Treatment Clinical Trials for Pancreatic Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for pancreatic cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 201-219 of 219
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  • Second-line Study of PEGPH20 and Pembro for HA High Metastatic PDAC

    This study is the study of the combination of PEGPH20 and Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) for patients with previously treated Hyaluronan High (HA-high) metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. This study is an interventional, unblinded, open label study. Approximately 35 subjects will be enrolled. The trial will require approximately a total of 18 months, including 12 months for enrollment, with an additional 6 months for patient follow-up, data collection and study closure. Each subject will participate in the trial from the time the subject signs the Informed Consent Form (ICF) through the final contact. After a screening phase of up to 21 days, eligible subjects will receive PEGPH20 beginning with Cycle 1 Day 1, on Days 1, 8 15 of every 3 week-cycles and pembrolizumab beginning on Cycle 1 Day 1 (2-4 hrs after PEGPH20), every 3-week-cycles. Treatment with PEGPH20 and pembrolizumab will continue until progressive disease (PD), unacceptable adverse events (AEs), intercurrent illness that prevents further administration of treatment, investigator's decision to withdraw the subject, subject withdraws consent, pregnancy of the subject, noncompliance with trial treatment or procedure requirements, subject receives 35 treatments (approximately 24 months) of pembrolizumab, or administrative reasons requiring cessation of treatment. Subjects who discontinue for reasons other than PD will have post-treatment follow-up for disease status until PD, initiating a non-study cancer treatment, withdrawing consent, or becoming lost to follow-up. All subjects will be followed by telephone for overall survival (OS) until death, withdrawal of consent, or the end of the study. After the end of treatment, each subject will be followed for 30 days for AE monitoring. Serious adverse events (SAE) and events of clinical interest (ECI) will be collected for 90 days after the end of treatment or for 30 days after the end of treatment if the subject initiates new anticancer therapy, whichever is earlier.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • A Study of Safety, Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of JNJ-64457107 in Participants With Advanced Stage Tumors

    The primary purpose of the study is to determine the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) and schedule of JNJ-64457107 when administered intravenously (IV) to participants with advanced stage solid tumors in Part 1 and to further characterize the safety of JNJ-64457107 when administered IV to participants with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), pancreatic cancer and cutaneous melanoma in Part 2.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Preoperative Biliary Drainage in Resectable Pancreatic or Periampullary Cancer

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that preoperative biliary drainage using self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) does not negatively impact overall surgical outcomes in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy for treatment of pancreatic or periampullary cancer.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • An Open-Label Study to Enable Continued Treatment Access for Subjects Previously Enrolled in Studies of Ruxolitinib

    The purpose of this study is to provide continued supply of ruxolitinib alone, ruxolitinib plus background cancer therapy, or background cancer therapy alone to subjects from an Incyte-sponsored study of ruxolitinib that has reached its study objectives or has been terminated. This study will also provide another mechanism for reporting adverse events related to study drug safety.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Study of Eryaspase in Combination With Chemotherapy Versus Chemotherapy Alone as 2nd-Line Treatment in PDAC

    This is an open-label, multicenter, randomized, Phase 3 study in patients with ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas who have failed only one prior line of systemic anti-cancer therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer and have measurable disease.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Study of eFT226 in Subjects With Selected Advanced Solid Tumor Malignancies

    This clinical trial is a Phase 1-2, open-label, sequential-group, dose-escalation and cohort-expansion study evaluating the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics, and antitumor activity of eFT226 in subjects with selected advanced solid tumor malignancies. The study will evaluate weekly 1-hour intravenous (IV) administration of eFT226. Treatment and study subject evaluations will be performed in 21 day cycles.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • A Study of Creon (Pancrelipase) in Resected and Non-resected Pancreatic Cancer Participants With Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency (EPI)

    This is a study in participants with Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency (EPI) due to pancreatic cancer that has been resected. This study will include resected participants who are post pancreatic cancer surgery, and an exploratory cohort in non-resected participants.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Biologically Optimized Infusion Schedule of Gemcitabine and Nab-Paclitaxel for the Treatment of Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well a biologically optimized infusion schedule of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Altering the timing of the nab-paclitaxel infusion may improve response in patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Sonidegib and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of sonidegib when given together with pembrolizumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with solid tumor that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Sonidegib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving sonidegib and pembrolizumab may work better than standard treatment in treating patients with advanced solid tumors.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Nivolumab in Combination with Chemotherapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies how well nivolumab and combination chemotherapy work before surgery in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that could possibly be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, leucovorin calcium and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab in combination with chemotherapy before surgery may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Neoantigen Peptide Vaccine for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and how well an individualized peptide vaccine called neoantigen peptide vaccine works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer following surgery and post surgery chemotherapy treatment. Neoantigen peptide vaccine include up to 20 peptides as well as a dose of a drug called poly-ICLC, which is a medication that improves the activity of the vaccine. A peptide is a naturally occurring biological molecule made up of amino acids. The individualized peptide vaccine is designed to target mutations specific to each patient’s tumor that are discovered during genetic testing of the tumor before study procedures start. Injection of this vaccine may be a way to generate an immune response to pancreatic cancer cells. An immune response is the way the body fights viruses and other infections. There is evidence that an immune response may be a way to fight cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Entinostat and the FOLFOX Chemotherapy Regimen in Treating Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies the best dose of entinostat when given together with the standard of care FOLFOX chemotherapy regimen in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Entinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in the FOLFOX chemotherapy regimen, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving the standard FOLFOX regimen together with entinostat may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer compared to the FOLFOX regimen alone.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • iExosomes in Treating Participants with Metastatic Pancreas Cancer with KrasG12D Mutation

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of mesenchymal stromal cells-derived exosomes with KrasG12D siRNA (iExosomes) in treating participants with pancreatic cancer with KrasG12D mutation that has spread to other places in the body. iExosomes may work better at treating pancreatic cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • M7824 (MSB0011359C) in Combination With Gemcitabine in Adults With Previously Treated Advanced Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    Background: Pancreas cancer ranks 4th in all cancer-related deaths in the U.S. Gemcitabine is a standard treatment for it. M7824 blocks a pathway that prevents the immune system from effectively fighting cancer. The two drugs together might help people with pancreas cancer. Objective: To test if giving M7824 together with gemcitabine is safe and causes tumors to shrink. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with pancreatic cancer already treated with standard therapies Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Scans in a machine that takes pictures of the body Blood, urine, and heart tests Some participants may have a tumor sample removed. Participants will get M7824 by IV once every 2 weeks. They will continue until their disease gets worse or they have unacceptable side effects. In addition they will get Participants will get gemcitabine by IV once weekly for 7 weeks. Then they will get it as follows for up to 6 months: Skip 1 week, get the drug once a week for 3 weeks, skip 1 week. . Before treatment on the first day of each cycle, participants will repeat screening tests. They will also have: Optional tumor biopsies before and after 3 cycles of therapy Questions about their well-being and function Genetic testing of tissue and blood samples Participants will have a follow-up visit 4 5 weeks after they stop therapy. This includes a physical exam, blood and urine tests, and maybe a scan. If their disease does not get worse, they will be invited for scans every 12 weeks.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Neoadjuvant Paricalcitol in Treating Patients with Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies how well paricalcitol before primary treatment works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paricalcitol, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Nivolumab, Ipilimumab, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Colorectal or Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab, ipilimumab, and radiation therapy work in treating patients with colorectal or pancreatic cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving nivolumab and ipilimumab in combination with radiation therapy may produce an immune response to stop tumor cells from growing in patients with colorectal or pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, leucovorin calcium and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving combination chemotherapy followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with Rare Tumors

    This phase II trial studies nivolumab and ipilimumab in treating patients with rare tumors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial enrolls participants for the following cohorts based on condition: 1. Epithelial tumors of nasal cavity, sinuses, nasopharynx: A) Squamous cell carcinoma with variants of nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx and trachea (excluding laryngeal, nasopharyngeal cancer [NPC], and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck [SCCHN]) B) Adenocarcinoma and variants of nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx (closed to accrual 07 / 27 / 2018) 2. Epithelial tumors of major salivary glands (closed to accrual 03 / 20 / 2018) 3. Salivary gland type tumors of head and neck, lip, esophagus, stomach, trachea and lung, breast and other location (closed to accrual) 4. Undifferentiated carcinoma of gastrointestinal (GI) tract 5. Adenocarcinoma with variants of small intestine (closed to accrual 05 / 10 / 2018) 6. Squamous cell carcinoma with variants of GI tract (stomach small intestine, colon, rectum, pancreas) (closed to accrual 10 / 17 / 2018) 7. Fibromixoma and low grade mucinous adenocarcinoma (pseudomixoma peritonei) of the appendix and ovary (closed to accrual 03 / 20 / 2018) 8. Rare pancreatic tumors including acinar cell carcinoma, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma or serous cystadenocarcinoma. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is not eligible 9. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (closed to accrual 03 / 20 / 2018) 10. Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and bile duct tumors (closed to accrual 03 / 20 / 2018) 11. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of lung 12. Bronchoalveolar carcinoma lung. This condition is now also referred to as adenocarcinoma in situ, minimally invasive adenocarcinoma, lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma, or invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma 13. Non-epithelial tumors of the ovary: A) Germ cell tumor of ovary B) Mullerian mixed tumor and adenosarcoma (closed to accrual 03 / 30 / 2018) 14. Trophoblastic tumor: A) Choriocarcinoma (closed to accrual 04 / 15 / 2019) 15. Transitional cell carcinoma other than that of the renal, pelvis, ureter, or bladder (closed to accrual 04 / 15 / 2019) 16. Cell tumor of the testes and extragonadal germ tumors: A) Seminoma and testicular sex cord cancer B) Non-seminomatous tumor C) Teratoma with malignant transformation (closed to accrual 3 / 15 / 2019) 17. Epithelial tumors of penis - squamous adenocarcinoma cell carcinoma with variants of penis 18. Squamous cell carcinoma variants of the genitourinary (GU) system 19. Spindle cell carcinoma of kidney, pelvis, ureter 20. Adenocarcinoma with variants of GU system (excluding prostate cancer) (closed to accrual 07 / 27 / 2018) 21. Odontogenic malignant tumors 22. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) (formerly named: Endocrine carcinoma of pancreas and digestive tract.) 23. Neuroendocrine carcinoma including carcinoid of the lung (closed to accrual 12 / 19 / 2017) 24. Pheochromocytoma, malignant 25. Paraganglioma (closed to accrual 11 / 29 / 2018) 26. Carcinomas of pituitary gland, thyroid gland parathyroid gland and adrenal cortex 27. Desmoid tumors 28. Peripheral nerve sheath tumors and NF1-related tumors (closed to accrual 09 / 19 / 2018) 29. Malignant giant cell tumors 30. Chordoma (closed to accrual 11 / 29 / 2018) 31. Adrenal cortical tumors (closed to accrual 06 / 27 / 2018) 32. Tumor of unknown primary (Cancer of Unknown Primary; CuP) (closed to accrual 12 / 22 / 2017) 33. Not Otherwise Categorized (NOC) Rare Tumors [To obtain permission to enroll in the NOC cohort, contact: S1609SC@swog.org] (closed to accrual 03 / 15 / 2019) 34. Adenoid cystic carcinoma (closed to accrual 02 / 06 / 2018) 35. Vulvar cancer 36. MetaPLASTIC carcinoma (of the breast) 37. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) (closed to accrual 09 / 26 / 2018) 38. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) 39. Apocrine tumors / extramammary Paget’s disease 40. Peritoneal mesothelioma 41. Basal cell carcinoma 42. Clear cell cervical cancer 43. Esthenioneuroblastoma 44. Endometrial carcinosarcoma (malignant mixed Mullerian tumors) (closed to accrual) 45. Clear cell cervical endometrial cancer 46. Clear cell ovarian cancer 47. Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) 48. Gallbladder cancer 49. Small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic type 50. PD-L1 amplified tumors 51. Angiosarcoma 52. High-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor [PNET] should be enrolled in Cohort 22; prostatic neuroendocrine carcinomas should be enrolled into Cohort 53). Small cell lung cancer is not eligible 53. Treatment-emergent small-cell neuroendocrine prostate cancer (t-SCNC)
    Location: 878 locations

  • Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Capecitabine before Surgery in Treating Patients with Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of stereotactic body radiation therapy when given together with capecitabine before surgery in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a specialized radiation therapy that sends x-rays directly to the tumor using smaller doses over several days and may cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving stereotactic body radiation therapy and capecitabine before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin


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