Treatment Clinical Trials for Pancreatic Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for pancreatic cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 226-245 of 245
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  • Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor M7824 and the Immunocytokine M9241 in Combination With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) in Adults With Advanced Pancreas Cancer

    Background: Fewer than 10 percent of people with pancreas cancer can have surgery. Surgery gives the best outcome. Radiation therapy is usually used to make surgery possible. But it does not work for most people. Adding immunotherapy might help. Objective: To find a safe combined dose of M7824, M9241, and radiation and to see if it causes pancreas cancer tumors to shrink. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older who have pancreas cancer and cannot have curative surgery Design: Participants will be screened under protocol 01-C-0129 with: Medical history Physical exam Heart, urine, and blood tests Scans. For this, participants will lie in a machine that takes pictures of the body. They may receive a contrast agent by vein. Possible tumor biopsy Participants will take the study drugs either alone or with radiation. They will get M7824 by vein every 2 weeks. They will get M9241 injected under the skin every 4 weeks. Participants who get radiation will get it 5 days in a row the first month. Participants will have visits every 2 weeks. They will repeat screening tests. If participants tumors shrink, they will have surgery. If their whole tumor is removed, they will stop treatment. They will otherwise continue treatment as long as they can tolerate it and it is helping them. Participants will have visits 1 week and 1 month after they stop treatment. Then they will be contacted by phone or email for life. If they stop treatment for a reason other than their disease getting worse, they will have scans every 12 weeks.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Gemcitabine, Nab-Paclitaxel, and Bosentan for the Treatment of Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of bosentan and how well it works when given together with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel for the treatment of pancreatic cancer that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Bosentan may block the hormone endothelin and prevent the growth and spread of pancreatic cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving bosentan with chemotherapy (gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel) may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Liposomal Irinotecan in Combination With Oxaliplatin, Leucovorin, and 5-fluorouracil for Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma:

    This is a phase II, single-arm, open-label, clinical study to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of a combination of liposomal irinotecan (nal-IRI) with oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and 5-fluorouracil (FOLFOX-nal-IRI) for treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC).
    Location: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey

  • Measuring the Effects of Talazoparib in Patients with Advanced Cancer and DNA Repair Variations

    This phase II trial identifies if talazoparib works in tumor cells and if it works differently in patients with cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced) who have or have not already been treated with another poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor. Talazoparib is a type of drug called a PARP inhibitor that works by preventing DNA repair in tumor cells. This trial may help scientists learn if some patients might benefit from taking different PARP inhibitors “one after the other" and understand how PARP inhibitors work in treating patients with advanced cancer.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Testing the Addition of Pembrolizumab, an Immunotherapy Cancer Drug to Olaparib Alone as Therapy for Patients with Pancreatic Cancer That Has Spread with Unhealthy Tumor Suppressor Genes

    This phase II trial investigates how well pembrolizumab and olaparib work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer with germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). PARPs are proteins that help repair deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mutations. PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, can keep PARP from working, so tumor cells can't repair themselves, and they may stop growing. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. The addition of pembrolizumab to the usual treatment of olaparib may help to shrink the tumors in patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Testing the Addition of an Anti-cancer Drug, BAY 1895344, to Usual Chemotherapy for Advanced Stage Solid Tumors, with a Specific Focus on Patients with Small Cell Lung Cancer, Poorly Differentiated Neuroendocrine Cancer, and Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I trial investigates the side effects and best dose of BAY 1895344 when given together with usual chemotherapy (irinotecan liposome or topotecan) in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body (advanced), with a specific focus on small cell lung cancer, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine cancer, and pancreatic cancer. BAY 1895344 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as irinotecan liposome and topotecan, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Adding BAY 1895344 to irinotecan liposome or topotecan may help to slow the growth of tumors for longer than seen with those drugs alone.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Binimetinib and Encorafenib for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer in Patients with a Somatic BRAF V600E Mutation

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well the combination of binimetinib and encorafenib work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer with a somatic BRAF V600E mutation. Binimetinib and encorafenib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving binimetinib and encorafenib may work better compared to the usual treatment in treating patients with pancreatic cancer and a somatic BRAF V600E mutation.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Nivolumab in Combination with Chemotherapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies how well nivolumab and combination chemotherapy work before surgery in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that could possibly be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, leucovorin calcium and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab in combination with chemotherapy before surgery may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Niraparib and Dostarlimab for the Treatment of Germline or Somatic BRCA1 / 2 and PALB2 Mutated Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well niraparib and dostarlimab work in treating patients with germline or somatic BRCA1 / 2 and PALB2 mutated pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Niraparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as dostarlimab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving niraparib and dostarlimab may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Belinostat in Combination with Nivolumab Alone and with Ipilimumab for the Treatment of Unresectable, Locally Advanced, Advanced, or Metastatic Cancer

    This phase I trial identifies the side effects and best dose of belinostat in combination with nivolumab alone and with ipilimumab in treating patients with cancer that is cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) and has spread to nearby tissues or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or has spread to other places in the body (advanced or metastatic). Belinostat is a potential anti‐cancer drug, known as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which means that belinostat stops the activity of HDAC enzymes (an enzyme is a protein that in small amounts can speed up a biological reaction). Dysfunctional HDAC activity can lead to the uncontrolled growth of tumor cells. Nivolumab and ipilimumab are types of immunotherapy. Nivolumab works by attaching to and blocking a molecule called PD-1, a protein that is present on different types of cells in the immune system and controls parts of the immune system by shutting it down. Ipilimumab is an antibody that attaches itself to toxic substances (antigens) that cause the body to have an immune response and blocks immune tolerance. It is not yet known if giving belinostat in combination with nivolumab alone and with ipilimumab will work better in treating patients with cancer.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Digoxin for the Treatment of Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase IIa trial studies how well neoadjuvant chemotherapy and digoxin work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery (resectable). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, irinotecan, leucovorin calcium, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Digoxin may improve cancer drugs effect and slow tumor growth. Given neoadjuvant chemotherapy and digoxin together may work better in treating patients with resectable pancreatic cancer compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska

  • A Vaccine (Ad5.F35-hGCC-PADRE) for the Treatment of Gastrointestinal Adenocarcinoma

    This phase IIA trial investigates the side effects of Ad5.F35-hGCC-PADRE vaccine and to see how well it works in treating patients with gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma. Ad5.F35-hGCC-PADRE vaccine may help to train the patient's own immune system to identify and kill tumor cells and prevent it from coming back.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • iExosomes in Treating Participants with Metastatic Pancreas Cancer with KrasG12D Mutation

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of mesenchymal stromal cells-derived exosomes with KrasG12D siRNA (iExosomes) in treating participants with pancreatic cancer with KrasG12D mutation that has spread to other places in the body. iExosomes may work better at treating pancreatic cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Lonsurf, Gemcitabine, and Nab-Paclitaxel for the Treatment of Patients with Advanced Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of Lonsurf, gemcitabine, and nab-paclitaxel in treating patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma that has spread from where it first started to nearby tissue, lymph nodes, or distant parts of the body (advanced). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as Lonsurf, gemcitabine, and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Indiana University / Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, Indiana

  • Modified FOLFIRINOX and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Patients with Non-Metastatic Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well the combination of chemotherapy drugs called FOLFIRINOX (levoleucovorin or leucovorin, 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan and oxaliplatin) followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has not spread to other places in the body (non-metastatic) and cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Chemotherapy drugs, such as levoleucovorin or leucovorin, 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a radiation therapy approach which delivers high dose radiation to a tumor in the body in a single treatment session or up to 5 treatment sessions (one dose per day). Giving chemotherapy with stereotactic body radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Neoadjuvant Paricalcitol in Treating Patients with Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies how well paricalcitol before primary treatment works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paricalcitol, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Danvatirsen and Durvalumab in Treating Patients with Advanced and Refractory Pancreatic, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, and Mismatch Repair Deficient Colorectal Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well danvatirsen and durvalumab work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer, non-small cell lung cancer and mismatch repair deficient colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced) and does not respond to treatment (refractory). Danvatirsen may be used to block the production of proteins needed for tumor cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving danvatirsen and durvalumab may work better at treating pancreatic cancer, non-small cell lung cancer and mismatch repair deficient colorectal cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Gemcitabine and Nab-Paclitaxel with or without Pharmacological Ascorbate in Treating Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel with or without pharmacological ascorbate works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Pharmacological ascorbate may change the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known how pharmacological ascorbate will affect the effectiveness of chemotherapy.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Sorafenib Tosylate, Vorinostat, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of sorafenib tosylate and vorinostat when given together with gemcitabine hydrochloride and radiation therapy in treating patients with pancreatic cancer. Sorafenib tosylate and vorinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving sorafenib tosylate, vorinostat, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and radiation therapy may be a better treatment for pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Virginia Commonwealth University / Massey Cancer Center, Richmond, Virginia

  • Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Capecitabine before Surgery in Treating Patients with Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of stereotactic body radiation therapy when given together with capecitabine before surgery in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a specialized radiation therapy that sends x-rays directly to the tumor using smaller doses over several days and may cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving stereotactic body radiation therapy and capecitabine before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin


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