Treatment Clinical Trials for Osteosarcoma

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for osteosarcoma treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-49 of 49

  • Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients with Oligometastatic Disease

    This phase II trial studies how well stereotactic radiosurgery works in treating patients with cancer that has spread to 5 or fewer places in the body and involves 3 or fewer organs (oligometastatic disease). Stereotactic radiosurgery, also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy, is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers a single, high dose of radiation directly to the tumor and may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Olaparib and Ceralasertib for the Treatment of Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Osteosarcoma with or without Suspected Lung Metastases

    This phase II trial studies the effect of olaparib and ceralasertib in treating patients with osteosarcoma that has come back (recurrent) or has not responded to treatment (refractory) that may or may not have spread to the lungs (suspected lung metastases). Olaparib is an inhibitor of PARP, an enzyme that helps repair deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) when it becomes damaged. Blocking PARP may help keep cancer cells from repairing their damaged DNA, causing them to die. PARP inhibitors are a type of targeted therapy. Ceralasertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving olaparib and ceralasertib may work better than standard treatment, including chemotherapy and / or radiation therapy, in treating patients with osteosarcoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Study of CRX100 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    This clinical study is an open-label, phase 1, dose-escalation study to determine the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of CRX100 in adult subjects with advanced solid tumors. Patients will be screened and evaluated to determine whether or not they meet stated inclusion criteria. Enrolled subjects will undergo leukapheresis to enable the ex vivo generation of autologous cytokine induced killer (CIK) cells. Patients with triple-negative breast cancer, colorectal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, osteosarcoma, epithelial ovarian cancer, and gastric cancer will be considered.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Abemaciclib for Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcoma With Cyclin-Dependent Kinase (CDK) Pathway Alteration

    This is a single-arm, phase II study that will enroll a total of 45 subjects. All subjects will have a confirmed diagnosis of metastatic or unresectable soft tissue sarcoma or bone sarcoma. All subjects must have intact Rb, identified at the time of screening, by immunohistochemistry testing of submitted tumor specimen. Subjects will receive Abemaciclib 200 mg twice daily until progression or discontinuation criteria are met.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Losartan and Sunitinib for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Osteosarcoma

    This phase I / Ib trial studies the side effects, best dose, and anti-tumor activity of losartan and sunitinib in treating patients with osteosarcoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Losartan and sunitinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well a donor bone marrow transplant works in treating patients with solid tumors that are likely to recur (come back) or spread. Giving low doses of chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells when they do not exactly match the patient's blood. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cabozantinib, Topotecan, and Cyclophosphamide for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Ewing Sarcoma or High-Grade Osteosarcoma

    This phase I trial is to find out the best dose, possible benefits, and / or side effects of cabozantinib and how well it works in combination with topotecan and cyclophosphamide in treating patients with Ewing sarcoma or high-grade osteosarcoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Cabozantinib and topotecan may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving cabozantinib, topotecan, and cyclophosphamide may work better than topotecan and cyclophosphamide alone in treating patients with Ewing sarcoma or osteosarcoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • ENB003 Plus Pembrolizumab Phase 1b / 2a in Solid Tumors

    First-in Human study evaluating the safety, tolerability and efficacy of ENB003 in combination with Pembrolizumab in solid tumors. The study is separated into two parts. Part A is a 3+3 dose escalation to define the recommended RP2D; this part will include metastatic melanoma, platinum resistant ovarian cancer, and pancreatic cancer patients subjects, but other solid tumors will be allowed. Once the RP2D is selected, the study will be expanded into metastatic melanoma, platinum resistant ovarian cancer, and pancreatic cancer subjects. A small number of sarcoma subjects will be included, as exploratory.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Study of EGFR806 CAR T-Cell Immunotherapy for Treating Children and Young Adults with Recurrent / Refractory Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies side effects and best dose of EGFR806-specific and EGFR806xCD19 CAR T cells and how well they work in treating patients with solid tumors that have come back (recurrent) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). T cells are a type of immune cell that can recognize proteins on the surface of other cells and then target and kill cells that have that protein. Some solid tumor cells have an EGFR protein on their surface, and T cells can be modified with a receptor, called a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), to help recognize this protein and kill these tumor cells; this is the treatment in Arm A of this study. In Arm B of this study, researchers will modify T cells to recognize EGFR as well as a protein called CD19; CD19 is present on the surface of a group of normal white blood cells called B cells. Researchers hypothesize that modifying T cells to be directed against CD19 in addition to EGFR may act as an additional signal to help the T cells directed against EGFR to grow better and last longer.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • LN-145 or LN-145-S1 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Ovarian Cancer, Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer, Osteosarcoma, or Other Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    This phase II trial studies how well autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes LN-145 (LN-145) or LN-145-S1 works in treating patients with ovarian cancer, anaplastic thyroid cancer, osteosarcoma, or other bone and soft tissue sarcomas that do not respond to treatment (refractory) or that has come back (relapsed). LN-145 is made by collecting and growing specialized white blood cells (called T-cells) that are collected from the patient's tumor. LN-145-S1 is made using a modified process that chooses a specific portion of the T-cells. The T cells may specifically recognize, target, and kill the tumor cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Study of CB-103 in Adult Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumours and Haematological Malignancies

    This is a phase I / II, non randomized, open-label, dose escalation study to investigate the safety, tolerability and preliminary efficacy of CB-103.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Durvalumab for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Central Nervous System Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of durvalumab in treating patients with solid tumors, lymphoma, or central nervous system tumors that have come back (recurrent) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California

  • Genetically Modified Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Zoledronic Acid in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed / Refractory Hematologic Malignancies or High Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of zoledronic acid given after genetically modified donor stem cell transplant in treating younger patients with hematologic malignancies or high risk tumors that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When healthy stem cells from a donor that have been genetically modified are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus after the transplant may stop this from happening. Giving zoledronic acid after the transplant may help strengthen the immune system and make the immune cells work better.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Humanized 3F8 Bispecific Antibody (Hu3F8-BsAb) in Patients With Relapsed / Refractory Neuroblastoma, Osteosarcoma and Other Solid Tumor Cancers

    The purpose of this study is to test the safety of a study drug called humanized 3F8 bispecific antibody (Hu3F8-BsAb).
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Modified Immune Cells (Autologous iC9.GD2.CAR.IL-15 T cells) for Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory High Risk Neuroblastoma, Ganglioneuroblastoma, or Osteosarcoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of modified immune cells (autologous iC9.GD2.CAR.IL-15 T cells) for treating patients with high risk neuroblastoma or osteosarcoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory), or ganglioneuroblastoma. Antibodies and T cells are two different ways the body fights disease. When T cells have part of an antibody attached to them they are better at recognizing and killing tumor cells. The treatment that is being research on this trial, autologous iC9.GD2.CAR.IL-15 T cells, combines T cells and antibodies in order to create a more effective treatment. An antibody called anti-GD2 joins to T cells in the blood and can detect and stick to neuroblastoma cells because they have a substance on the outside of them called GD2. The IL-15 gene, which cells use to communicate with one another, is added so that the T cells can attack tumor cells more effectively. The iC9 gene is added as an "off-switch" so that it can stop the T cells from working if serious side effects are experienced. This study is being done to see if giving autologous iC9.GD2.CAR.IL-15 T cells is safe, tolerable, and helpful in treating neuroblastoma, ganglioneuroblastoma, or osteosarcoma.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • CycloSam and External Beam Radiotherapy for the Treatment of High Risk Osteosarcoma and Other Solid Tumors Metastatic to Bone

    This phase I trial is to find the best dose of CycloSam when given together with external bean radiotherapy in treating patients with high risk osteosarcoma or other solid tumors that have spread to the bone (metastatic). CycloSam may deliver radiation to multiple sites of bone disease simultaneously. Radiation therapy uses high energy beams to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Osteosarcoma can be damaged by this kind of radiation, but that requires very high doses, which can cause severe damage to the healthy skin and tissues in the area. CycloSam is a form of radiation that is given through a vein into the bloodstream. This drug delivers radiation right to the bone tumor, without causing damage to the outside of the skin or to other organs. This trial aims to see whether giving CycloSam and external bean radiotherapy together may provide enough radiation to damage the tumor, without causing as much skin and tissue damage as external beam radiation alone, and whether radiation given in this way will stop or reverse the growth of osteosarcoma and other solid tumors.
    Location: Montefiore Medical Center-Weiler Hospital, Bronx, New York

  • Gemcitabine, Docetaxel, and Hydroxychloroquine in Treating Participants with Recurrent or Refractory Osteosarcoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of hydroxychloroquine and how well it works when given together with gemcitabine and docetaxel in treating participants with osteosarcoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine, docetaxel, and hydroxychloroquine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Testing the Combination of Two Immunotherapy Drugs (Magrolimab and Dinutuximab) in Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Neuroblastoma or Relapsed Osteosarcoma

    This phase I trial is to find out the best dose, possible benefits and / or side effects of magrolimab in combination with dinutuximab in treating patients with neuroblastoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory) or relapsed osteosarcoma. Magrolimab and dinutuximab are monoclonal antibodies that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. The combination of magrolimab and dinutuximab may shrink or stabilize relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma or relapsed osteosarcoma. In addition, this trial may help researchers find out if it is safe to give magrolimab and dinutuximab after surgery to remove tumors from the lungs.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • A Study of ZN-c3 in Combination With Gemcitabine in Subjects With Osteosarcoma

    This is a phase 1 / 2 study of ZN-c3 in combination with gemcitabine in adult and pediatric subjects with relapsed or refractory osteosarcoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Oleclumab and Durvalumab for the Treatment of Recurrent, Refractory, or Metastatic Sarcoma

    This phase II trial investigates how well oleclumab and durvalumab work in treating patients with sarcoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as oleclumab and durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Sirolimus and Metronomic Chemotherapy for the Treatment of High-Risk Solid Tumors in Children, AflacST1903 Study

    This phase II trial studies how well sirolimus together with repetitive, low doses of chemotherapy (metronomic chemotherapy) works in treating children with high-risk solid tumors. Sirolimus is used to decrease the body's immune response. Chemotherapy drugs, such as etoposide and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Celecoxib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving sirolimus together with chemotherapy may help stop tumor growth by preventing blood from getting to the tumor and ultimately prevent the tumor from coming back.
    Location: Emory University Hospital / Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia

  • Testing a New Immune Cell Therapy, GD2-Targeted Modified T-cells (GD2CART), in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults with Relapsed / Refractory Osteosarcoma and Neuroblastoma, The GD2-CAR PERSIST Trial

    This phase I trial investigates the side effects and determines the best dose of an immune cell therapy called GD2CART, as well as how well it works in treating patients with osteosarcoma or neuroblastoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). T cells are infection fighting blood cells that can kill tumor cells. The T cells given in this trial will come from the patient and will have a new gene put in them that makes them able to recognize GD2, a protein on the surface of tumor cells. These GD2-specific T cells may help the body's immune system identify and kill GD2 positive tumor cells.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Ulixertinib in Treating Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders with MAPK Pathway Mutations (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well ulixertinib works in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body (advanced), non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders that have a genetic alteration (mutation) in a signaling pathway called MAPK. A signaling pathway consists of a group of molecules in a cell that control one or more cell functions. Genes in the MAPK pathway are frequently mutated in many types of cancers. Ulixertinib may stop the growth of cancer cells that have mutations in the MAPK pathway.
    Location: 109 locations

  • Ex-Vivo Expanded and Activated Donor NK Cells and Hu14.18-IL2 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Neuroblastoma or Osteosarcoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of ex-vivo expanded and activated donor NK cells and hu14.18-IL2 in treating patients with neuroblastoma or osteosarcoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Expanded and activated donor NK cells may be able to kill the cancer cells better. Hu14.18-IL2 binds to NK cells and may be able to activate them, improving their ability to stay alive, multiply, and kill cancer cells. Giving ex-vivo expanded and activated donor NK cells and hu14.18-IL2 may work better in treating patients with neuroblastoma or osteosarcoma.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin