Treatment Clinical Trials for Small Cell Lung Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for small cell lung cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 76-96 of 96

  • A Study Evaluating MM-310 in Patients With Solid Tumors

    MM-310 is a liposomal formulation of a docetaxel prodrug that targets the EphA2 receptor on cancer cells. Docetaxel is an approved chemotherapeutic drug.This study is a Phase 1 open-label study of MM-310 in patients with solid tumors. In the first part of the study, MM-310 will be assessed as a monotherapy until a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is established. After an MTD of MM-310 as a monotherapy is established, an expansion cohort and MM-310 in combination with other therapies will be assessed.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Continuous 24h Intravenous Infusion of Mithramycin, an Inhibitor of Cancer Stem Cell Signaling, in People With Primary Thoracic Malignancies or Carcinomas, Sarcomas or Germ Cell Neoplasms With Pleuropulmonary Metastases

    Background: Mithramycin is a new cancer drug. In another study, people with chest cancer took the drug 6 hours a day for 7 straight days. Many of them had liver damage as a side effect. It was discovered that only people with certain genes got this side effect. Researchers want to test mithramycin in people who do not have those certain genes. Objectives: To find the highest safe dose of mithramycin that can be given to people with chest cancer who have certain genes over 24 hours instead of spread out over a longer period of time. To see if mithramycin given as a 24-hour infusion shrinks tumors. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older who have chest cancer that is not shrinking with known therapies, and whose genes will limit the chance of liver damage from mithramycin Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Blood and urine tests Lung and heart function tests X-rays or scans of their tumor Liver ultrasound Tumor biopsy Participants will be admitted to the hospital overnight. A small plastic tube (catheter) will be inserted in the arm or chest. They will get mithramycin through the catheter over about 24 hours. If they do not have bad side effects or their cancer does not worsen, they can repeat the treatment every 14 days. Participants will have multiple visits for each treatment cycle. These include repeats of certain screening tests. After stopping treatment, participants will have weekly visits until they recover from any side effects.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Trial of CRLX101, a Nanoparticle Camptothecin With Olaparib in People With Relapsed / Refractory Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Background: CRLX101 consists of a sugar molecule cyclodextrin linked to a chemotherapy drug called camptothecin. The combined molecule or nanoparticle drug conjugate travels through the blood. Once inside cancer cells, the chemotherapy drug is released from the molecule. Olaparib is a drug that may stop cancer cells from repairing the DNA damage caused by chemotherapy. Researchers want to see how safe it is to give CRLX101 and olaparib together and to see how well the combination treats a specific type of lung cancer called small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Objectives: To test the safety and maximum dose of CLRX101 and olaparib together. To test how well they treat small cell lung cancer. Eligibility: Adults 18 and older with small cell lung cancer. Design: Participants will be screened with standard cancer care tests. Participants will get the 2 study drugs in 28-day cycles. CRLX101 will be given every 2 weeks, through a small plastic tube in an arm vein. Olaparib will be taken by mouth twice a day most days. Participants will keep a pill diary. For Cycle 1, participants will have 3 visits. All other cycles will have 2 visits. At study visits, participants may have: Blood and hair samples taken History and Physical exam Questions about health and side effects Pregnancy test Optional tumor biopsy where a piece of tumor is removed by needle after numbing the skin. . CT scan Injection of CRLX101 (twice per cycle) Olaparib prescription Participants will have a follow-up visit 4 weeks after finish taking the drugs. They will have a physical exam and blood tests. They may have a tumor biopsy. The study team will call the patient every 3 months for follow up after completing the study treatment. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Nab-Paclitaxel and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Progressive Small Cell Cancer after First-Line Therapy

    This phase II trial studies how well nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine hydrochloride work in treating patients with small cell cancer that has come back or is growing, spreading, or getting worse after first-line therapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Trial of Topotecan With VX-970 (M6620), an ATR Kinase Inhibitor, in Small Cell Cancers and Extrapulmonary Small Cell Cancers

    Background: Chemotherapy damages cancer cell DNA so the cells die and the tumor shrinks. But it may stop working in some people over time. This is partly due to efficient DNA damage repair mechanisms used by tumor cells. VX-970 (M6620) may stop cancer cells from preventing the repair of DNA damaged by chemotherapy. The purpose of this study is to see if using the chemotherapy drug topotecan along with the drug VX-970 (M6620) will improve the response to chemotherapy. Objective: To study the safety and efficacy of VX-970 (M6620) and topotecan in treating small cell lung cancer. Eligibility: Adults at least 18 years old with small cell lung cancer . Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, blood and heart tests, and scans. Most of these tests are part of their routine care. Most of these tests will be repeated throughout the study. The study is set in 21-day cycles. Participants will get topotecan IV on days 1 through 5. They will get VX-970 (M6620) IV on day 5 alone or on day 5 and day 2. Participants doctors will monitor them weekly for the first cycle, every 3 weeks after that. For Part 1 of this Study the doses of topotecan and VX-970 (M6620) will be increased (according to the Protocol) to determine the maximum safe dose of the combination. The maximum safe dose of the combination is the dose at which no more than 1 in 6 people have an intolerable side effect. More participants will join in Phase 2. They will take the drugs at the maximum safe dose, on the same schedule as the drugs were taken in Phase 1. Participants will give samples of blood, hair, and tumor tissue (optional) at different times. They will discuss side effects at every visit. A month after stopping taking the drugs, participants will have a physical exam and blood drawn. They will have follow-up phone calls every 3 months.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Olaparib (LYNPARZA) Plus Durvalumab (IMFINZI) in EGFR-Mutated Adenocarcinomas That Transform to Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) and Other Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Background: Lung cancers with EGFR mutations may develop resistance to therapies targeting this protein by evolving / being transformed into small cell or neuroendocrine cancers. There are no standard treatments for it. Researchers want to see if a new combination of drugs can help. Objective: To see if the combination of durvalumab and olaparib will cause tumors to shrink. Eligibility: Adults age 18 and older who had EGFR-mutated non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) that was treated and now transformed to SCLC or another neuroendocrine tumor. Design: Participants will be screened under a separate protocol. They may have a tumor biopsy. Participants will have a physical exam. They will have a review of their symptoms, their medicines, and their ability to do their normal activities. They will have blood tests. They will have an electrocardiogram to evaluate their heart. Participants will have a computed tomography (CT) scan, a series of x-rays taken of parts of the body. Participants will get durvalumab on Day 1 of each 28-day cycle. It is given through a small plastic tube that is put in an arm vein. They will take olaparib by mouth twice every day. They will keep a medicine diary. Participants will take the study drugs until their disease gets worse or they have unacceptable side effects. About 30 days after they stop taking the study drugs, participants will have a follow-up visit. Then they will be contacted every 6 months for the rest of their life....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Dose Escalation of DF6002 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, and Expansion in Selected Indications

    This study is a Phase 1 / 2, open-label, dose-escalation study with a consecutive parallel-group efficacy expansion study, designed to determine the safety, tolerability, PK, pharmacodynamics, and preliminary anti-tumor activity of DF6002 as monotherapy and in combination with nivolumab.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Study of BGB-A1217 in Combination With Tislelizumab in Advanced Solid Tumors

    The primary objectives of this study are: to assess the safety and tolerability, to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or maximum administered dose (MAD) and to determine the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of BGB-A1217 in combination with tislelizumab in participants with advanced solid tumors.
    Location: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey

  • Efficacy and Safety of Aldoxorubicin Compared to Topotecan in Subjects With Metastatic Small Cell Lung Cancer

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of aldoxorubicin compared to topotecan in subjects with metastatic small cell lung cancer.
    Location: UT Southwestern / Simmons Cancer Center-Dallas, Dallas, Texas

  • Study of Carfilzomib With Irinotecan in Irinotecan-Sensitive Malignancies and Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    The purpose of this study is to determine a well-tolerated dose of Carfilzomib in combination with Irinotecan (Phase 1b portion of the study) in subjects with relapsed small and non-small cell lung cancer or other irinotecan-sensitive cancers and to assess the 6 month survival of relapsed small cell lung cancer patients treated with this combination therapy. **The Phase 1b portion of the study is now complete**. Phase 2 portion of the study. The safest, maximally tolerated dose established as established in Phase 1 for Phase 2 is as follows -- Carfilzomib will be provided at 20 / 36 mg / m2 with Irinotecan dosed at 125 mg / m2. The purpose of the Phase 2 portion of the study is to assess 6 month survival of relapsed small cell lung cancer ins subjects treated with this combination therapy.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Testing the Combination of the Anti-cancer Drugs XL184 (Cabozantinib) and Nivolumab in Patients with Advanced Cancer and HIV

    This phase I trial investigates the side effects of cabozantinib and nivolumab in treating patients with cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced) and who are undergoing treatment for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Cabozantinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cabozantinib and nivolumab may shrink or stabilize cancer in patients undergoing treatment for HIV.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • A Study of PSB205 in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors

    This is an open-label, multicenter, Phase 1, ascending dose escalation study of PSB205 in subjects with advanced solid tumors. The study will be conducted in 2 parts. Part 1 of the study will be a dose escalation evaluation to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and to establish a recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of PSB205. This study purpose is to describe the safety and tolerability, to assess Pharmacokinetics (PK) and immunogenicity, and to preliminarily assess the anti-tumor activity of PSB205 in subjects with solid tumors. Part 2 of the study will further evaluate the RP2D in 3 distinct tumor cohorts of approximately 12 subjects each.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Study in Patients With Advanced Cancers Associated With Expression of DLL3 Who Have Failed Standard Available Therapy

    An open-label, Phase 1 / 2 study of HPN328 as monotherapy to assess the safety, tolerability and PK in patients with advanced cancers associated with expression of DLL3.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Venetoclax and Irinotecan for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase I / II trial investigates the best dose of venetoclax when given together with irinotecan and to see how well they work in treating patients with small cell lung cancer that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Chemotherapy drugs, such as venetoclax, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Irinotecan may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving venetoclax together with irinotecan may kill more tumor cells in patients with small cell lung cancer.
    Location: Virginia Commonwealth University / Massey Cancer Center, Richmond, Virginia

  • Testing the Addition of an Anti-cancer Drug, BAY 1895344, to Usual Chemotherapy for Advanced Stage Solid Tumors, with a Specific Focus on Patients with Small Cell Lung Cancer, Poorly Differentiated Neuroendocrine Cancer, and Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I trial investigates the side effects and best dose of BAY 1895344 when given together with usual chemotherapy (irinotecan liposome or topotecan) in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body (advanced), with a specific focus on small cell lung cancer, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine cancer, and pancreatic cancer. BAY 1895344 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as irinotecan liposome and topotecan, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Adding BAY 1895344 to irinotecan liposome or topotecan may help to slow the growth of tumors for longer than seen with those drugs alone.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Testing the Addition of an Anti-cancer Drug, BAY 1895344, to the Usual Chemotherapy Treatment (Cisplatin, or Cisplatin and Gemcitabine) for Advanced Solid Tumors with Emphasis on Urothelial Cancer

    This phase I trial investigates the best dose and side effects of BAY 1895344 when given together with chemotherapy in treating patients with solid tumors or urothelial cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). BAY 1895344 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin and gemcitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The purpose of this trial is to test the safety of a drug called BAY 1895344 in combination with the usual chemotherapy treatment (cisplatin, or cisplatin and gemcitabine) for the treatment of advanced solid tumors, including urothelial cancer.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Testing the Addition of an Anti-cancer Drug, Entinostat, to the Usual Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy Treatment (Atezolizumab, Carboplatin and Etoposide) for Previously Untreated Aggressive Lung Cancer that Has Spread

    This phase I trial identifies the best dose and side effects of entinostat in combination with atezolizumab, carboplatin and etoposide for the treatment of previously untreated aggressive lung cancer that has spread (extensive-stage small cell lung cancer). Entinostat and etoposide may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving entinostat in combination with atezolizumab, carboplatin and etoposide may work better than atezolizumab, carboplatin and etoposide alone.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • LB-100, Carboplatin, Etoposide, and Atezolizumab for the Treatment of Untreated Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of LB-100 when given together with carboplatin, etoposide, and atezolizumab for the treatment of untreated extensive-stage small cell lung cancer. Drugs such as carboplatin and etoposide work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. LB‐100 has been shown to make anticancer drugs (chemotherapy) work better at killing cancer. LB‐100 blocks a protein on the surface of cells called PP2A. Blocking this protein makes the tumor cells that express PP2A divide. This allows standard chemotherapy drugs such as carboplatin, etoposide, and atezolizumab work better at killing the tumor cells since these drugs work best at destroying cells that are dividing. Giving LB-100 in combination with standard chemotherapy drugs may work better to treat extensive-stage small cell lung cancer compared to standard chemotherapy drugs alone.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Durvalumab and Topotecan for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the effects of durvalumab and topotecan in treating patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer that has come back (relapsed) or has not responded to previous treatment with chemotherapy and immunotherapy (refractory). Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Topotecan may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth Giving durvalumab and topotecan may help kill more tumor cells and help patients live longer.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota

  • A Study of Sacituzumab Govitecan in Metastatic Solid Tumors (TROPICS-03)

    A Phase 2 Open Label Study of Sacituzumab Govitecan (IMMU0132) in Subjects With Metastatic Solid Tumors
    Location: 8 locations

  • Adjuvant Tumor Lysate Vaccine and Iscomatrix With or Without Metronomic Oral Cyclophosphamide and Celecoxib in Patients With Malignancies Involving Lungs, Esophagus, Pleura, or Mediastinum

    Background: During recent years, cancer-testis (CT) antigens (CTA), particularly those encoded by genes on the X chromosome (CT-X genes), have emerged as attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy. Whereas malignancies of diverse histologies express a variety of CTAs, immune responses to these proteins appear uncommon in cancer patients, possibly due to low-level, heterogeneous antigen expression, as well as immunosuppressive regulatory T cells present within tumor sites and systemic circulation of these individuals. Conceivably, vaccination of cancer patients with tumor cells expressing high levels of CTAs in combination with regimens that deplete or inhibit T regulatory cells will induce broad immunity to these antigens. In order to examine this issue, patients with primary lung and esophageal cancers, pleural mesotheliomas, thoracic sarcomas, thymic neoplasms and mediastinal germ cell tumors, as well as sarcomas, melanomas, germ cell tumors, or epithelial malignancies metastatic to lungs, pleura or mediastinum with no evidence of disease (NED) or minimal residual disease (MRD) following standard multidisciplinary therapy will be vaccinated with H1299 tumor cell lysates with Iscomatrix adjuvant. Vaccines will be administered with or without metronomic oral cyclophosphamide (50 mg PO BID x 7d q 14d), and celecoxib (400 mg PO BID). Serologic responses to a variety of recombinant CTAs as well as immunologic responses to autologous tumor or epigenetically modified autologous EBVtransformed lymphocytes will be assessed before and after a six month vaccination period. Primary Objectives: 1. To assess the frequency of immunologic responses to CTAs in patients with thoracic malignancies following vaccinations with H1299 cell lysate / Iscomatrix(TM) vaccines alone in comparison to patients with thoracic malignancies following vaccinations with H1299 cell lysate / Iscomatrix vaccines in combination with metronomic cyclophosphamide and celecoxib. Secondary Objectives: 1. To examine if oral metronomic cyclophosphamide and celecoxib therapy diminishes the number and percentage of T regulatory cells and diminishes activity of these cells in patients with thoracic malignancies are at risk of recurrence. 2. To examine if H1299 cell lysate / Iscomatrix(TM) vaccination enhances immunologic response to autologous tumor or epigenetically modified autologous EBV-transformed lymphocytes (B cells). Eligibility: - Patients with histologically or cytologically proven small cell or non-small cell lung cancer (SCLC;NSCLC), esophageal cancer (EsC), malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) , thymic or mediastinal germ cell tumors, thoracic sarcomas, or melanomas, sarcomas, or epithelial malignancies metastatic to lungs, pleura or mediastinum who have no clinical evidence of active disease (NED), or minimal residual disease (MRD) not readily accessible by non-invasive biopsy or resection / radiation following standard therapy completed within the past 26 weeks. - Patients must be 18 years or older with an ECOG performance status of 0 2. - Patients must have adequate bone marrow, kidney, liver, lung and cardiac function. - Patients may not be on systemic immunosuppressive medications at time vaccinations commence. Design: - Following recovery from surgery, chemotherapy, or chemo / XRT, patients with NED or MRD will be vaccinated via IM injection with H1299 cell lysates and Iscomatrix(TM) adjuvant monthly for 6 months. - Vaccines will be administered with or without with metronomic oral cyclophosphamide and celecoxib. - Systemic toxicities and immunologic response to therapy will be recorded. Pre and post vaccination serologic and cell mediated responses to a standard panel of CT antigens as well as autologous tumor cells (if available) and EBV-transformed lymphocytes will be assessed before and after vaccination. - Numbers / percentages and function of T regulatory cells in peripheral blood will be assessed before, during, and after vaccinations. - Patients will be followed in the clinic with routine staging scans until disease recurrence. - The trial will randomize 28 evaluable patients per arm to either receive vaccine alone or vaccine plus chemotherapy in order to have 80% power to determine if the frequency of immune responses on the combination arm exceeds that of the vaccine alone arm, if the expected frequencies of immune responses on the two arms
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland