Treatment Clinical Trials for Pancreatic Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for pancreatic cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 201-211 of 211
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  • Study of Eryaspase in Combination With Chemotherapy Versus Chemotherapy Alone as 2nd-Line Treatment in PDAC

    This is an open-label, multicenter, randomized, Phase 3 study in patients with ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas who have failed only one prior line of systemic anti-cancer therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer and have measurable disease.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Sonidegib and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of sonidegib when given together with pembrolizumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with solid tumor that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Sonidegib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving sonidegib and pembrolizumab may work better than standard treatment in treating patients with advanced solid tumors.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Cobimetinib or Olaparib in Treating Patients with Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial feasibility study aims to determine how cobimetinib or olaparib works in patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Validation of cobimetinib and olaparib molecular targets will be explored by comparing pre-treatment biopsies with post-treatment resection specimens. This knowledge will help design future biomarker driven trials to determine whether giving cobimetinib or olaparib will work better than standard treatments in patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Nivolumab in Combination with Chemotherapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies how well nivolumab and combination chemotherapy work before surgery in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that could possibly be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, leucovorin calcium and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab in combination with chemotherapy before surgery may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • SOR-C13 in Treating Patients with Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of SOR-C13 in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body and does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as SOR-C13, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • iExosomes in Treating Participants with Metastatic Pancreas Cancer with KrasG12D Mutation

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of mesenchymal stromal cells-derived exosomes with KrasG12D siRNA (iExosomes) in treating participants with pancreatic cancer with KrasG12D mutation that has spread to other places in the body. iExosomes may work better at treating pancreatic cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • CD8+ T Cell Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic Gastrointestinal Tumors

    This phase I pilot trial studies the side effects of cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8)+ T cells in treating patients with gastrointestinal tumors that have spread to other places in the body. Tumor cells and blood are used to help create an adoptive T cell therapy, such as CD8+ T cell therapy, that is individually designed for a patient and may help doctors learn more about genetic changes in the tumor. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving CD8+ T cell therapy and pembrolizumab may work better in treating patients with gastrointestinal tumors.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Neoadjuvant Paricalcitol in Treating Patients with Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies how well paricalcitol before primary treatment works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paricalcitol, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Nivolumab, Ipilimumab, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Colorectal or Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab, ipilimumab, and radiation therapy work in treating patients with colorectal or pancreatic cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving nivolumab and ipilimumab in combination with radiation therapy may produce an immune response to stop tumor cells from growing in patients with colorectal or pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, leucovorin calcium and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving combination chemotherapy followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Bispecific Antibody Armed Activated T-cells with Aldesleukin and Sargramostim in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of bispecific antibody armed activated T-cells when given together with aldesleukin and sargramostim and to see how well they work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or other places in the body (metastatic). Bispecific antibody armed activated T-cells are the patient's own T cells that are coated with a bispecific antibody comprising 2 antibodies chemically joined together. These antibodies have specific targets and binding properties that may give the T cells a greater ability to seek out, attach to, and kill more cancer cells.
    Location: Wayne State University / Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, Michigan


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