Treatment Clinical Trials for Prostate Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for prostate cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 251-275 of 318

  • A Trial of CTT1403 for Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    The purpose of this study is to find the highest dose level of study drug, CTT1403, that can be safely administered to patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • Surgery and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Recurrent Prostate Cancer that Has Spread to Other Parts of the Body

    This phase II trial studies how well surgery and radiation therapy work in treating patients with prostate cancer that has come back (recurrent) or spread to other parts of the body. Radiation therapy uses high energy beams to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Surgical procedures, such as oligometastasectomy, may remove tumor cells that have spread to other parts of the body. Surgery and radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer that has come back or spread to other parts of the body.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Curcumin in Preventing Progression in Low-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Active Surveillance

    This phase III trial studies how well curcumin works in preventing progression in patients with prostate cancer that is limited to the prostate and who are undergoing active surveillance. This study is being done to determine if curcumin decreases the likelihood of cancer progressing in men undergoing active surveillance for prostate cancer.
    Location: UT Southwestern / Simmons Cancer Center-Dallas, Dallas, Texas

  • Transdermal Testosterone and Enzalutamide in Treating Patents with Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer Receiving Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    This early phase I trial studies how well testosterone works when delivered through the skin and is used alternately with enzalutamide in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer who are receiving androgen deprivation therapy. Hormone therapy using testosterone may help to maintain the amount of testosterone in the body, and enzalutamide may help to reduce the prostate specific antigen level. Giving transdermal testosterone alternately with enzalutamide may work better in treating patients with castration resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado

  • Antiandrogen Therapy, Abiraterone Acetate, and Prednisone with or without Neutron Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well antiandrogen therapy, abiraterone acetate, and prednisone with or without neutron radiation therapy work in treating patients with prostate cancer. Hormone therapy such as antiandrogen therapy may fight prostate cancer by blocking the production and interfering with the action of hormones. Abiraterone acetate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Neutron radiation therapy uses high energy neutrons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. It is not yet known whether antiandrogen therapy, abiraterone acetate, and prednisone with or without neutron radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • This Study is to Evaluate OBI-3424 Safe and Effective Treatment Dose in Subjects With Hepatocellular Carcinoma or Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    A first-in-human open-label, Phase I / II study to evaluate the safety, tolerability, MTD / RP2D, PK, and preliminary efficacy of OBI-3424 administered as a single agent in patients with solid tumors, hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).
    Location: 2 locations

  • Evaluation of Safety and Efficacy of KPG-121 Plus Enzalutamide, Abiraterone or Apalutamide in CRPC Patients

    This is a Phase 1, open-label, multicenter study of KPG-121 administered orally once daily (QD) in 28-day treatment cycles (21 days on and 7 days off) to adult subjects. The primary objective is to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) and assess dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of KPG-121 in combination with Enzalutamide or Abiraterone or Apalutamide when administered orally to adult subjects with non-metastatic or metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).
    Location: University of Virginia Cancer Center, Charlottesville, Virginia

  • African American Families Fighting Parental Cancer Together

    The purpose of this study is to test the usefulness of a family-based program for African American parents / primary caregivers with newly diagnosed solid tumor cancer and their adolescent children. The program is designed to promote family communication reduce and depressive symptoms for adolescence.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Nivolumab with Radiation Therapy and Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Treating Patients with Gleason Group 5 Prostate Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and side effects of nivolumab in combination with radiation therapy and androgen deprivation therapy in treating patients with Gleason group 5 prostate cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Brachytherapy, also known as internal radiation therapy, uses radioactive material placed directly into or near a tumor to kill tumor cells. External beam radiation therapy uses high energy beams to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving nivolumab and radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Rucaparib in Treating Patients with Non-metastatic, Hormone-Sensitive Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well rucaparib works in treating patients with prostate cancer that responds to hormone treatment has a specific genetic mutation, and which has not spread to other places in the body (non-metastatic). Rucaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Flutamide in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer on Androgen Suppression Undergoing Brachytherapy

    This phase II trial studies how well flutamide works in treating patients with prostate cancer on androgen suppression undergoing brachytherapy. Flutamide blocks the effects of testosterone and slows the growth and spread of tumor cells. Giving flutamide before brachytherapy may work better in patients with prostate cancer on androgen suppression.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Phase I / II Study of Immunotherapy Combination BN-Brachyury Vaccine, M7824, ALT-803 and Epacadostat (QuEST1)

    Background: Immunotherapy drugs help the body to fight cancer. Scientists think that combining some of these drugs will make them work better than when used alone. This may be true for many types of cancer, including castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Objective: To test if the combination of the drugs BN-brachyury, M7824, ALT-803, and Epacadostat is safe and shrinks tumors. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with CRPC or another metastatic cancer Design: Participants will be screened with: - Medical history - Physical exam - CT or MRI scans - Possible bone imaging - Blood, urine, and heart tests - Possible tumor biopsy Participants will be treated with a 2-, 3- or 4-drug combinations of the following study drugs in 2-week cycles: - Participants will receive M7824 by IV once every 2 weeks. - Participants will receive ALT-803 by injection once every 2 weeks. They will record any skin changes at the injection site in a diary. - Participants will receive BN-brachyury as 4 injections to different limbs. They will get the first 3 doses 2 weeks apart. Then they will get doses every 4 weeks for 6 months, then every 3 months for 2 years, then every 6 months. - Participants will take Epacadostat orally every 12 hours. They will keep a pill diary. Participants will have physical exams and blood and urine tests at the start of each cycle. They may have scans every 12 weeks. Participants will continue treatment until their disease gets worse or they cannot tolerate the side effects. Participants will have a follow-up visit 4-5 weeks after they stop treatment. They will have a physical exam and blood tests. They may be asked to return for scans every 3 months. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • High Dose Rate Brachytherapy in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies how well high dose rate brachytherapy works in treating patients with prostate cancer. Brachytherapy, also known as internal radiation therapy, uses radioactive material placed directly into or near a tumor to kill tumor cells. High dose rate radiation therapy delivers higher doses of radiation therapy over a shorter period of time and may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Exercise Intervention with or without Internet-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy in Reducing Fatigue in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    This randomized pilot phase II trial studies how well exercise intervention with or without internet-based cognitive behavior therapy works in reducing fatigue in patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced) and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Exercise intervention and internet-based cognitive behavior therapy may help to improve feelings of tiredness in patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Rucaparib Camsylate in Treating Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well rucaparib camsylate works in treating participants with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Rucaparib camsylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Radium Ra 223 Dichloride, Hormone Therapy and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This phase 2 trial studies radium Ra 223 dichloride, hormone therapy and stereotactic body radiation in treating patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Radium Ra 223 dichloride contains a radioactive substance that collects in the bone and gives off radiation that may kill cancer cells. Testosterone can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Leuprolide acetate or goserelin acetate lowers the amount of testosterone made by the body. This may help stop the growth of tumor cells that need testosterone to grow. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving radium Ra 223 dichloride, hormone therapy and stereotactic body radiation may work better at treating prostate cancer.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Degarelix, Bicalutamide, and Docetaxel before Surgery in Treating Patients with High Risk Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This pilot early phase I trial studies how well degarelix, bicalutamide, and docetaxel before surgery works in treating patients with high risk prostate. Hormone therapy using degarelix and bicalutamide, may fight prostate cancer by lowering the amount of testosterone the body makes. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving degarelix, bicalutamide, and docetaxel before surgery may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Combination Immunotherapy in Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    Background: Some people with prostate cancer have a rise in prostate-specific antigen (PSA). This can happen even after treatments like radiation and surgery. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) drugs and close monitoring are one standard way to treat this group of people. Another way is to monitor people and their PSA values over time. Researchers want to see if a combination of new drugs can help these people. Objective: To see if the combination treatment of PROSTVAC, CV301, and MSB0011359C (M7824) can induce an anti-tumor attack in people with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with certain kinds of prostate cancer Design: Participants will be screened with - Medical history - Physical exam - Blood and urine tests - A scan of the neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis - A bone scan A sample of tissue that was already taken will be tested. This will confirm the diagnosis, stage, and disease status. Some participants will have close monitoring with four monthly PSA checks. All participants will get two study drugs as shots under the skin. They will get the third drug in a vein. They will get the drugs over at least 7 months. Their vital signs will be checked before they get the drugs and for up to 1 hour after. Participants will have frequent study visits. They will have physical exams, urine and blood tests, and scans. Participants will return to the clinic about 4 weeks after they stop taking the study drugs. They will have a medical history, physical exam, and blood tests. They may also have long-term follow-up visits.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Radium Ra 223 Dichloride and External Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer Metastatic in the Bone

    This phase II trial studies how well radium Ra 223 dichloride and external beam radiation therapy work in treating patients with prostate cancer that has spread to the bone. Radioactive drugs, such as radium Ra 223 dichloride, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Radiation therapy uses high energy beams to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving radium Ra 223 dichloride and external beam radiation therapy together may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • IONIS-AR-2.5Rx and Enzalutamide in Treating Patients with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of IONIS-AR-2.5Rx when given together with enzalutamide and to see how well they work in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as IONIS-AR-2.5Rx and enzalutamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Prostate SBRT for Locally Recurrent Prostate Cancer After Prior Radiotherapy

    Background: Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in U.S. men. Radiation is an effective treatment for most patients with localized prostate cancer, but sometimes the tumor returns. Researchers want to see if a highly focused type of radiation can help. It is given in only 5 treatments. It is called stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Objective: To study the maximum tolerated dose and side effects of stereotactic body radiation therapy in people with a local recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation. Eligibility: Men at least 18 years old who have recurrent prostate cancer after radiation therapy and no evidence of distant metastatic disease Design: Participants will be screened with blood tests, physical exam, and medical history. They may also have: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the prostate.. PET / CT scan. Participants will get an injection of 18F-DCFPyL for the PET scan. They will lie very still on their back on the scanner table. Small samples of prostate tumor tissue will be taken by a needle through the skin or rectum to see if the cancer is in the prostate. Small metal seeds will be placed into the prostate at the same time to help guide the radiation. About 2 weeks later, participants will have a radiation treatment planning CT scan. Participants will answer questions about their urine function, bowel function, erectile function, and mood. Participants will receive SBRT. They will have 5 radiation treatments over 2 weeks. Participants will have follow-up visits. They will have a physical exam, blood tests, and questionnaires. Six months after ending SBRT, the 18F-DCFPyL PET / CT will be repeated. Participantes will continue to have routine visits until two years after treatment is completed....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Enzalutamide and Niclosamide in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of niclosamide when given together with enzalutamide in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer that has come back (recurrent) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Androgens can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Hormone therapy using enzalutamide may fight prostate cancer by lowering the amount of androgen the body makes and / or blocking the use of androgen by the tumor cells. Niclosamide may block signals that enhance prostate cancer cell growth. Giving enzalutamide and niclosamide may work better in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • A Study Evaluating MM-310 in Patients With Solid Tumors

    MM-310 is a liposomal formulation of a docetaxel prodrug that targets the EphA2 receptor on cancer cells. Docetaxel is an approved chemotherapeutic drug.This study is a Phase 1 open-label study of MM-310 in patients with solid tumors. In the first part of the study, MM-310 will be assessed as a monotherapy until a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is established. After an MTD of MM-310 as a monotherapy is established, an expansion cohort and MM-310 in combination with other therapies will be assessed.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Standard Chemotherapy and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant after Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This pilot phase I clinical trial studies how well donor bone marrow transplant works when given together with standard chemotherapy in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving standard chemotherapy and donor bone marrow transplant may work better in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Apalutamide with or without Abiraterone Acetate, Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Analog, and Prednisone in Treating Patients with High-Risk Prostate Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well apalutamide works with or without abiraterone acetate, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, and prednisone in treating patients with high-risk prostate cancer undergoing surgery. Androgen can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Hormone therapy using apalutamide, abiraterone acetate, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRH agonist) may fight prostate cancer by lowering the levels of androgen the body makes. Prednisone may either kill the tumor cells or stop them from dividing. Giving apalutamide with or without abiraterone acetate, GnRH agonist and prednisone may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey