Treatment Clinical Trials for Penile Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for penile cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-15 of 15
  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with Rare Tumors

    This phase II trial studies nivolumab and ipilimumab in treating patients with rare tumors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial enrolls participants for the following cohorts based on condition: 1. Epithelial tumors of nasal cavity, sinuses, nasopharynx: A) Squamous cell carcinoma with variants of nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx and trachea (excluding laryngeal, nasopharyngeal cancer [NPC], and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck [SCCHN]) B) Adenocarcinoma and variants of nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx (closed to accrual 07 / 27 / 2018) 2. Epithelial tumors of major salivary glands (closed to accrual 03 / 20 / 2018) 3. Salivary gland type tumors of head and neck, lip, esophagus, stomach, trachea and lung, breast and other location (closed to accrual) 4. Undifferentiated carcinoma of gastrointestinal (GI) tract 5. Adenocarcinoma with variants of small intestine (closed to accrual 05 / 10 / 2018) 6. Squamous cell carcinoma with variants of GI tract (stomach small intestine, colon, rectum, pancreas) (closed to accrual 10 / 17 / 2018) 7. Fibromixoma and low grade mucinous adenocarcinoma (pseudomixoma peritonei) of the appendix and ovary (closed to accrual 03 / 20 / 2018) 8. Rare pancreatic tumors including acinar cell carcinoma, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma or serous cystadenocarcinoma. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is not eligible 9. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (closed to accrual 03 / 20 / 2018) 10. Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and bile duct tumors (closed to accrual 03 / 20 / 2018) 11. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of lung 12. Bronchoalveolar carcinoma lung. This condition is now also referred to as adenocarcinoma in situ, minimally invasive adenocarcinoma, lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma, or invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma 13. Non-epithelial tumors of the ovary: A) Germ cell tumor of ovary B) Mullerian mixed tumor and adenosarcoma (closed to accrual 03 / 30 / 2018) 14. Trophoblastic tumor: A) Choriocarcinoma (closed to accrual) 15. Transitional cell carcinoma other than that of the renal, pelvis, ureter, or bladder (closed to accrual) 16. Cell tumor of the testes and extragonadal germ tumors: A) Seminoma and testicular sex cord cancer B) Non-seminomatous tumor C) Teratoma with malignant transformation (closed to accrual) 17. Epithelial tumors of penis - squamous adenocarcinoma cell carcinoma with variants of penis 18. Squamous cell carcinoma variants of the genitourinary (GU) system 19. Spindle cell carcinoma of kidney, pelvis, ureter 20. Adenocarcinoma with variants of GU system (excluding prostate cancer) (closed to accrual 07 / 27 / 2018) 21. Odontogenic malignant tumors 22. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) (formerly named: Endocrine carcinoma of pancreas and digestive tract.) (closed to accrual) 23. Neuroendocrine carcinoma including carcinoid of the lung (closed to accrual 12 / 19 / 2017) 24. Pheochromocytoma, malignant (closed to accrual) 25. Paraganglioma (closed to accrual 11 / 29 / 2018) 26. Carcinomas of pituitary gland, thyroid gland parathyroid gland and adrenal cortex (closed to accrual) 27. Desmoid tumors 28. Peripheral nerve sheath tumors and NF1-related tumors (closed to accrual 09 / 19 / 2018) 29. Malignant giant cell tumors 30. Chordoma (closed to accrual 11 / 29 / 2018) 31. Adrenal cortical tumors (closed to accrual 06 / 27 / 2018) 32. Tumor of unknown primary (Cancer of Unknown Primary; CuP) (closed to accrual 12 / 22 / 2017) 33. Not Otherwise Categorized (NOC) Rare Tumors [To obtain permission to enroll in the NOC cohort, contact: S1609SC@swog.org] (closed to accrual 03 / 15 / 2019) 34. Adenoid cystic carcinoma (closed to accrual 02 / 06 / 2018) 35. Vulvar cancer (temporarily closed to accrual) 36. MetaPLASTIC carcinoma (of the breast) (closed to accrual) 37. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) (closed to accrual 09 / 26 / 2018) 38. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) 39. Apocrine tumors / extramammary Paget’s disease (closed to accrual) 40. Peritoneal mesothelioma (temporarily closed to accrual 05 / 08 / 2020) 41. Basal cell carcinoma (temporarily closed to accrual 04 / 29 / 2020) 42. Clear cell cervical cancer 43. Esthenioneuroblastoma (closed to accrual) 44. Endometrial carcinosarcoma (malignant mixed Mullerian tumors) (closed to accrual) 45. Clear cell ovarian cancer (closed to accrual) 46. Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) 47. Gallbladder cancer 48. Small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic type 49. PD-L1 amplified tumors 50. Angiosarcoma 51. High-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor [PNET] should be enrolled in Cohort 22; prostatic neuroendocrine carcinomas should be enrolled into Cohort 52). Small cell lung cancer is not eligible (temporarily closed to accrual 03 / 25 / 2020) 52. Treatment-emergent small-cell neuroendocrine prostate cancer (t-SCNC)
    Location: 891 locations

  • Testing the Effectiveness of Two Immunotherapy Drugs (Nivolumab and Ipilimumab) with One Anti-cancer Targeted Drug (Cabozantinib) for Rare Genitourinary Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well cabozantinib works in combination with nivolumab and ipilimumab in treating patients with rare genitourinary (GU) tumors that have spread to other places in the body. Cabozantinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cabozantinib, nivolumab, and ipilimumab may work better in treating patients with genitourinary tumors that have no treatment options compared to giving cabozantinib, nivolumab, or ipilimumab alone.
    Location: 517 locations

  • A Study of XmAb®20717 in Subjects With Selected Advanced Solid Tumors

    This is a Phase 1, multiple dose, ascending dose escalation study to define a MTD / RD and regimen of XmAb20717, to describe safety and tolerability, to assess PK and immunogenicity, and to preliminarily assess anti-tumor activity of XmAb20717 in subjects with selected advanced solid tumors.
    Location: 15 locations

  • ILND Surgery Alone or after Chemotherapy with or without Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Advanced Penile Cancer

    This phase III randomized trial studies how well inguinal lymph node dissection (ILND) surgery alone or after chemotherapy with or without intensity-modulated radiation therapy works in treating patients with penile cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Surgery is used to remove the lymph nodes and may be able to cure the cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. It is not known whether having surgery after chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy is better than having surgery alone.
    Location: 13 locations

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with Advanced Rare Genitourinary Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab and ipilimumab work in treating patients with rare genitourinary tumors that have spread to other anatomic sites or is no longer responding to treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Cabozantinib S-malate and Nivolumab with or without Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic Genitourinary Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best doses of cabozantinib s-malate and nivolumab with or without ipilimumab in treating patients with genitourinary (genital and urinary organ) tumors that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Cabozantinib s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving cabozantinib s-malate and nivolumab alone or with ipilimumab works better in treating patients with genitourinary tumors.
    Location: 8 locations

  • M7824 in Subjects With HPV Associated Malignancies

    Background: In the United States, each year there are more than 30,000 cases of human papillomavirus (HPV) associated cancers. Some of these cancers are often incurable and are not improved by standard therapies. Researchers want to see if a new drug M7824, which targets and blocks a pathway that prevents the immune system from effectively fighting the cancer can shrink tumors in people with some HPV cancers. Objectives: To see if the drug M7824 causes tumors to shrink. Eligibility: Adults age 18 and older who have a cancer associated with HPV infection. Design: Participants will be screened with medical history and physical exam. They will review their symptoms and how they perform normal activities. They will have body scans. They will give blood and urine samples. They will have a sample of their tumor tissue taken if one is not available. Participants will have an electrocardiogram to evaluate their heart. Then they will get the study drug through a thin tube in an arm vein. Participants will get the drug every 2 weeks for 26 times (1 year). This is 1 course. After the course, participants will be monitored but will not take the study drug. If their condition gets worse, they will start another course with the drug. This process can be repeated as many times as needed. Treatment will stop if the participant has bad side effects or the drug stops working. Throughout the study, participants will repeat some or all the screening tests. After participants stop taking the drug, they will have a follow-up visit and repeat some screening tests. They will get periodic follow-up phone calls. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • DNA Plasmid-encoding Interleukin-12 / HPV DNA Plasmids Therapeutic Vaccine INO-3112 and Durvalumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Human Papillomavirus Associated Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) plasmid-encoding interleukin-12 / human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA plasmids therapeutic vaccine INO-3112 and durvalumab work in treating patients with human papillomavirus associated cancers that have come back or spread to other places in the body. Vaccines made from a gene-modified virus may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving DNA plasmid-encoding interleukin-12 / HPV DNA plasmids therapeutic vaccine INO-3112 and durvalumab may work better in treating patients with human papillomavirus associated cancers.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • PEN-866 in Patients With Advanced Solid Malignancies

    Protocol PEN-866-001 is an open-label, multi-center, first-in-human Phase 1 / 2a study evaluating PEN-866 in patients with advanced solid malignancies whose disease has progressed after treatment with previous anticancer therapies.
    Location: University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

  • Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Rare Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or are Metastatic

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab works in treating patients with rare tumors that cannot be removed by surgery or have spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may block specific proteins found on white blood cells which may strengthen the immune system and control tumor growth.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Rapid Analysis and Response Evaluation of Combination Anti-Neoplastic Agents in Rare Tumors (RARE CANCER) Trial: RARE 1 Nilotinib and Paclitaxel

    Background: People with rare cancers often have limited treatment options. The biology of rare cancers is not well understood. Researchers want to find better treatments for these cancers. They want to test 2 drugs that, taken separately, have helped people with non-rare cancers. They want to see if these drugs together can make rare cancers shrink or stop growing. Objective: To learn if nilotinib and paclitaxel will benefit people with rare cancers. Eligibility: People age 18 and older who have a rare, advanced cancer that has progressed after receiving standard treatment, or for which no effective therapy exists. Design: Participants will be screened with medical history and physical exam. They will have blood and urine tests. They will have a pregnancy test if needed. They will have an electrocardiogram to check their heart. They will have imaging scans to measure their tumors. Participants will repeat the screening tests during the study. Participants will receive nilotinib and paclitaxel. The drugs are given in 28-day cycles. Nilotinib is a capsule taken by mouth twice a day. Paclitaxel will be given intravenously by peripheral line or central line once a week for the first 3 weeks of each cycle. Participants will keep a medicine diary. They will track when they take the study drugs and any side effects they may have. Participants may have optional tumor biopsies. Participants can stay on the study until their disease gets worse or they have intolerable side effects. Participants will have a follow-up phone call about 30 days after taking the last dose of study drugs.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • HPV Vaccine PRGN-2009 Alone or in Combination With Anti-PDL1 / TGF-Beta Trap (M7824) in Subjects With HPV Associated Cancers

    Background: For some cancers associated with human papillomavirus (HPV), standard treatments are not helpful. Researchers want to see if a vaccine for HPV combined with a drug called M7824 has a better effect on these cancers than when they work alone. Objective: To find a safe dose of HPV vaccine alone or combined with M7824. Also, to test if either HPV vaccine alone or combined with M7824 causes a better immune response. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with locally advanced or metastatic HPV associated cancer (Phase I) or stage II or III p16-positive oropharyngeal cancer (Phase II) Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Blood, urine, and heart tests Possible photos of skin lesions CT, MRI, or nuclear bone scan: Participants will lie in a machine that takes pictures of the body. For the CT scan, they may have a contrast agent injected into a vein. Participants may have up to 2 tumor biopsies. For participants in Phase II, this may be performed with a thin tube placed through the nose into the airway. Participants will receive the HPV vaccine alone or with M7824. For participants on the Phase II, they will receive two doses of HPV vaccine under the skin either alone or with M7824 as an infusion spaced two weeks apart. This will be done prior to their planned chemoradiation or surgery. For participants on the Phase I, they will get the HPV vaccine injected under the skin 2 to 3 times in the first month. Then they will have a booster every 4 weeks. They will receive M7824 as an infusion into a vein every 2 weeks. Treatment will last up to 1 year. After they stop treatment, participants will have a visit within 4 weeks. They will then be contacted for long-term follow-up every year, for the rest of their lives. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Combination Immunotherapy in Subjects With Advanced HPV Associated Malignancies

    Background: More than 30,000 cases of human papillomavirus (HPV) associated cancers occur annually in the United States. When these cancers spread, they do not respond well to standard treatments and are often incurable. Researchers want to see if a mix of drugs can help. Objective: To learn if a mix of immunotherapy drugs can shrink tumors in people with HPV associated cancers. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with locally advanced or metastatic HPV associated cancer, such as cervical cancers; P16+ oropharyngeal cancers; anal cancers; vulvar, vaginal, penile, and squamous cell rectal cancers; or other locally advanced or metastatic solid tumors (e.g., lung, esophagus) that are known HPV+ cancers Design: Participants will be screened with: - medical history - disease confirmation (or tumor biopsy) - physical exam - body scans (CT, MRI, and / or nuclear) - blood tests - electrocardiogram (to measure the electrical activity of the heart) - urine tests. Participants will get PDS0101 injected under the skin every 4 weeks for 6 doses. Then they will get it every 3 months for 2 doses. Participants will get M7824 by intravenous infusion every 2 weeks. For this, a needle is inserted into a vein. The drug is given over a 1-hour period. Participants will get NHS-IL12 injected under the skin every 4 weeks. Participants will get the study drugs for up to 1 year. They will visit the NIH every 2 weeks. They will repeat the screening tests during the study. About 28 days after treatment ends, participants will have a follow-up visit or telephone call. Then they will be contacted every 3 months for 1 year, and then every 6 months after that, for the rest of their life....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Testing the Addition of an Anti-cancer Drug, BAY 1895344, to the Usual Chemotherapy Treatment (Cisplatin, or Cisplatin and Gemcitabine) for Advanced Solid Tumors with Emphasis on Urothelial Cancer

    This phase I trial investigates the best dose and side effects of BAY 1895344 when given together with chemotherapy in treating patients with solid tumors or urothelial cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). BAY 1895344 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin and gemcitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The purpose of this trial is to test the safety of a drug called BAY 1895344 in combination with the usual chemotherapy treatment (cisplatin, or cisplatin and gemcitabine) for the treatment of advanced solid tumors, including urothelial cancer.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Atezolizumab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients with Rare Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab and bevacizumab work in treating patients with rare solid tumors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab and bevacizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas