Treatment Clinical Trials for Soft Tissue Sarcoma

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for soft tissue sarcoma treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 76-100 of 126

  • Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Unresectable or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well stereotactic body radiation therapy works in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • A Modified Virus (Talimogene Laherparepvec) in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Cutaneous Angiosarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well talimogene laherparepvec works in treating patients with cutaneous angiosarcoma that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). Talimogene laherparepvec is form of modified herpes simplex virus type-1 (the ‘cold sore’ virus) that can destroy tumor cells while leaving normal cells alone. The virus’ genes are modified in a laboratory so that it produces a protein called human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and multiplies and grows in tumor cells. Human GM-CSF is normally produced by various cells within the body and is used as a medicine to treat patients with white blood cell counts that are too low. This modified herpes simplex virus type-1 is not designed to change any genes, but instead may kill tumor cells directly, as well as stimulate the immune system to kill tumor cells throughout the body.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Paclitaxel and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Cutaneous Angiosarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well paclitaxel and radiation therapy work in treating patients with cutaneous (skin) angiosarcoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Cutaneous angiosarcoma is usually treated with paclitaxel followed by surgery. Treating cutaneous angiosarcoma more aggressively by adding radiation therapy to paclitaxel may improve initial response to treatment and delay or prevent the cancer from coming back after surgery.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Selinexor and Ixazomib for the Treatment of Locally Advanced Unresectable or Metastatic Sarcoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of selinexor when given together with ixazomib in treating patients with sarcoma that has spread from its original site of growth to nearby tissues or lymph nodes and is not amenable to surgical resection (locally advanced unresectable) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Selinexor blocks the activity of a protein which transports certain molecules between different parts of a cell. Many cancers disrupt the normal location of proteins and other molecules to allow the cancer to keep growing. Ixazomib is proteasome inhibitor. Proteasomes are responsible for breaking down certain proteins within the cell. Ixazomib allows some proteins and molecules to remain active for a longer time. Selinexor may work better in treating sarcoma when combined with ixazomib.
    Location: NYP / Columbia University Medical Center / Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Hu3F8-BsAb in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Neuroblastoma, Osteosarcoma, or other GD2 Positive Solid Tumors

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of Hu3F8-BsAb, and how well it works in treating patients with neuroblastoma, osteosarcoma, or other GD2 positive solid tumors that have come back or does not respond to treatment. Immunotherapy with Hu3F8-BsAb, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Shorter Course, Hypofractionated Pre-Surgery Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Localized, Resectable Soft Tissue Sarcoma of the Extremity of Superficial Trunk

    This phase II trial studies the wound complication risk of shorter course, hypofractionated pre-surgery radiation therapy in treating patients with localized soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity of superficial trunk that can be removed by surgery. Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivers higher doses of radiation therapy over a shorter period of time and may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects. Shorter course hypofractionated pre surgery radiation therapy may be more convenient for patients with soft tissue sarcoma than a longer course of radiation therapy, and may result in fewer complications.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Kidney Tumors

    This pilot trial studies how well pencil beam scanning proton therapy works in treating patients with kidney tumors. Usual treatment for patients with kidney tumors is radiation using x-rays. X-ray radiation kills tumor cells, but can also cause harm to normal parts of the body such as the bowel and liver. Pencil beam scanning proton beam radiation also kills tumor cells, but can be stopped after the treatment is given to the area where the tumor cells are or were. This results in less radiation to normal parts of the body. This study tests whether pencil beam scanning proton beam radiation works as well as x-ray radiation therapy.
    Location: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • CBL0137 in Treating Patients with Advanced Extremity Melanoma or Sarcoma

    This phase I trial studies best dose and side effects of CBL0137 in treating patients with extremity melanoma or sarcoma that has spread to other places in the body. Drugs, such as CBL0137, may work by binding to tumor cell deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) to stop the cell from growing further.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • APX005M and Doxorubicin in Treating Patients with Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well APX005M works when given together with standard of care doxorubicin in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Immunotherapy with APX005M, may induce changes in the body’s immune system, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving APX005M and doxorubicin may work better in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma.
    Location: NYP / Columbia University Medical Center / Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Phase 1a Study to Evaluate Immunogenicity of ASV

    This is an open-label Phase 1a First-in-Human Study to determine Safety and Tolerability of ASV™ AGEN2017 with QS-21 Stimulon® Adjuvant as a Single Agent in Subjects With Tumors at Risk of Relapse Undergoing Observation as Standard of Care Following Complete Surgical Resection.
    Location: University of Miami Miller School of Medicine-Sylvester Cancer Center, Miami, Florida

  • Itacitinib in Treating Patients with Refractory Metastatic / Advanced Soft Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well itacitinib works in treating patients with soft tissue sarcomas that do not respond to treatment (refractory) and have spread to other parts of the body (advanced / metastatic). Itacitinib may cause changes in the immune system and the body's immune response to cancer, which may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Sunitinib in Sarcomas of the Central Nervous System

    Background: A sarcoma is a rare cancer. It grows in the body s connective tissue. Sarcomas in the brain and central nervous system are especially rare. The drug Sunitinib has been approved in many countries for treating other types of rare or advanced cancers. These include kidney, pancreas, and bowel cancer. Researchers want to see if it can help people with sarcomas of the central nervous system. Objective: To study the effects of Sunitinib on gliosarcomas or sarcomas of the central nervous system. Eligibility: Adults ages 18 and older with a gliosarcoma or sarcoma of the central nervous system Design: Participants will be screened with the following tests. Some may be done as part of their regular cancer care: Medical history Medication review Physical exam Blood, heart, and pregnancy tests Cranial scans to locate and measure their tumor Participants will take Sunitinib by mouth every day for 2 weeks and then take none of the drug for 1 week. These 3 weeks equal 1 cycle. Participants will have 2 study visits in cycle 1. They will have 1 visit in all other cycles. They will answer questions about quality of life and repeat some screening tests. Participants will take their blood pressure at home weekly. They keep a diary of each dose of Sunitinib and blood pressure reading. Participants can choose to share data about their physical activity levels and quality of sleep. These participants will wear a small, portable watch-sized accelerometer device on the wrist for 6 cycles. About 1 month after their last study drug dose, participants will have a final study visit. They will have a physical exam, blood tests, and scans.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Temozolomide in Treating Patients with Advanced SDH-Mutant Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    This phase II trial studies how well temozolomide work in treating patients with succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)-mutant gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of California San Diego, San Diego, California

  • High Dose Ascorbate and Radiation Therapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Stage IIB-IV Soft Tissue Sarcomas of Extremity, Trunk, and Retroperitoneum

    This trial studies the side effects of high dose ascorbate and how well it works in combination with external beam radiation therapy before surgery in treating patients with stage IIB-IV soft tissue sarcomas of extremity, trunk, and retroperitoneum. High dose ascorbate (Vitamin C) may kill cancer cells. External beam radiation therapy delivers high-energy beams to the tumor from outside of the body. The purpose of this study is to see if high dose ascorbate in combination with radiation therapy will reduce the size of the tumor. High doses of ascorbate together with radiation therapy may work better in killing the cancer cells than either treatment alone.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • This Study Aims to Find the Best Dose of BI 907828 in Patients With Different Types of Advanced Cancer (Solid Tumors)

    Phase Ia - The main objective of the dose-escalation part of the trial is to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), based on the frequency of patients experiencing dose limiting toxicities (DLT) during the first treatment cycle, and the recommended dose for expansion (RDE) of BI 907828 monotherapy, and to evaluate its safety and tolerability, by monitoring the occurrence and severity of adverse events (AEs), in two different schedules (Arm A with one single dose every 21 days, Arm B with one single dose on Days 1 and 8, every 28 days). The secondary objectives are the determination of the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of BI 907828 monotherapy, and the preliminary assessment of anti-tumor activity in patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors. Phase Ib - In the expansion cohorts of the trial, the main objectives are to assess efficacy, and to further assess the safety, and PK profiles at the RDE, and determine the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D).
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • LN-145 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Ovarian Cancer, Osteosarcoma, or Other Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    This phase II trial studies how well autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes LN-145 (LN-145) works in treating patients with ovarian cancer, osteosarcoma, or other bone and soft tissue sarcomas that do not respond to treatment (refractory) or that has come back (relapsed). LN-145 is made by collecting and growing specialized white blood cells (called T-cells) that are collected from the patient's tumor. The T cells may specifically recognize, target, and kill the tumor cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Modified Immune Cells (NYCE T Cells) in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Multiple Myeloma, Melanoma, Synovial Sarcoma, or Myxoid / Round Cell Liposarcoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of NYCE T cells in treating patients with multiple myeloma, melanoma, synovial sarcoma, or myxoid / round cell liposarcoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). NYCE T cells are gene-modified using a lentiviral vector, which works by inserting genetic material into the cells, which may allow them to identify and possibly kill cancer cells.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Nivolumab with and without Ipilimumab and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Resectable Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma or Dedifferentiated Liposarcoma before Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab with and without ipilimumab and radiation therapy when given before surgery works in treating patients with undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma or dedifferentiated liposarcoma that can be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving nivolumab, ipilimumab, and radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Study Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of Eribulin Mesilate in Combination With Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Children With Refractory or Recurrent Solid Tumors

    The Phase 1 part of the study is conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and Recommended Phase 2 Dose (RP2D) of eribulin mesilate in combination with irinotecan hydrochloride in pediatric participants with relapsed / refractory solid tumors {excluding central nervous system (CNS) tumors}. The Phase 2 part of the study is conducted to assess the objective response rate (ORR) and duration of response (DOR) of eribulin mesilate in combination with irinotecan hydrochloride in pediatric participants with relapsed / refractory rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcoma (NRSTS) and ewing sarcoma (EWS).
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy Followed by Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients with Stage II Endometrial Cancer after Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well vaginal cuff brachytherapy (radiation to the upper part of the vagina) followed by carboplatin and paclitaxel works in treating patients with stage II endometrial cancer after surgery. Brachytherapy, also known as internal radiation therapy, uses radioactive material placed directly into or near a tumor to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving carboplatin and paclitaxel following vaginal cuff brachytherapy may work better than the standard treatment of radiation to the vagina or entire pelvis.
    Location: Stephenson Cancer Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

  • Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Nivolumab in People With Select Rare CNS Cancers

    Background: More than 130 primary tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) have been identified. Most affect less than 1,000 people in the United States each year. Because these tumors are so rare, there are few proven therapies. This study will test whether the immunotherapy drug nivolumab is an effective treatment for people with rare CNS tumors. Objectives: To learn if stimulating the immune system using the drug nivolumab can shrink tumors in people with rare CNS (brain or spine) tumors or increase the time it takes for these tumors to grow or spread. Eligibility: Adults whose rare CNS tumor has returned. Design: Participants will be screened: - Heart and blood tests - Physical and neurological exam - Hepatitis tests - Pregnancy test - MRI. They will lay in a machine that takes pictures. - Tumor tissue sample. This can be from a previous procedure. At the start of the study, participants will have blood tests. They will answer questions about their symptoms and their quality of life. Participants will get nivolumab in a vein every 2 weeks for up to 64 weeks. Participants will have monthly blood tests. Every other month they will have an MRI and a neurologic function test. They will also answer questions about their quality of life. Genetic tests will be done on participants tumor tissue. Participants will be contacted if any clinically important results are found. After treatment ends, participants will be monitored for up to 5 years. They will have a series of MRIs and neurological function tests. They will be asked to report any symptoms they experience....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • QUILT-3.031: AMG 337 in Subjects With Advanced or Metastatic Clear Cell Sarcoma

    This is a phase 2 study that will assess the efficacy of AMG 337 in subjects with advanced or metastatic clear cell sarcoma that contains the EWSR1-ATF1 gene fusion.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Durvalumab, Tremelimumab, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Participants with High Risk Soft-Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of durvalumab, tremelimumab, and radiation therapy and to see how well they work in treating participants with high risk soft-tissue sarcoma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving durvalumab, tremelimumab, and radiation therapy may work better at treating high risk soft-tissue sarcoma.
    Location: University of Maryland / Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Talimogene Laherparepvec and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Sarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well talimogene laherparepvec and pembrolizumab work in treating patients with sarcoma that has spread to other places in the body. Talimogene laherparepvec may cause tumor cell death directly in the area of tumor that it is injected into and help the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells present at other sites in the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving talimogene laherparepvec and pembrolizumab may work better in treating patients with sarcoma.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Ganitumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Embryonal or Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of dasatinib when given together with ganitumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with embryonal and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Dasatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with ganitumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving dasatinib and ganitumab may work better in treating patients with embryonal and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland