Treatment Clinical Trials for Pancreatic Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for pancreatic cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 201-225 of 235

  • Radiation Therapy and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients with Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of radiation therapy and paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation when given together in treating patients with pancreatic cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays and / or protons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving radiation therapy and paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Trametinib and Navitoclax in Treating Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of trametinib and navitoclax and how well they work in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body. Trametinib and navitoclax may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy before and after Surgery in Treating Patients with Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy before and after surgery works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving combination chemotherapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. Giving these treatments after surgery may kill any tumor cells that remain after surgery.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Glufosfamide Versus 5-FU in Second Line Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    The study is designed to assess whether glufosfamide provides additional survival benefit as compared to bolus 5-FU in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer who have already progressed or failed therapy on a gemcitabine based first line regimen.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Covered Metal Stents versus Uncovered Metal Stents for the Treatment of Jaundice due to Pancreatic Cancer, Cholangiocarcinoma, or Other Metastatic Malignancies

    This trial studies how well covered metal stents versus uncovered metal stents work in treating patients with jaundice due to pancreatic cancer, cholangiocarcinoma (bile duct), or other malignancies that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Jaundice can make the skin and urine appear very yellow and cause itching throughout the body. Pancreatic cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, or other metastatic malignancies can cause jaundice by blocking the bile duct. The bile duct is a tube-like structure that drains the liver. To maintain an opening in the bile duct, a stent is placed. Uncovered self-expanding metal biliary stents have a bare metal scaffold that the tissue tends to grow into and thus blocks the stent from draining, while covered self-expanding metal biliary stents have a polyurethane coating that may prevent the tissue from growing into the stent and thus blocking the stent. It is not yet known whether covered or uncovered metal stents may work better in treating patients with jaundice.
    Location: Vanderbilt University / Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee

  • Veliparib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of veliparib when given together with combination chemotherapy and to see how well it works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and leucovorin calcium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving veliparib and combination chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia

  • Combined Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of a combined vaccine therapy and to see how well it works in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). The cancer vaccine is made up of two proteins (that look like the tumor cells) mixed up with a special compound that may help train and boost the immune system to recognize and fight the tumor cells.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Vaccine Therapy and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well vaccine therapy and cyclophosphamide work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer. Vaccines may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Cyclophosphamide may also stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Giving vaccine therapy together with cyclophosphamide may be an effective treatment for pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Study of Relacorilant in Combination With Nab-Paclitaxel in Patients With Metastatic Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    This is a Phase 3 study to evaluate the objective response rate (ORR), in patients with metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma treated with relacorilant in combination with nab-paclitaxel, according to blinded independent central review.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Metarrestin (ML-246) in Subjects With Metastatic Solid Tumors

    Background: Metastasis is the spread of cancer from one organ to a nonadjacent organ. It causes 90% of cancer deaths. No treatment specifically prevents or reduces metastasis. Researchers hope a new drug can help. It stops cancer cells from growing and spreading further and possibly shrink cancer lesions in distant organs. Objective: To find a safe dose of metarrestin and to see if this dose shrinks tumors. Eligibility: Adults age 18 and older with pancreatic cancer, breast cancer, or a solid tumor that has not been cured by standard therapies. Also, children age 12-17 with a solid tumor (other than a muscle tumor) with no standard therapy options. Design: Participants will be screened with: - blood tests - physical exam - documentation of disease confirmation or tumor biopsy - electrocardiogram to evaluate the heart - review of their medicines and their ability to do their normal activities Participants will take metarrestin by mouth until they cannot tolerate it or stop to benefit from it. They will keep a medicine diary. Participants will visit the Clinical Center. During the first month there are two brief hospital stays required with visits weekly or every other week thereafter. They will repeat some of the screening tests. They will fill out questionnaires. They will have tests of their cognitive function. They will have an electroencephalogram to record brain activity. They will have a computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A CT is a series of X-rays of the body. An MRI uses magnets and radio waves to take pictures of the body. Adult participants may have tumor biopsies. Participants will have a follow-up visit 30 days after treatment ends. Then they will have follow-up phone calls or emails every 6 months for the rest of their life or until the study ends.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Study of PF‑06940434 in Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors.

    Open-label, multi-center, non-randomized, multiple dose, safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamics and clinical activity study of PF-06940434 in patients with SCCHN (Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck), renal cell carcinoma (RCC - clear cell and papillary), ovarian, gastric, esophageal, esophageal (adeno and squamous), lung squamous cell, pancreatic and biliary duct, endometrial, melanoma and urothelial tumors. This study contains two parts, single agent dose escalation (Part 1A), dose finding of PF 06940434 in combination with anti-PD-1 (Part 1B), biopsy cohorts with monotherapy lead-in at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or maximum administered dose (MAD), followed by combination of anti-PD-1 [PF-06801591] (Part 1C) followed by dose expansion (Part 2). Part 2 Dose Combination Expansion will enroll participants into 2 cohorts at doses determined from Part 1B in order to further evaluate the safety of PF-06940434 in combination with anti-PD-1.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • A Study to Evaluate Safety, Tolerability and Preliminary Efficacy of FP-1305 in Cancer Patients

    This is a first in human study to identify whether FP-1305 is suitable to use in humans. The previous pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that FP-1305 binds to a receptor known as CLEVER-1. CLEVER-1 has been shown to support tumour growth. No significant adverse events were witnessed in primates and the dose used will be 300 fold lower than the dose provided to primates which showed no toxicity. The patients with advanced melanoma, uveal melanoma, cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancer, ER+ breast, gastric, ovarian, pancreatic, colorectal or liver cancer who have exhausted all licenced therapeutic options will die due to their disease. Based on the investigator's existing data CLEVER-1 is expressed in these tumour types. Inhibition of CLEVER-1 with FP-1305 may have an anti-tumour effect in these patients.
    Location: Cancer Therapy and Research Center at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas

  • Second-line Study of PEGPH20 and Pembro for HA High Metastatic PDAC

    This study is the study of the combination of PEGPH20 and Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) for patients with previously treated Hyaluronan High (HA-high) metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. This study is an interventional, unblinded, open label study. Approximately 35 subjects will be enrolled. The trial will require approximately a total of 18 months, including 12 months for enrollment, with an additional 6 months for patient follow-up, data collection and study closure. Each subject will participate in the trial from the time the subject signs the Informed Consent Form (ICF) through the final contact. After a screening phase of up to 21 days, eligible subjects will receive PEGPH20 beginning with Cycle 1 Day 1, on Days 1, 8 15 of every 3 week-cycles and pembrolizumab beginning on Cycle 1 Day 1 (2-4 hrs after PEGPH20), every 3-week-cycles. Treatment with PEGPH20 and pembrolizumab will continue until progressive disease (PD), unacceptable adverse events (AEs), intercurrent illness that prevents further administration of treatment, investigator's decision to withdraw the subject, subject withdraws consent, pregnancy of the subject, noncompliance with trial treatment or procedure requirements, subject receives 35 treatments (approximately 24 months) of pembrolizumab, or administrative reasons requiring cessation of treatment. Subjects who discontinue for reasons other than PD will have post-treatment follow-up for disease status until PD, initiating a non-study cancer treatment, withdrawing consent, or becoming lost to follow-up. All subjects will be followed by telephone for overall survival (OS) until death, withdrawal of consent, or the end of the study. After the end of treatment, each subject will be followed for 30 days for AE monitoring. Serious adverse events (SAE) and events of clinical interest (ECI) will be collected for 90 days after the end of treatment or for 30 days after the end of treatment if the subject initiates new anticancer therapy, whichever is earlier.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Study of MK-4830 as Monotherapy and in Combination With Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors (MK-4830-001)

    This study will determine the safety and tolerability and establish a preliminary recommended Phase 2 dose of MK-4830 administered as monotherapy and in combination with pembrolizumab (MK-3475) in participants with advanced solid tumors; determine the safety and tolerability for the combination of MK-4830 with pembrolizumab + carboplatin / pemetrexed in participants with non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), and MK-4830 in combination with pembrolizumab + lenvatinib in renal cell cancer; and to evaluate objective response rate (ORR) in participants with advanced solid tumors treated with MK-4830 in combination with pembrolizumab.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Immunotherapy Study of Evofosfamide in Combination With Ipilimumab

    An immunotherapy study combining ipilimumab and evofosfamide for the treatment of patients with confirmed metastatic or locally advanced prostate cancer, metastatic pancreatic cancer, melanoma or human papillomavirus (HPV) negative squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck that have failed to respond to standard therapy, progressed despite standard therapy, for which standard therapy does not offer the potential for increased survival.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • A Study of Anti-PD-L1 Checkpoint Antibody (LY3300054) Alone and in Combination in Participants With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors

    The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of anti-programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) checkpoint antibody LY3300054 in participants with advanced refractory solid tumors.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Study of FF-10502-01 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors and Lymphomas

    A Phase 1 / 2a, dose-escalation study of FF-10502-01 in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors and Lymphomas. A total of up to 9 cohorts will be enrolled in Phase 1 to establish the MTD. Phase 2 will consist of 2 cohorts: Cohort 1 will include subjects with Pancreatic Cancer. Cohort 2 will include subjects with another tumor type enrolled in the Phase 1 dose-escalation phase who have demonstrated Clinical Benefit by Week 16.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Preoperative Biliary Drainage in Resectable Pancreatic or Periampullary Cancer

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that preoperative biliary drainage using self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) does not negatively impact overall surgical outcomes in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy for treatment of pancreatic or periampullary cancer.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • An Open-Label Study to Enable Continued Treatment Access for Subjects Previously Enrolled in Studies of Ruxolitinib

    The purpose of this study is to provide continued supply of ruxolitinib alone, ruxolitinib plus background cancer therapy, or background cancer therapy alone to subjects from an Incyte-sponsored study of ruxolitinib that has reached its study objectives or has been terminated. This study will also provide another mechanism for reporting adverse events related to study drug safety.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • CMP-001 and INCAGN01949 for the Treatment of Patients with Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer and Other Cancers Except Melanoma

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of CMP-001 and how well it works when given together with INCAGN01949 in treating patients with stage IV pancreatic cancer and other cancers except melanoma. CMP-001 is made up of a short piece of DNA that is packaged in a protein, known as a virus-like particle (VLP). VLPs are detected and processed by cells of the immune system. The DNA contained in CMP-001 activates the immune system and recruit cells of the immune system to the tumor. INCAGN01949 is an antibody, a type of protein, which has been shown to stimulate the immune system. Injecting CMP-001 and INCAGN01949 directly into the tumor may work against tumor cells to slow tumor growth by causing tumor cells to die.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor M7824 and the Immunocytokine M9241 in Combination With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) in Adults With Advanced Pancreas Cancer

    Background: Fewer than 10 percent of people with pancreas cancer can have surgery. Surgery gives the best outcome. Radiation therapy is usually used to make surgery possible. But it does not work for most people. Adding immunotherapy might help. Objective: To find a safe combined dose of M7824, M9241, and radiation and to see if it causes pancreas cancer tumors to shrink. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older who have pancreas cancer and cannot have curative surgery Design: Participants will be screened under protocol 01-C-0129 with: Medical history Physical exam Heart, urine, and blood tests Scans. For this, participants will lie in a machine that takes pictures of the body. They may receive a contrast agent by vein. Possible tumor biopsy Participants will take the study drugs either alone or with radiation. They will get M7824 by vein every 2 weeks. They will get M9241 injected under the skin every 4 weeks. Participants who get radiation will get it 5 days in a row the first month. Participants will have visits every 2 weeks. They will repeat screening tests. If participants tumors shrink, they will have surgery. If their whole tumor is removed, they will stop treatment. They will otherwise continue treatment as long as they can tolerate it and it is helping them. Participants will have visits 1 week and 1 month after they stop treatment. Then they will be contacted by phone or email for life. If they stop treatment for a reason other than their disease getting worse, they will have scans every 12 weeks.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Gemcitabine, Nab-Paclitaxel, and Bosentan for the Treatment of Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of bosentan and how well it works when given together with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel for the treatment of pancreatic cancer that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Bosentan may block the hormone endothelin and prevent the growth and spread of pancreatic cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving bosentan with chemotherapy (gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel) may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Safety, Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Preliminary Efficacy Trial of BNT411

    This first-in-human (FIH) trial aims to establish a safe dose of BNT411 as a monotherapy and in combination with atezolizumab, carboplatin and etoposide. BNT411 is a TLR7 agonist which is expected to mount broad innate and adaptive immune reactions, especially in combination with cytotoxic therapies and immune checkpoint inhibitors.
    Location: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

  • Testing the Addition of a New Anti-cancer Drug, M3814, to Radiation Therapy for Localized Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of M3814 and to see how well it works when given together with radiation therapy in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that cannot be removed by surgery and has not spread to other parts of the body (localized). M3814 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivers higher doses of radiation therapy over a shorter period of time and may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects. Giving M3814 and hypofractionated radiation therapy together may work better than radiation therapy alone in the treatment of patients with localized pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Testing a New Anti-cancer Drug Combination, Entinostat and GSK525762C, for Advanced and Refractory Solid Tumors and Lymphomas

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of GSK525762C (molibresib besylate) and entinostat in treating patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have spread to other parts of the body (advanced) or are not responding to treatment (refractory). GSK525762C and entinostat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. This study may help doctors find out if giving the combination of GSK525762C and entinostat is better or worse than the usual approach for treating solid tumors or lymphomas.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.