Treatment Clinical Trials for Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for non-melanoma skin cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 176-195 of 195
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  • Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Rare Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or are Metastatic

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab works in treating patients with rare tumors that cannot be removed by surgery or have spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may block specific proteins found on white blood cells which may strengthen the immune system and control tumor growth.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in Treating Patients with Malignancies with BK and / or JC Virus

    This phase II trial studies how well donor cytotoxic T lymphocytes work in treating patients with malignancies with BK and / or JC virus. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes are made from donated blood cells that are grown in the laboratory and are designed to kill viruses that can cause infections in transplant patients and may be an effective treatment in patients with malignancies with BK and / or JC virus.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • RTX-321 Monotherapy in Patients With HPV 16+ Tumors

    This is an open-label, multicenter, multiple-ascending dose, FIH, Phase 1 study of RTX-321 for the treatment of patients that are HLA-A*02:01 positive with persistent, recurrent, or metastatic, unresectable, HPV 16+ cancers.
    Location: University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado

  • Domatinostat in Combination With Avelumab in Patients With Advanced Merkel Cell Carcinoma Progressing on Anti-PD-(L)1

    This phase II trial studies how well domatinostat (4SC-202) works in combination with avelumab in adult patients with advanced unresectable and / or metastatic Merkel Cell Carcinoma that have progressed on a previous therapy with an anti-PD-(L)1 antibody
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Combination Therapy With NC-6004 and Pembrolizumab in Head and Neck Cancer Subjects Who Have Failed Platinum Regimen

    In Phase IIa, dose-escalation study to determine the optimum tolerated dose and a recommended Phase IIb (RPIIb) dose in combination with pembrolizumab in subjects with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who have failed platinum or a platinum containing regimen. In Phase IIb, randomized control study between NC-6004 in combination with pembrolizumab versus pembrolizumab alone in the same subject population as Part 1 at the RPIIb dose identified in PIIa.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • First-in-Human Study of ICT01 in Patients With Advanced Cancer

    Part 1 will be a dose escalation study of IV ICT01 (a monoclonal antibody targeting BTN3A) as monotherapy in patients with advanced solid or hematologic tumors, followed by a cohort examining the combination of ICT01 plus pembrolizumab (Keytruda). Part 2 will be a cohort expansion into 2-3 solid tumor indications and one hematologic malignancy for ICT01 monotherapy, and 1-2 solid tumor indication receiving ICT01 plus pembrolizumab.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • BDB001-201: A Clinical Study of BDB001 in Patients With PD-(L)1 Refractory Solid Tumors

    BDB001-201 is a multi-center, open-label, Phase II clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of BDB001 in the treatment of subjects with advanced solid tumors that have progressed on anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 mAb treatment.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Immunotherapy Combination: Irradiated PD-L1 CAR-NK Cells Plus Pembrolizumab Plus N-803 for Subjects With Recurrent / Metastatic Gastric or Head and Neck Cancer

    Background: Immunotherapy is a powerful tool in the fight against cancer. It uses the body s own immune system to fight the cancer. Unfortunately, cancer cells can find ways to escape from destruction by the body s immune system, even when immunotherapy is used. Natural killer (NK) cells are an important part of the body s immune system and can help fight cancer. In combination with immunotherapy, researchers are using engineered NK cells that recognize and kill cancer cells trying to escape destruction by the immune system. Objective: To test the effectiveness of irradiated PD-L1 CAR-NK cells, combined with pembrolizumab and N-803, in people with advanced forms of gastric or head and neck cancer. Eligibility: Adults ages 18 and older with advanced gastric or head and neck cancer who have already had standard cancer treatment. Design: Participants will be screened with a medical history and physical exam. Their symptoms and ability to do normal activities will be assessed. They will have blood and urine tests. They will have imaging scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. Participants will get PD-L1 CAR-NK cells by intravenous (IV) infusion. They will get the cells once a week for 6 weeks. Then they will get the cells once every 2 weeks. Before each infusion, an IV catheter will be placed in a large arm vein for infusion of these treatments. Participants will get pembrolizumab by IV every 6 weeks. They will get N-803 under the skin every 4 weeks. Participants will get the study drugs for up to 2 years. They will have study visits every 1-2 weeks during treatment. They will have a safety visit 28 days after treatment ends. After treatment ends, participants will be contacted for follow-up every 2 months for a year. Then they will be contacted every 6 months. They will have tumor scans every 6-12 weeks until their cancer gets worse.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • X-ray Psoralen Activated Cancer Therapy in Head and Neck, Breast, Sarcoma and Melanoma

    In this Phase I trial for subjects with advanced head & neck cancer, breast cancer, soft tissue sarcoma or melanoma all subjects will receive open label X-PACT treatment as a intra-tumoral injection. The primary objective will be to establish the safety of X-PACT when dosed with 5 intra-tumoral injections of the combination product (the phosphor device and methoxsalen sterile solution and subsequently exposing the tumor to X-ray energy) over a period of 6 weeks (on day D1, D3 and D5 of Week 1, on D1 of Week 2, and a booster on D1 of Week 6). After the week 8 tumor assessment subjects demonstrating stable disease, partial response or unconfirmed progression assessed by iRecist, will be eligible to receive two additional booster treatments 4-6 weeks apart. Treatment will be considered safe provided ≤ 2 out of 12 patients experience a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) during the 6 weeks after the first intra-tumoral injection.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • Safety and Efficacy of XmAb18087 ± Pembrolizumab in Advanced Merkel Cell Carcinoma or Extensive-stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This is a Phase 1b / 2, multiple-dose study designed to describe safety and efficacy, and to assess PK and immunogenicity of XmAb18087 monotherapy and in combination with pembrolizumab in subjects with metastatic Merkel cell (MCC) or locoregional MCC that has recurred after locoregional therapy with surgery and / or radiation therapy, and XmAb18087 monotherapy in subjects with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC) that has progressed after standard therapies.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Cemiplimab before and after Surgery for the Treatment of High Risk Cutaneous Squamous Cell Cancer

    This phase I trial studies how well cemiplimab before and after surgery works in treating patients with high risk cutaneous squamous cell cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as cemiplimab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cemiplimab before surgery may improve risk of the cancer returning in patients with high risk cutaneous squamous cell cancer.
    Location: Emory University Hospital / Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia

  • Personalized Vaccine (PANDA-VAC) and Pembrolizumab for the Treatment of Squamous Cell Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of a personalized vaccine (PANDA-VAC) when giving together with pembrolizumab in treating patients with squamous cell non-small cell lung cancer or squamous cell head and neck cancer. Abnormal cells, such as cancer cells, have special substances on their surface (called neoantigens) that are not found in normal cells. The personalized vaccine is a mix of neoantigens that are specific to the person's cancer. Vaccines work to boost the immune response in fighting abnormal cells. Immune cells can recognize these neoantigen substances and destroy the abnormal cells that carry them. After this, the immune system has a “memory” that helps it respond to those substances in the future. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving PANDA-VAC in combination with pembrolizumab may help strengthen the way the immune system responds to squamous cell non-small cell lung cancer and squamous cell head and neck cancer.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • Rigosertib for the Treatment of Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Associated Unresectable, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Squamous Cell Skin Cancer

    This early phase I trial studies the side effects and how well rigosertib works in treating patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and squamous cell skin cancer that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable), has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced), or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Rigosertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Arsenic Trioxide and Itraconazole in Treating Patients with Advanced Basal Cell Cancer

    This phase I trial studies how well arsenic trioxide and itraconazole work in treating patients with basal cell cancer that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as arsenic trioxide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Itraconazole may help treat fungal infections in patients with basal cell cancer. Giving arsenic trioxide with itraconazole may work better in treating basal cell cancer.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Olaparib with Pembrolizumab and Carboplatin as First-Line Treatment of Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    This phase II trial investigates the effect of olaparib with pembrolizumab and carboplatin in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that has come back after improvement (recurrent) or has spread to other places of the body (metastatic). Olaparib is an inhibitor of PARP, an enzyme that helps repair deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) when it becomes damaged. Blocking PARP may help keep tumor cells from repairing their damaged DNA, causing them to die. PARP inhibitors are a type of targeted therapy. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Olaparib, pembrolizumab, and carboplatin may work together to improve response to treatment beyond what is seen when pembrolizumab is given by itself.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • A Study of Duvelisib in Combination With Pembrolizumab in Head and Neck Cancer

    This study will assess the safety and preliminary efficacy of duvelisib in combination with pembrolizumab in subjects with recurrent or metastatic (R / M) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).
    Location: 3 locations

  • Anti-PD-L1 / TGF-beta Trap (M7824) Alone and in Combination With TriAd Vaccine and N-803 for Resectable Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Not Associated With Human Papillomavirus Infection

    Background: Some people who get head and neck cancer will need surgery to treat their cancer. Research suggests that immunotherapy drugs may help fight head and neck cancer if given before surgery. In most cases, there is enough time between cancer diagnosis and surgery to test immunotherapy drugs. In this study, researchers are testing the safety and anti-cancer abilities of 3 drugs given before surgery for head and neck cancer. Objective: To learn if giving M7824 alone, or with the TriAd vaccine, or with TriAd vaccine plus N-803 can shrink previously untreated head and neck tumors before surgery or stop the tumors from coming back after all treatment. Eligibility: People age 18 and older who have a head and neck cancer that has not been treated before, and the tumor must be removed with surgery. Design: Participants will be screened in a separate protocol. Participants will have the following tests: - medical history and physical exams - computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scans - tumor, mucosa, and skin biopsies - electrocardiograms to monitor heart activity - endoscopies (a tube is inserted through the nose to see the upper airway) - blood and urine tests. All participants will get M7824 through an intravenous infusion. For this, a small plastic tube is put into an arm vein. Some may also get the TriAd vaccine. It is injected under the skin on the arms or legs. Some may also get N-803. It is injected under the skin on the stomach. Participants will have clinic visits while they are getting treatment and after treatment ends. After treatment ends, participants will have their scheduled surgery. There will be two follow up visits at the NIH after your surgery. They will be contacted by phone or email every 2 weeks for 3 months. Then they will be contacted every 3 months for 2 years. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • CLR 131 and External Beam Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Patients with Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of CLR 131 when given together with external beam radiation therapy and to see how well they work in treating patients with head and neck cancer that has come back (recurrent). Radioactive drugs, such as CLR 131, may carry radiation directly to cancer cells and not harm normal cells. External beam radiation therapy uses high energy protons to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Giving CLR 131 with the external beam radiation therapy as a treatment may reduce the amount of external radiation needed to treat the tumor, thus reducing long-term injury to surrounding tissue.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Tacrolimus, Nivolumab, and Ipilimumab in Treating Kidney Transplant Recipients with Selected Unresectable or Metastatic Cancers

    This phase I trial studies how well tacrolimus, nivolumab, and ipilimumab work in treating kidney transplant recipients with cancer that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Tacrolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving tacrolimus, nivolumab, and ipilimumab may work better in treating kidney transplant recipients with cancer compared to chemotherapy, surgery, radiation therapy, or targeted therapies.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Atezolizumab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients with Rare Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab and bevacizumab work in treating patients with rare solid tumors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab and bevacizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas


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