Treatment Clinical Trials for Soft Tissue Sarcoma

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for soft tissue sarcoma treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 76-100 of 147

  • Heated Intra-peritoneal Chemotherapy with Doxorubicin and Cisplatin for the Treatment of Resectable, Refractory, or Recurrent Abdominal or Pelvic Tumors in Pediatric Patients, T.O.A.S.T. I.T. Study

    This early phase I trial studies how well heated intra-peritoneal chemotherapy with doxorubicin and cisplatin work for the treatment of abdominal or pelvic tumors that can be removed by surgery (resectable), does not respond to treatment (refractory), or has come back (recurrent). Heated intra-peritoneal chemotherapy is a procedure performed in combination with abdominal surgery for cancer that has spread to the abdomen. It involves the infusion of a heated chemotherapy solution that circulates into the abdominal cavity. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Heating a chemotherapy solution and infusing it directly into the abdomen may kill more cells.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Cabozantinib and Temozolomide for the Treatment of Unresectable or Metastatic Leiomyosarcoma or Other Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well cabozantinib and temozolomide work in treating patients with leiomyosarcoma or other soft tissue sarcoma that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Cabozantinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving cabozantinib and temozolomide may work better than either one alone in treating patients with leiomyosarcoma or other soft tissue sarcoma. Cabozantinib is an investigational drug, which means that it has not been approved by the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or any other regulatory agencies for sale or use by the public for the indication under investigation in this study.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Focused Ultrasound for the Promotion of Immune Responses for Resectable Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma

    This trial evaluates whether pre-surgical treatment with a high energy ultrasound device is safe and would stimulate the body’s immune system to help fight off a certain kind of tumor, called an undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma. This device is called the ExAblate System and the treatment delivered by the ExAblate System device is called “focused ultrasound” treatment. The ExAblate System is a non-invasive thermal ablation device fully integrated with a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging system and used for ablation of soft tissue and bone.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • Prexasertib and Irinotecan for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor or Rhabdomyosarcoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose, the side effects, and how well prexasertib and irinotecan work in treating patients with desmoplastic small cell tumor or rhabdomysosarcoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Prexasertib is a type of medication called a checkpoint kinase inhibitor. It works by stopping cancer cells from repairing damage to themselves and their deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (genes), which may lead to death of cancer cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The purpose of this study is to test whether prexasertib is a safe and effective treatment for patients with desmoplastic small round cell tumor or rhabdomyosarcoma when given with irinotecan.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Lymphodepletion with Adoptive Cell Therapy and High-Dose IL-2 for the Treatment of Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma in Young Adult Patients

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of adoptively transferred tumor-specific T cells and high-dose aldesleukin (IL-2) and to see how well they work in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Fludarabine and cyclophosphamide are two types of chemotherapy drugs used in lymphodepletion. The purpose of lymphodepletion in this study is to temporarily reduce the number of normal lymphocytes circulating in the body before tumor infiltrating lymphocytes are infused. This is so that there will be more “space” for the lymphocytes that will be infused in the veins.Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes involve the use of special immune cells called T-cells. A T-cell is a type of lymphocyte, or white blood cell. Lymphocytes protect the body from viral infections, help other cells fight bacterial and fungal infections, produce antibodies, fight cancers, and coordinate the activities of other cells in the immune system. These special immune T-cells are taken from a sample of tumor tissue that is surgically removed, then multiplied in a laboratory, and infused back into the patient. IL-2 may help the body's response to treatment on the immune system.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Doxorubicin, AGEN1884, and AGEN2034 for the Treatment of Advanced or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well doxorubicin together with AGEN1884 and AGEN2034 work in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma that has spread to other places in the body (advanced or metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as AGEN1884 and AGEN2034, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving doxorubicin, AGEN1884, and AGEN2034 may work better in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma compared to doxorubicin alone.
    Location: University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado

  • Phase Ib Study of TNO155 in Combination With Spartalizumab or Ribociclib in Selected Malignancies

    This study is a Phase Ib, multi-center, open-label study of TNO155 in combination with spartalizumab or ribociclib with a dose escalation part followed by a dose expansion part in adult subjects with advanced solid tumors. These two treatment arms will enroll subjects in parallel to characterize the safety, tolerability, PK, PD and preliminary antitumor activity. The study treatment will be administered until the subject experiences unacceptable toxicity, progressive disease, and / or has treatment discontinued at the discretion of the Investigator or the subject, or due to withdrawal of consent.
    Location: Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Unresectable or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well hypofractionated radiation therapy works in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Hypofractionated radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that delivers intense doses of radiation to cancer cells over fewer treatments to help minimize damage to healthy tissue. Hypofractionated radiotherapy involves the use of sophisticated image guidance that pinpoints the exact three-dimensional location of a tumor so that the radiation can be more precisely delivered to cancer cells. This study examines how well hypofractionated radiotherapy controls soft tissue sarcomas and the side effects from using hypofractionated radiotherapy to treat these tumors.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • A Study in Patients With Different Types of Advanced Cancer (Solid Tumors) to Test Different Doses of BI 907828 in Combination With BI 754091 and 754111

    Phase Ia - Dose Escalation The main objective of the dose-escalation part is to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of BI 907828 in combination with BI 754091 and BI 754111, based on the frequency of patients experiencing dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), and / or the recommended dose for further development of BI 907828 in combination with BI 754091 and BI 754111, and to evaluate safety and tolerability of BI 907828 in combination with BI 754091 and BI 754111 by monitoring the occurrence and severity of adverse events (AEs). The secondary objectives are the determination of the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of BI 907828, BI 754091 and BI 754111 based on Cmax and AUC0-tz, and the preliminary assessment of anti-tumor activity. Phase Ib - Dose Expansion The main objective of the dose-expansion part is to assess the preliminary efficacy of the combination of BI 907828, BI 754091, and BI 754111. The secondary and further objectives are to further assess the safety, the PK profiles at the recommended dose for expansion (RDE), and to determine the Recommended Phase II Dose (RP2D).
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Paclitaxel and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Cutaneous Angiosarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well paclitaxel and radiation therapy work in treating patients with cutaneous (skin) angiosarcoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Cutaneous angiosarcoma is usually treated with paclitaxel followed by surgery. Treating cutaneous angiosarcoma more aggressively by adding radiation therapy to paclitaxel may improve initial response to treatment and delay or prevent the cancer from coming back after surgery.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Hu3F8-BsAb in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Neuroblastoma, Osteosarcoma, or other GD2 Positive Solid Tumors

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of Hu3F8-BsAb, and how well it works in treating patients with neuroblastoma, osteosarcoma, or other GD2 positive solid tumors that have come back or does not respond to treatment. Immunotherapy with Hu3F8-BsAb, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Papaverine Hydrochloride and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer or Lung Metastases

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and how well papaverine hydrochloride and stereotactic radiation therapy body (SBRT) work in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer or cancer that has spread to the lung (lung metastases). Papaverine hydrochloride may help radiation therapy work better by making tumor cells more sensitive to the radiation therapy. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving papaverine hydrochloride with SBRT may work in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer or lung metastases.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Shorter Course, Hypofractionated Pre-Surgery Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Localized, Resectable Soft Tissue Sarcoma of the Extremity of Superficial Trunk

    This phase II trial studies the wound complication risk of shorter course, hypofractionated pre-surgery radiation therapy in treating patients with localized soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity of superficial trunk that can be removed by surgery. Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivers higher doses of radiation therapy over a shorter period of time and may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects. Shorter course hypofractionated pre surgery radiation therapy may be more convenient for patients with soft tissue sarcoma than a longer course of radiation therapy, and may result in fewer complications.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • CBL0137 in Treating Patients with Advanced Extremity Melanoma or Sarcoma

    This phase I trial studies best dose and side effects of CBL0137 in treating patients with extremity melanoma or sarcoma that has spread to other places in the body. Drugs, such as CBL0137, may work by binding to tumor cell deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) to stop the cell from growing further.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • APX005M and Doxorubicin in Treating Patients with Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well APX005M works when given together with standard of care doxorubicin in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Immunotherapy with APX005M, may induce changes in the body’s immune system, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving APX005M and doxorubicin may work better in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma.
    Location: NYP / Columbia University Medical Center / Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • A Study of EGFR806 CAR T-Cell Immunotherapy for Treating Children and Young Adults with Recurrent / Refractory Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies side effects and best dose of EGFR806-specific and EGFR806xCD19 CAR T cells and how well they work in treating patients with solid tumors that have come back (recurrent) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). T cells are a type of immune cell that can recognize proteins on the surface of other cells and then target and kill cells that have that protein. Some solid tumor cells have an EGFR protein on their surface, and T cells can be modified with a receptor, called a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), to help recognize this protein and kill these tumor cells; this is the treatment in Arm A of this study. In Arm B of this study, researchers will modify T cells to recognize EGFR as well as a protein called CD19; CD19 is present on the surface of a group of normal white blood cells called B cells. Researchers hypothesize that modifying T cells to be directed against CD19 in addition to EGFR may act as an additional signal to help the T cells directed against EGFR to grow better and last longer.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • High Dose Ascorbate and Radiation Therapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Stage IIB-IV Soft Tissue Sarcomas of Extremity, Trunk, and Retroperitoneum

    This trial studies the side effects of high dose ascorbate and how well it works in combination with external beam radiation therapy before surgery in treating patients with stage IIB-IV soft tissue sarcomas of extremity, trunk, and retroperitoneum. High dose ascorbate (Vitamin C) may kill cancer cells. External beam radiation therapy delivers high-energy beams to the tumor from outside of the body. The purpose of this study is to see if high dose ascorbate in combination with radiation therapy will reduce the size of the tumor. High doses of ascorbate together with radiation therapy may work better in killing the cancer cells than either treatment alone.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • LN-145 or LN-145-S1 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Ovarian Cancer, Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer, Osteosarcoma, or Other Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    This phase II trial studies how well autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes LN-145 (LN-145) or LN-145-S1 works in treating patients with ovarian cancer, anaplastic thyroid cancer, osteosarcoma, or other bone and soft tissue sarcomas that do not respond to treatment (refractory) or that has come back (relapsed). LN-145 is made by collecting and growing specialized white blood cells (called T-cells) that are collected from the patient's tumor. LN-145-S1 is made using a modified process that chooses a specific portion of the T-cells. The T cells may specifically recognize, target, and kill the tumor cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Study Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of Eribulin Mesilate in Combination With Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Children With Refractory or Recurrent Solid Tumors

    The Phase 1 part of the study is conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and Recommended Phase 2 Dose (RP2D) of eribulin mesilate in combination with irinotecan hydrochloride in pediatric participants with relapsed / refractory solid tumors (excluding central nervous system [CNS] tumors). The Phase 2 part of the study is conducted to assess the objective response rate (ORR) and duration of response (DOR) of eribulin mesilate in combination with irinotecan hydrochloride in pediatric participants with relapsed / refractory rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcoma (NRSTS) and ewing sarcoma (EWS).
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • QUILT-3.031: AMG 337 in Subjects With Advanced or Metastatic Clear Cell Sarcoma

    This is a phase 2 study that will assess the efficacy of AMG 337 in subjects with advanced or metastatic clear cell sarcoma that contains the EWSR1-ATF1 gene fusion.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Durvalumab, Tremelimumab, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Participants with High Risk Soft-Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of durvalumab, tremelimumab, and radiation therapy and to see how well they work in treating participants with high risk soft-tissue sarcoma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving durvalumab, tremelimumab, and radiation therapy may work better at treating high risk soft-tissue sarcoma.
    Location: University of Maryland / Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Ganitumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Embryonal or Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of dasatinib when given together with ganitumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with embryonal and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Dasatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with ganitumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving dasatinib and ganitumab may work better in treating patients with embryonal and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma compared to standard treatment, including surgery, radiation, and / or chemotherapy.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Akt / ERK Inhibitor ONC201 in Treating Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumors That Are Locally Advanced, Metastatic, Recurrent, Refractory, or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well akt / ERK inhibitor ONC201 works in treating patients with neuroendocrine tumors that have spread to nearby tissues or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or other places in the body (metastatic), have come back (recurrent), do not respond to treatment (refractory), or cannot be removed by surgery (unresctable). Akt / ERK inhibitor ONC201 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Safety and Efficacy of MAK683 in Adult Patients With Advanced Malignancies

    The purpose of this Phase I / II study is to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and / or recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) and to evaluate the safety, antitumor activity and pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of MAK683 in patients with advanced malignancies such as Diffuse Large B cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) or other advanced solid tumors for whom no further effective standard treatment is available.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Dexrazoxane Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well doxorubicin hydrochloride and dexrazoxane hydrochloride work in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment and cannot be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Chemoprotective drugs, such as dexrazoxane hydrochloride, may protect normal cells from the side effects of chemotherapy. Giving doxorubicin hydrochloride and dexrazoxane hydrochloride may work better in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri