Treatment Clinical Trials for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for non-small cell lung cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 476-500 of 506

  • A Study to Evaluate Safety, PK and Efficacy of HS-10296 in Patients With NSCLC

    This is a Phase 1 / 2, open-label, multicenter study of HS-10296 with dose escalation, dose expansion and extension cohorts in locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who have progressed following prior therapy with an epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) agent. The study is designed to evaluate safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), and anti-tumor activity of once-daily and orally (PO) administered HS-10296. The overall study design is shown in the flow chart below, which consists of 3 phases: dose escalation, dose expansion and extension cohort.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • An Investigational Immuno-therapy Trial of Nivolumab, or Nivolumab Plus Ipilimumab, or Nivolumab Plus Platinum-doublet Chemotherapy, Compared to Platinum Doublet Chemotherapy in Patients With Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    The purpose of this study is to show that Nivolumab, or Nivolumab plus Ipilimumab, or Nivolumab plus Platinum-Doublet Chemotherapy improves progression free survival and / or overall survival compared with chemotherapy in patients with advanced lung cancer.
    Location: University of California San Diego, San Diego, California

  • A Study of BGB324 in Combination With Erlotinib in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    A Phase I / 2 multi-center open-label study of BGB324 in combination with erlotinib in patients with Stage IIIb or Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer. BGB324 is a potent selective small molecule inhibitor of Axl, a surface membrane protein kinase receptor which is connected with poor prognosis and acquired resistance to therapy.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Patients With Intermediate or High Risk Stage I or Stage IIA Non-squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    The optimal treatment for Stage I or Stage IIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains controversial. Radiographic surveillance alone has been recommended for stage I and stage IIA patients after the tumor is removed surgically from the lung, and this standard has been based on the fact that no previous clinical trial has demonstrated a benefit for Stage I or Stage IIA NSCLC patients who receive post-operative chemotherapy. These patients, however, have a substantial risk of death within five years after operation, ranging from approximately 30% to 45%, largely due to metastatic disease that is present immediately after surgery but that is undetectable by conventional methods. Some leading organizations therefore currently recommend post-operative chemotherapy as an alternative standard of care in Stage I or Stage IIA NSCLC patients who are considered to be at particularly high-risk. Up until now, however, there has not been a well-validated means to identify stage I and stage IIA NSCLC patients at high risk of death within five years after operation. A new prognostic tool, a 14-Gene Prognostic Assay, which has been validated and definitively demonstrated in large scale studies to identify intermediate and high-risk stage I or Stage IIA patients with non-squamous NSCLC, is now available to all clinicians through a CLIA-certified laboratory. It is therefore now possible to compare the outcomes of patients randomly assigned to one or the other of these competing standards of care.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • Safety and Efficacy of Talactoferrin in Addition to Standard Chemotherapy in Patients With Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    The purpose of the study is to determine whether the combination of talactoferrin, carboplatin and paclitaxel improves progression free survival and overall survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer compared to the combination of paclitaxel and carboplatin alone
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • AB-16B5 Combined With Docetaxel in Subjects With Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This Phase II study will recruit 40 metastatic non-small cell lung cancer patients who failed treatment with a platinum-containing doublet treatment and an anti-PD1 or PD-L1 immune checkpoint antibody, administered simultaneously or sequentially. All recruited patients will receive AB-16B5 at a dose of 12 mg / kg once weekly combined with docetaxel at a dose of 75 mg / m2 once every 3 weeks.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • 177Lu-DTPA-Omburtamab Radioimmunotherapy for Leptomeningeal Metastasis From Solid Tumors

    Adults with leptomeningeal metastasis from solid tumors will be treated with 177Lu-DTPA-omburtamab, which is a radioactive labelling of a murine monoclonal antibody targeting B7-H3.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Personalized Therapeutic Anti-tumor Vaccine and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects of personalized therapeutic anti-tumor vaccine and pembrolizumab in treating patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer. Vaccines made from peptides may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving a personalized therapeutic anti-tumor vaccine and pembrolizumab may work better in treating patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • MRX-2843 and Osimertinib for the Treatment of Advanced EGFR Mutant Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase Ib trial evaluates the best dose and side effects of MRX-2843 when given in combination with osimertinib in treating patients with EGFR gene mutant non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). MRX-2843 and osimertinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Emory University Hospital / Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia

  • ADMIRAL Trial: Adaptive Mediastinal Radiation with Chemo-Immunotherapy

    This phase II trial studies two questions in patients with stage III NSCLC: 1) does it improve cancer control to add the drug Durvalumab, a type of immunotherapy, earlier in the treatment course; and 2) by intensifying treatment with durvalumab, is it possible to avoid mediastinal radiation to decrease side effects, without decreasing cancer control?
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Personalized Vaccine (PANDA-VAC) and Pembrolizumab for the Treatment of Squamous Cell Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of a personalized vaccine (PANDA-VAC) when giving together with pembrolizumab in treating patients with squamous cell non-small cell lung cancer or squamous cell head and neck cancer. Abnormal cells, such as cancer cells, have special substances on their surface (called neoantigens) that are not found in normal cells. The personalized vaccine is a mix of neoantigens that are specific to the person's cancer. Vaccines work to boost the immune response in fighting abnormal cells. Immune cells can recognize these neoantigen substances and destroy the abnormal cells that carry them. After this, the immune system has a “memory” that helps it respond to those substances in the future. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving PANDA-VAC in combination with pembrolizumab may help strengthen the way the immune system responds to squamous cell non-small cell lung cancer and squamous cell head and neck cancer.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • Light Dosimetry for Photodynamic Therapy with Porfimer Sodium in Treating Patients with Malignant Mesothelioma or Non-small Cell Lung Cancer with Pleural Disease Undergoing Surgery

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and how well light dosimetry system works during photodynamic therapy with porfimer sodium in treating patients with malignant mesothelioma or non-small cell lung cancer with pleural disease undergoing surgery. Light dosimetry measures the amount of laser light given during photodynamic therapy. Photodynamic therapy uses a drug, such as porfimer sodium, that becomes active when it is exposed to light. The activated drug may kill tumor cells. Using light dosimetry for intraoperative photodynamic therapy may help doctors estimate how much light is delivered during photodynamic therapy and decide if the treatment should be stopped or continued.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Atezolizumab and Pirfenidone for the Treatment of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase I / II trial finds out the best dose of pirfenidone when given together with atezolizumab and studies the effect of the combination of atezolizumab and pirfenidone in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Pirfenidone in an anti-inflammatory drug that may slow tumor cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. The body’s immune system functions to defend against “foreign” cells such as cancer, by making special cells known as T-cells. T-cells are a type of white blood cell that work to protect the body from any infections and tumor cells that might pose as a threat. The T-cells in the body recognize tumor cells as “foreign” and work to get rid of them, but in time tumor cells develop and find ways to hide or camouflage themselves from the immune system so that they cannot be detected. The tumor cells can also produce chemicals that decreases the function of T cells. Giving pirfenidone may help reduce the production of chemicals that decreases the function of T cells and by doing so, increase the activity of atezolizumab and prevent tumor cells from resisting the immune systems detection and get rid of them.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Restorative Microbiota Therapy in Combination with Durvalumab with or without Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Stage IIIB-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the effect, safety and tolerability of restorative microbiota therapy (RMT) in combination with durvalumab with or without chemotherapy in treating patients with stage IIIB-IV non-small cell lung cancer. RMT is prepared by extracting healthy bacteria from the stool of healthy human donors while rigorously testing samples for harmful bacteria and viruses before processing. The extract is then made into capsules which is taken by mouth. RMT may make immunotherapy more effective. Durvalumab is a type of anti-cancer therapy called immunotherapy that uses the patient’s own immune system to attack tumor cells. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin, pemetrexed, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving RMT may make durvalumab treatment with or without chemotherapy more effective in controlling stage IIIB-IV non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Testing the Use of Targeted Treatment (AMG 510) for KRAS G12C Mutated Advanced Non-squamous Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (A Lung-MAP Treatment Trial)

    This phase II Lung-MAP treatment trial studies the effect of AMG 510 in treating non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer that is stage IV or has come back (recurrent) and has a specific mutation in the KRAS gene, known as KRAS G12C. Mutations in this gene may cause the cancer to grow. AMG 510, a targeted treatment against the KRAS G12C mutation, may help stop the growth of tumor cells.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Non-Viral TCR Gene Therapy

    Background: A person s white blood cells can be modified in a lab to recognize certain changes in their tumor. Many of these cells are collected from the person, modified, then given back to the person. This may help treat some cancers. Objective: To learn if a person s white blood cells modified with T-cell receptors can cause solid tumors to shrink. Eligibility: People ages 18-70 who have cancer of the gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, ovary, breast, or lung that has spread, or who have glioblastoma. Design: Participants will be screened and have their cells prepared for treatment in another protocol. Participants will be hospitalized one week before treatment. They will stay approximately 3 - 4 weeks after treatment. Participants will get the modified white blood cells and chemotherapy through an IV catheter, which is a small plastic tube inserted in a vein. Participants will take drugs by mouth to prevent infection. They will receive filgrastim as a shot or injection under the skin. Participants will have tests before, during, and after treatment: Heart, blood, and urine tests Chest X-ray Physical exam Scans: They will lie in a machine that takes pictures of the body. Possible apheresis: The participant s blood is removed through a needle in an arm. The blood goes through a machine that removes the white blood cells. The rest of the blood is returned through a needle in the other arm. Participants will have visits about 6 and 12 weeks after treatment. If they are responding to treatment, they will then have visits every 3-6 months for 3 years. Then they will join another study and be followed about 12 more years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Ipilimumab and Nivolumab as First-Line Therapy in Treating Patients with Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well ipilimumab and nivolumab work as first-line therapy in treating patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Pembrolizumab and Trametinib in Treating Patients with Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and KRAS Gene Mutations

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects of pembrolizumab and trametinib in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer and KRAS gene mutations that has spread to other places in the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Trametinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab and trametinib may work better in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • Nazartinib and Gefitinib in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Stage IIIB-IV EGFR-Mutant Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nazartinib and gefitinib work in treating patients with EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer that has come back or is stage IIIB-IV. Nazartinib and gefitinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Osimertinib in Treating Patients with Stage IIIB-IV or Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer with EGFR Exon 20 Insertion Mutations

    This phase II trial studies how well osimertinib works in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer with EGFR exon 20 insertion mutation that is stage IIIB-IV or has come back (recurrent). Osimertinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 290 locations

  • Pembrolizumab and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Melanoma or Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase Ib / IIa trial studies the side effects and best dose of stereotactic body radiation therapy when given together with pembrolizumab in treating patients with melanoma or non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may block specific proteins which may strengthen the immune system and control tumor growth. Giving stereotactic body radiation therapy may prolong the response to pembrolizumab in patients with melanoma or non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • T Cell Receptor Immunotherapy for Patients With Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Background: The NCI Surgery Branch has developed an experimental therapy that involves taking white blood cells from patients' tumors, growing them in the laboratory in large numbers, and then giving the cells back to the patient. These cells are called Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes, or TIL and we have given this type of treatment to over 100 patients. In this study, we are selecting a specific subset of white blood cells from the tumor that we think are the most effective in fighting tumors and will use only these cells in making the tumor fighting cells. Objective: The purpose of this study is to see if these specifically selected tumor fighting cells can cause non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors to shrink and to see if this treatment is safe. Eligibility: - Adults age 18-70 with NSCLC who have a tumor that can be safely removed. Design: - Work up stage: Patients will be seen as an outpatient at the NIH clinical Center and undergo a history and physical examination, scans, x-rays, lab tests, and other tests as needed - Surgery: If the patients meet all of the requirements for the study they will undergo surgery to remove a tumor that can be used to grow the TIL product. - Leukapheresis: Patients may undergo leukapheresis to obtain additional white blood cells. {Leukapheresis is a common procedure, which removes only the white blood cells from the patient.} - Treatment: Once their cells have grown, the patients will be admitted to the hospital for the conditioning chemotherapy, the TIL cells and aldesleukin. They will stay in the hospital for about 4 weeks for the treatment. Follow up: Patients will return to the clinic for a physical exam, review of side effects, lab tests, and scans about every 1-3 months for the first year, and then every 6 months to 1 year as long as their tumors are shrinking. Follow up visits take up to 2 days.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Adjuvant Tumor Lysate Vaccine and Iscomatrix With or Without Metronomic Oral Cyclophosphamide and Celecoxib in Patients With Malignancies Involving Lungs, Esophagus, Pleura, or Mediastinum

    Background: During recent years, cancer-testis (CT) antigens (CTA), particularly those encoded by genes on the X chromosome (CT-X genes), have emerged as attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy. Whereas malignancies of diverse histologies express a variety of CTAs, immune responses to these proteins appear uncommon in cancer patients, possibly due to low-level, heterogeneous antigen expression, as well as immunosuppressive regulatory T cells present within tumor sites and systemic circulation of these individuals. Conceivably, vaccination of cancer patients with tumor cells expressing high levels of CTAs in combination with regimens that deplete or inhibit T regulatory cells will induce broad immunity to these antigens. In order to examine this issue, patients with primary lung and esophageal cancers, pleural mesotheliomas, thoracic sarcomas, thymic neoplasms and mediastinal germ cell tumors, as well as sarcomas, melanomas, germ cell tumors, or epithelial malignancies metastatic to lungs, pleura or mediastinum with no evidence of disease (NED) or minimal residual disease (MRD) following standard multidisciplinary therapy will be vaccinated with H1299 tumor cell lysates with Iscomatrix adjuvant. Vaccines will be administered with or without metronomic oral cyclophosphamide (50 mg PO BID x 7d q 14d), and celecoxib (400 mg PO BID). Serologic responses to a variety of recombinant CTAs as well as immunologic responses to autologous tumor or epigenetically modified autologous EBVtransformed lymphocytes will be assessed before and after a six month vaccination period. Primary Objectives: 1. To assess the frequency of immunologic responses to CTAs in patients with thoracic malignancies following vaccinations with H1299 cell lysate / Iscomatrix(TM) vaccines alone in comparison to patients with thoracic malignancies following vaccinations with H1299 cell lysate / Iscomatrix vaccines in combination with metronomic cyclophosphamide and celecoxib. Secondary Objectives: 1. To examine if oral metronomic cyclophosphamide and celecoxib therapy diminishes the number and percentage of T regulatory cells and diminishes activity of these cells in patients with thoracic malignancies are at risk of recurrence. 2. To examine if H1299 cell lysate / Iscomatrix(TM) vaccination enhances immunologic response to autologous tumor or epigenetically modified autologous EBV-transformed lymphocytes (B cells). Eligibility: - Patients with histologically or cytologically proven small cell or non-small cell lung cancer (SCLC;NSCLC), esophageal cancer (EsC), malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) , thymic or mediastinal germ cell tumors, thoracic sarcomas, or melanomas, sarcomas, or epithelial malignancies metastatic to lungs, pleura or mediastinum who have no clinical evidence of active disease (NED), or minimal residual disease (MRD) not readily accessible by non-invasive biopsy or resection / radiation following standard therapy completed within the past 26 weeks. - Patients must be 18 years or older with an ECOG performance status of 0 2. - Patients must have adequate bone marrow, kidney, liver, lung and cardiac function. - Patients may not be on systemic immunosuppressive medications at time vaccinations commence. Design: - Following recovery from surgery, chemotherapy, or chemo / XRT, patients with NED or MRD will be vaccinated via IM injection with H1299 cell lysates and Iscomatrix(TM) adjuvant monthly for 6 months. - Vaccines will be administered with or without with metronomic oral cyclophosphamide and celecoxib. - Systemic toxicities and immunologic response to therapy will be recorded. Pre and post vaccination serologic and cell mediated responses to a standard panel of CT antigens as well as autologous tumor cells (if available) and EBV-transformed lymphocytes will be assessed before and after vaccination. - Numbers / percentages and function of T regulatory cells in peripheral blood will be assessed before, during, and after vaccinations. - Patients will be followed in the clinic with routine staging scans until disease recurrence. - The trial will randomize 28 evaluable patients per arm to either receive vaccine alone or vaccine plus chemotherapy in order to have 80% power to determine if the frequency of immune responses on the combination arm exceeds that of the vaccine alone arm, if the expected frequencies of immune responses on the two arms
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • ERK1 / 2 Inhibitor LY3214996 and Abemaciclib for the Treatment of Advanced, Metastatic, or Unresectable Cancer Harboring Mutations in BRAF, RAF1, MEK1 / 2, ERK1 / 2, and NF1

    This phase II trial studies how well ERK1 / 2 inhibitor LY3214996 and abemaciclib work in treating patients with cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced / metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) and harbor the mutations in BRAF, RAF1, MEK1 / 2, ERK1 / 2, and NF1. ERK1 / 2 inhibitor LY3214996 and abemaciclib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Indiana University / Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, Indiana

  • Administering Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Transduced With a Murine T-Cell Receptor Recognizing the G12D Variant of Mutated RAS in HLA-A*11:01 Patients

    Background: A new cancer therapy takes white blood cells from a person, grows them in a lab, genetically changes them, then gives them back to the person. Researchers think this may help attack tumors in people with certain cancers. It is called gene transfer using anti-KRAS G12D mTCR cells. Objective: To see if anti-KRAS G12D mTCR cells are safe and cause tumors to shrink. Eligibility: Adults ages 18-70 who have cancer with a molecule on the tumors that can be recognized by the study cells Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, scans, photography, and heart, lung, and lab tests. An intravenous (IV) catheter will be placed in a large vein in the chest. Participants will have leukapheresis. Blood will be removed through a needle in an arm. A machine will divide the blood and collect white blood cells. The rest of the blood will be returned to the participant through a needle in the other arm. A few weeks later, participants will have a hospital stay. They will: - Get 2 chemotherapy medicines by IV over 5 days. - Get the changed cells through the catheter. Get up to 9 doses of a medicine to help the cells. They may get a shot to stimulate blood cells. - Recover in the hospital for up to 3 weeks. They will provide blood samples. Participants will take an antibiotic for at least 6 months. Participants will have several follow-up visits over 2 years. They will repeat most of the screening tests and may have leukapheresis. Participants blood will be collected for several years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland