84 of 84

  • Study of AR-67 (DB-67) in Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS)

    The purpose of this study is to determine if AR-67 is effective in the treatment for patients with MDS.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • An Open-Label, Multicenter, Extension Study for Subjects Who Participated in Prior Clinical Studies of ASTX727 (Standard Dose)

    Extension study for subjects who participated in a previous Astex-sponsored clinical study of ASTX727 (including, but not limited to ASTX727-01, ASTX727-02, ASTX727-04).
    Location: 5 locations

  • Rivogenlecleucel Donor Lymphocyte Immunotherapy in Treating Patients with Recurrent Blood Cancers after Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of rivogenlecleucel, and how well it works, in treating patients with blood cancer that has come back (recurrent) after stem cell transplant. Donor T-cell therapy (rivogenlecleucel) may help control transplant-related infections after stem cell transplant.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Decitabine with Ruxolitinib or Fedratinib for the Treatment of Accelerated / Blast Phase Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    This phase II trial studies how well decitabine with ruxolitinib or fedratinib works before hematopoietic stem cell transplant in treating patients with accelerated / blast phase myeloproliferative neoplasms (tumors). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as decitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Ruxolitinib and fedratinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving chemotherapy before a donor hematopoietic stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Decitabine, with ruxolitinib or fedratinib, may work better than multi-agent chemotherapy or no pre-transplant therapy, in treating patients with accelerated / blast phase myeloproliferative neoplasms.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • SNS-301 Monotherapy in High Risk MDS and CMML

    To evaluate safety, immunogenicity and anti-tumor responses of intradermally delivered SNS-301 in patients with ASPH+ high risk MDS and CMML.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Salsalate, Venetoclax, and Decitabine or Azacitidine for the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Advanced Myelodysplasia / Myeloproliferative Disease

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of salsalate when added to venetoclax and decitabine or azacitidine in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplasia / myeloproliferative disease that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as salsalate, venetoclax, decitabine, and azacitidine work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey

  • Comparing ATG or Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide to Calcineurin Inhibitor-Methotrexate as GVHD Prophylaxis after Myeloablative Unrelated Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation

    This phase II trial studies how well 3 different drug combinations prevent graft versus host disease (GVHD) after donor stem cell transplant. Calcineurin inhibitors, such as cyclosporine and tacrolimus, may stop the activity of donor cells that can cause GVHD. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cyclophosphamide and methotrexate, may also stop the donor cells that can lead to GVHD while not affecting the cancer-fighting donor cells. Immunosuppressive therapy, such as anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG), is used to decrease the body's immune response and reduces the risk of GVHD. It is not yet known which combination of drugs: 1) ATG, methotrexate, and calcineurin inhibitor 2) cyclophosphamide and calcineurin inhibitor, or 3) methotrexate and calcineurin inhibitor may work best to prevent graft versus host disease and result in best overall outcome after donor stem cell transplant.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • CPX-351 and Palbociclib in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of palbociclib when given together with CPX-351 and to see how well they work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as CPX-351, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Palbociclib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. The purpose of this study is to test the safety and efficacy of the combination of palbociclib plus CPX-351 in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Donor Progenitor Cell and Natural Kill Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well donor progenitor cell and natural killer cell transplant works in treating younger patients with cancers of the blood that are at high risk of coming back or spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient’s immune system from rejecting the donor’s stem cells. When certain stem cells and natural killer cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient’s bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body’s normal cells. Removing the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee