Treatment Clinical Trials for Osteosarcoma

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for osteosarcoma treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-36 of 36

  • Losartan and Sunitinib for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Osteosarcoma

    This phase I / Ib trial studies the side effects, best dose, and anti-tumor activity of losartan and sunitinib in treating patients with osteosarcoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Losartan and sunitinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado

  • Hu3F8-BsAb in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Neuroblastoma, Osteosarcoma, or other GD2 Positive Solid Tumors

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of Hu3F8-BsAb, and how well it works in treating patients with neuroblastoma, osteosarcoma, or other GD2 positive solid tumors that have come back or does not respond to treatment. Immunotherapy with Hu3F8-BsAb, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • A Study of EGFR806 CAR T-Cell Immunotherapy for Treating Children and Young Adults with Recurrent / Refractory Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies side effects and best dose of EGFR806-specific and EGFR806xCD19 CAR T cells and how well they work in treating patients with solid tumors that have come back (recurrent) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). T cells are a type of immune cell that can recognize proteins on the surface of other cells and then target and kill cells that have that protein. Some solid tumor cells have an EGFR protein on their surface, and T cells can be modified with a receptor, called a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), to help recognize this protein and kill these tumor cells; this is the treatment in Arm A of this study. In Arm B of this study, researchers will modify T cells to recognize EGFR as well as a protein called CD19; CD19 is present on the surface of a group of normal white blood cells called B cells. Researchers hypothesize that modifying T cells to be directed against CD19 in addition to EGFR may act as an additional signal to help the T cells directed against EGFR to grow better and last longer.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Gemcitabine, Docetaxel, and Hydroxychloroquine in Treating Participants with Recurrent or Refractory Osteosarcoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of hydroxychloroquine and how well it works when given together with gemcitabine and docetaxel in treating participants with osteosarcoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine, docetaxel, and hydroxychloroquine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • LN-145 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Ovarian Cancer, Osteosarcoma, or Other Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    This phase II trial studies how well autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes LN-145 (LN-145) works in treating patients with ovarian cancer, osteosarcoma, or other bone and soft tissue sarcomas that do not respond to treatment (refractory) or that has come back (relapsed). LN-145 is made by collecting and growing specialized white blood cells (called T-cells) that are collected from the patient's tumor. The T cells may specifically recognize, target, and kill the tumor cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Durvalumab for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Central Nervous System Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of durvalumab in treating patients with solid tumors, lymphoma, or central nervous system tumors that have come back (recurrent) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California

  • Genetically Modified Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Zoledronic Acid in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed / Refractory Hematologic Malignancies or High Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of zoledronic acid given after genetically modified donor stem cell transplant in treating younger patients with hematologic malignancies or high risk tumors that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When healthy stem cells from a donor that have been genetically modified are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus after the transplant may stop this from happening. Giving zoledronic acid after the transplant may help strengthen the immune system and make the immune cells work better.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Humanized Monoclonal Antibody 3F8 and Sargramostim in Treating Patients with Recurrent Osteosarcoma

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well humanized monoclonal antibody 3F8 (Hu3F8) and sargramostim work in treating patients with bone cancer (osteosarcoma) that has come back (recurrent). Monoclonal antibodies, such as humanized monoclonal antibody 3F8, may stimulate the immune system and interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Colony-stimulating factors, such as sargramostim, may increase the number of granulocytes (kinds of white blood cells that are able to kill cancer cells). Sargramostim increases the number of other kinds of white blood cells that may help attack tumor cells. Sargramostim may also make humanized monoclonal antibody 3F8 more effective against osteosarcoma. Giving humanized monoclonal antibody 3F8 together with sargramostim may be an effective treatment for patients with osteosarcoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well a donor bone marrow transplant works in treating patients with solid tumors that are likely to recur (come back) or spread. Giving low doses of chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells when they do not exactly match the patient's blood. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Avelumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Progressive Osteosarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well avelumab works in treating patients with osteosarcoma that has come back or is growing, spreading, or getting worse. Monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Nivolumab with or without Ipilimumab in Treating Younger Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Sarcomas

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of nivolumab when given with or without ipilimumab to see how well they work in treating younger patients with solid tumors or sarcomas that have come back (recurrent) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether nivolumab works better alone or with ipilimumab in treating patients with recurrent or refractory solid tumors or sarcomas.
    Location: 24 locations