Pheochromocytoma Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for pheochromocytoma. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-17 of 17
  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with Rare Tumors

    This phase II trial studies nivolumab and ipilimumab in treating patients with rare tumors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial enrolls participants for the following cohorts based on condition: 1. Epithelial tumors of nasal cavity, sinuses, nasopharynx: A) Squamous cell carcinoma with variants of nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx and trachea (excluding laryngeal, nasopharyngeal cancer [NPC], and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck [SCCHN]) B) Adenocarcinoma and variants of nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx (closed to accrual 07 / 27 / 2018) 2. Epithelial tumors of major salivary glands (closed to accrual 03 / 20 / 2018) 3. Salivary gland type tumors of head and neck, lip, esophagus, stomach, trachea and lung, breast and other location (closed to accrual) 4. Undifferentiated carcinoma of gastrointestinal (GI) tract 5. Adenocarcinoma with variants of small intestine (closed to accrual 05 / 10 / 2018) 6. Squamous cell carcinoma with variants of GI tract (stomach small intestine, colon, rectum, pancreas) (closed to accrual 10 / 17 / 2018) 7. Fibromixoma and low grade mucinous adenocarcinoma (pseudomixoma peritonei) of the appendix and ovary (closed to accrual 03 / 20 / 2018) 8. Rare pancreatic tumors including acinar cell carcinoma, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma or serous cystadenocarcinoma. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is not eligible 9. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (closed to accrual 03 / 20 / 2018) 10. Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and bile duct tumors (closed to accrual 03 / 20 / 2018) 11. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of lung 12. Bronchoalveolar carcinoma lung. This condition is now also referred to as adenocarcinoma in situ, minimally invasive adenocarcinoma, lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma, or invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma 13. Non-epithelial tumors of the ovary: A) Germ cell tumor of ovary B) Mullerian mixed tumor and adenosarcoma (closed to accrual 03 / 30 / 2018) 14. Trophoblastic tumor: A) Choriocarcinoma (closed to accrual 04 / 15 / 2019) 15. Transitional cell carcinoma other than that of the renal, pelvis, ureter, or bladder (closed to accrual 04 / 15 / 2019) 16. Cell tumor of the testes and extragonadal germ tumors: A) Seminoma and testicular sex cord cancer B) Non-seminomatous tumor C) Teratoma with malignant transformation (closed to accrual 3 / 15 / 2019) 17. Epithelial tumors of penis - squamous adenocarcinoma cell carcinoma with variants of penis 18. Squamous cell carcinoma variants of the genitourinary (GU) system 19. Spindle cell carcinoma of kidney, pelvis, ureter 20. Adenocarcinoma with variants of GU system (excluding prostate cancer) (closed to accrual 07 / 27 / 2018) 21. Odontogenic malignant tumors 22. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) (formerly named: Endocrine carcinoma of pancreas and digestive tract.) 23. Neuroendocrine carcinoma including carcinoid of the lung (closed to accrual 12 / 19 / 2017) 24. Pheochromocytoma, malignant 25. Paraganglioma (closed to accrual 11 / 29 / 2018) 26. Carcinomas of pituitary gland, thyroid gland parathyroid gland and adrenal cortex 27. Desmoid tumors 28. Peripheral nerve sheath tumors and NF1-related tumors (closed to accrual 09 / 19 / 2018) 29. Malignant giant cell tumors 30. Chordoma (closed to accrual 11 / 29 / 2018) 31. Adrenal cortical tumors (closed to accrual 06 / 27 / 2018) 32. Tumor of unknown primary (Cancer of Unknown Primary; CuP) (closed to accrual 12 / 22 / 2017) 33. Not Otherwise Categorized (NOC) Rare Tumors [To obtain permission to enroll in the NOC cohort, contact: S1609SC@swog.org] (closed to accrual 03 / 15 / 2019) 34. Adenoid cystic carcinoma (closed to accrual 02 / 06 / 2018) 35. Vulvar cancer 36. MetaPLASTIC carcinoma (of the breast) 37. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) (closed to accrual 09 / 26 / 2018) 38. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) 39. Apocrine tumors / extramammary Paget’s disease 40. Peritoneal mesothelioma 41. Basal cell carcinoma 42. Clear cell cervical cancer 43. Esthenioneuroblastoma 44. Endometrial carcinosarcoma (malignant mixed Mullerian tumors) (closed to accrual) 45. Clear cell cervical endometrial cancer 46. Clear cell ovarian cancer 47. Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) 48. Gallbladder cancer 49. Small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic type 50. PD-L1 amplified tumors 51. Angiosarcoma 52. High-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor [PNET] should be enrolled in Cohort 22; prostatic neuroendocrine carcinomas should be enrolled into Cohort 53). Small cell lung cancer is not eligible 53. Treatment-emergent small-cell neuroendocrine prostate cancer (t-SCNC)
    Location: 857 locations

  • PEN-221 in Somatostatin Receptor 2 Expressing Advanced Cancers Including Neuroendocrine and Small Cell Lung Cancers

    Protocol PEN-221-001 is an open-label, multicenter Phase 1 / 2a study evaluating PEN-221 in patients with SSTR2 expressing advanced gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) or lung or thymus or other neuroendocrine tumors or small cell lung cancer or large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Cisplatin or Carboplatin and Etoposide With or Without Vandetanib in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer or High-Grade or Poorly Undifferentiated Neuroendocrine Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well cisplatin or carboplatin and etoposide with or without vandetanib works in treating patients with previously untreated extensive stage small cell lung cancer or high-grade or poorly differentiated neuroendocrine cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Vandetanib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether giving cisplatin or carboplatin and etoposide is more effective with or without vandetanib in treating small cell lung cancer or neuroendocrine cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Axitinib in Treating Patients with Metastatic, Recurrent, or Primary Unresectable Pheochromocytoma or Paraganglioma

    This phase II trial studies how well axitinib works in treating patients with pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma that has spread to other parts of the body, has come back, or cannot be removed by surgery. Axitinib may stop the growth or shrink tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: NYP / Columbia University Medical Center / Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Lu-177-DOTATATE (Lutathera) in Therapy of Inoperable Pheochromocytoma / Paraganglioma

    Background: Pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma are rare tumors. They usually form inside and near the adrenal gland or in the neck region. Not all these tumors can be removed with surgery, and there are no good treatments if the disease has spread. Researchers think a new drug may be able to help. Objective: To learn the safety and tolerability of Lu-177-DOTATATE. Also, to see if it improves the length of time it takes for the cancer to return. Eligibility: Adults who have an inoperable tumor of the study cancer that can be detected with Ga-68-DOTATATE PET / CT imaging Design: Participants will be screened with a medical history, physical exam, and blood tests. Eligible participants will be admitted to the NIH Clinical Center. Participants will get the study drug in an intravenous infusion. They will get 4 doses, given about 8 weeks apart. Between 4 and 24 hours after each study drug dose, participants will have scans taken. They will lie on their back on a scanner table. Participants will have vital signs taken. They will give blood and urine samples. During the study, participants will have other scans taken. Some scans will use a radioactive tracer. Participants will complete quality of life questionnaires. Participants will be contacted by phone 1-3 days after they leave the Clinical Center. They will then be followed every 3 to 6 months for 3 years or until their disease gets worse.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Guadecitabine in Treating Patients with Wild-Type Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor, Pheochromocytoma, Paraganglioma, or Kidney Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well guadecitabine works in treating patients with wild-type gastrointestinal stromal tumor, pheochromocytoma, paraganglioma, or kidney cancer. Guadecitabine may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Iobenguane I-131 and Yttrium Y 90-Edotreotide in Treating Patients with Midgut Neuroendocrine Tumors, Pheochromocytoma, or Paraganglioma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of iobenguane iodine (I)-131 and yttrium Y 90-edotreotide in treating patients with midgut neuroendocrine tumors, pheochromocytoma, or paraganglioma. Radioactive drugs, such as iobenguane I-131 and yttrium Y 90-edotreotide, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Akt / ERK Inhibitor ONC201 in Treating Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumors That Are Locally Advanced, Metastatic, Recurrent, Refractory, or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well akt / ERK inhibitor ONC201 works in treating patients with neuroendocrine tumors that have spread to other places in the body, have come back, do not respond to treatment, or cannot be removed by surgery. Akt / ERK inhibitor ONC201 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Lenvatinib in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Advanced Pheochromocytoma or Paraganglioma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well lenvatinib works in treating patients with pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma that has spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Lenvatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Rare Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or are Metastatic

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab works in treating patients with rare tumors that cannot be removed by surgery or have spread to other parts of the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may block specific proteins found on white blood cells which may strengthen the immune system and control tumor growth.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Study to Evaluate the Safety and Preliminary Efficacy of 177Lu-OPSC001 in NETs

    The purpose of this clinical phase I / II study is to investigate the safety and tolerability of 177Lu-OPS201 used for the treatment of patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Secondary objectives of these study are the assessment of biodistribution, dosimetry and preliminary efficacy of 177Lu-OPS201.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Iobenguane I-131 in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Neuroblastoma or Non-neuroblastic Iobenguane Avid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well iobenguane I-131 works in treating patients with neuroblastoma or non-neuroblastic iobenguane avid tumors that has come back after a period of improvement or that does not respond to treatment. Iobenguane I-131 may help deliver radiation to the tumor cells and cause them to die.
    Location: Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio

  • Cabozantinib S-malate in Treating Patients with Metastatic Pheochromocytomas or Paragangliomas That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well cabozantinib s-malate works in treating patients with pheochromocytomas or paragangliomas that have spread from the primary site to other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Cabozantinib s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth and by blocking the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Iobenguane I-131 in Treating Patients with Recurrent Neuroblastoma, Malignant Pheochromocytoma, or Malignant Paraganglioma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of targeted radiation therapy with iobenguane I-131 and to see how well it works in treating patients with neuroblastoma that has come back or has not responded to treatment, or pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma that has spread to other places in the body. Radioactive drugs, such as iobenguane I-131, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Fluorine F-18 6-Fluorodopamine PET in Diagnosing Patients with Neuroblastoma or Pheochromocytoma

    This early phase I trial studies the side effects of fluorine F 18 (18F)-fluorodopamine positron emission tomography (PET) in diagnosing patients with neuroblastoma or pheochromocytoma. Diagnostic procedures, such as 18F-fluorodopamine PET, may help find and diagnose neuroblastoma or pheochromocytoma.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • 18F-MFBG PET / CT or PET / MR in Imaging Patients with Neuroendocrine Malignancies

    This pilot phase I / IIa trial studies meta-fluorine F18 fluorobenzylguanidine (18F-MFBG) positron emission tomography (PET) / computed tomography (CT) or PET / magnetic resonance (MR) in imaging patients with neuroendocrine malignancies. 18F-fluorine gives off radiation and is attached to MFBG, which allows the tumor to be detected by a PET / CT or PET / MR scanner. Researchers want to know how 18F-MFBG behaves in the body after injection, how it spreads and is removed from the body, and how long it stays in the blood. It may also help researchers determine whether 18F-MFBG PET / CT or PET / MR can be used to detect disease and perform scans faster and earlier compared to other routine imaging.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Clinical Manifestations and Molecular Bases of Heritable Urologic Malignant Disorders

    We will investigate the clinical manifestations and molecular genetic defects of heritable urologic malignant disorders. Families with urologic malignancy with known or suspected genetic basis will be enrolled. Affected individuals or individuals suspected of having a germline urologic malignant disorder will undergo periodic clinical assessment and genetic analyses for the purpose of: 1) definition and characterization of phenotype, 2) determination of the natural history of the disorder, and 3) genotype / phenotype correlation. Genetic linkage studies may be performed in situations in which the genetic basis of the disorder has not been elucidated.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland