Treatment Clinical Trials for Soft Tissue Sarcoma

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for soft tissue sarcoma treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 101-125 of 135

  • Study Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of Eribulin Mesilate in Combination With Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Children With Refractory or Recurrent Solid Tumors

    The Phase 1 part of the study is conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and Recommended Phase 2 Dose (RP2D) of eribulin mesilate in combination with irinotecan hydrochloride in pediatric participants with relapsed / refractory solid tumors (excluding central nervous system [CNS] tumors). The Phase 2 part of the study is conducted to assess the objective response rate (ORR) and duration of response (DOR) of eribulin mesilate in combination with irinotecan hydrochloride in pediatric participants with relapsed / refractory rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcoma (NRSTS) and ewing sarcoma (EWS).
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Nivolumab in People With Select Rare CNS Cancers

    Background: More than 130 primary tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) have been identified. Most affect less than 1,000 people in the United States each year. Because these tumors are so rare, there are few proven therapies. This study will test whether the immunotherapy drug nivolumab is an effective treatment for people with rare CNS tumors. Objectives: To learn if stimulating the immune system using the drug nivolumab can shrink tumors in people with rare CNS (brain or spine) tumors or increase the time it takes for these tumors to grow or spread. Eligibility: Adults whose rare CNS tumor has returned. Design: Participants will be screened: - Heart and blood tests - Physical and neurological exam - Hepatitis tests - Pregnancy test - MRI. They will lay in a machine that takes pictures. - Tumor tissue sample. This can be from a previous procedure. At the start of the study, participants will have blood tests. They will answer questions about their symptoms and their quality of life. Participants will get nivolumab in a vein every 2 weeks for up to 64 weeks. Participants will have monthly blood tests. Every other month they will have an MRI and a neurologic function test. They will also answer questions about their quality of life. Genetic tests will be done on participants' tumor tissue. Participants will be contacted if any clinically important results are found. After treatment ends, participants will be monitored for up to 5 years. They will have a series of MRIs and neurological function tests. They will be asked to report any symptoms they experience....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • QUILT-3.031: AMG 337 in Subjects With Advanced or Metastatic Clear Cell Sarcoma

    This is a phase 2 study that will assess the efficacy of AMG 337 in subjects with advanced or metastatic clear cell sarcoma that contains the EWSR1-ATF1 gene fusion.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Durvalumab, Tremelimumab, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Participants with High Risk Soft-Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of durvalumab, tremelimumab, and radiation therapy and to see how well they work in treating participants with high risk soft-tissue sarcoma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving durvalumab, tremelimumab, and radiation therapy may work better at treating high risk soft-tissue sarcoma.
    Location: University of Maryland / Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • A Study Evaluating MM-310 in Patients With Solid Tumors

    MM-310 is a liposomal formulation of a docetaxel prodrug that targets the EphA2 receptor on cancer cells. Docetaxel is an approved chemotherapeutic drug.This study is a Phase 1 open-label study of MM-310 in patients with solid tumors. In the first part of the study, MM-310 will be assessed as a monotherapy until a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is established. After an MTD of MM-310 as a monotherapy is established, an expansion cohort and MM-310 in combination with other therapies will be assessed.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Talimogene Laherparepvec and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Sarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well talimogene laherparepvec and pembrolizumab work in treating patients with sarcoma that has spread to other places in the body. Talimogene laherparepvec may cause tumor cell death directly in the area of tumor that it is injected into and help the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells present at other sites in the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving talimogene laherparepvec and pembrolizumab may work better in treating patients with sarcoma.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Ganitumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Embryonal or Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of dasatinib when given together with ganitumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with embryonal and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Dasatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with ganitumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving dasatinib and ganitumab may work better in treating patients with embryonal and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma compared to standard treatment, including surgery, radiation, and / or chemotherapy.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Akt / ERK Inhibitor ONC201 in Treating Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumors That Are Locally Advanced, Metastatic, Recurrent, Refractory, or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well akt / ERK inhibitor ONC201 works in treating patients with neuroendocrine tumors that have spread to other places in the body, have come back, do not respond to treatment, or cannot be removed by surgery. Akt / ERK inhibitor ONC201 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Safety and Efficacy of MAK683 in Adult Patients With Advanced Malignancies

    The purpose of this Phase I / II study is to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and / or recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) and to evaluate the safety, antitumor activity and pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of MAK683 in patients with advanced malignancies such as Diffuse Large B cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) or other advanced solid tumors for whom no further effective standard treatment is available.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Universal Donor Natural Killer Cells and ALT-803 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Blood Cancer, Colon / Rectal Cancer, or Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of universal donor natural killer cells when given together with superagonist interleukin-15:interleukin-15 receptor alphaSu / Fc fusion complex ALT-803 (ALT-803) in treating patients with blood cancer, colon / rectal cancer, or soft tissue sarcoma that has come back after a period of improvement (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Natural killer cells are a type of white blood cell that may kill tumor cells. ALT-803 may enhance natural killer cell survival and enable them to increase in number after infusion. Giving natural killer cells and ALT-803 may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Pomalidomide in Combination With Liposomal Doxorubicin in People With Advanced or Refractory Kaposi Sarcoma

    Background: Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a cancer most often seen in people with HIV. It causes lesions. These are usually on the skin but sometimes in the lymph nodes, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract. Researchers think a combination of drugs may help treat KS. Objective: To test a combination of the anti-cancer drugs pomalidomide (CC-4047) and liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) in people with KS. Eligibility: People ages 18 and over with KS Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Questionnaires Physical exam Blood, urine, and heart tests Chest X-ray Biopsy: A small sample of tissue is taken from a KS lesion. Possible CT scan Possible exam of lungs or gastrointestinal tract with an endoscope: A flexible instrument examines inside the organ. Participants will take the drugs in 4-week cycles. They will take Doxil through an IV on Day 1 of each cycle. They will take CC-4047 tablets by mouth each day for the first 3 weeks of each cycle. Participants will have many visits: Before starting treatment To start each cycle Day 15 of first 2 cycles Visits include repeats of screening tests and: Multiple blood draws Photographs of lesions Participants will keep a drug diary. Participants will take aspirin or other drugs to prevent blood clots. Participants with HIV will have combination antiretroviral therapy. Some participants will have a PET scan. Participants will continue treatment as long as they tolerate it and their KS improves. After treatment, they will have several follow-up visits for up to 5 years ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Gene-Modified T cells with or without Decitabine in Treating Patients with Advanced Malignancies Expressing NY-ESO-1

    This phase I / IIa trial studies the side effects and best dose of gene-modified T cells when given with or without decitabine, and to see how well they work in treating patients with malignancies expressing cancer-testis antigens 1 (NY-ESO-1) gene that have spread to other places in the body (advanced). A T cell is a type of immune cell that can recognize and kill abnormal cells of the body. Placing a modified gene for NY-ESO-1 into the patients' T cells in the laboratory and then giving them back to the patient may help the body build an immune response to kill tumor cells that express NY-ESO-1. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as decitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving gene-modified T cells with or without decitabine works better in treating patients with malignancies expressing NY-ESO-1.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Dexrazoxane Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well doxorubicin hydrochloride and dexrazoxane hydrochloride work in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment and cannot be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Chemoprotective drugs, such as dexrazoxane hydrochloride, may protect normal cells from the side effects of chemotherapy. Giving doxorubicin hydrochloride and dexrazoxane hydrochloride may work better in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • A Study to Test the Effect of the Drug Larotrectinib in Adults and Children With NTRK-fusion Positive Solid Tumors

    This research study is done to test how well different types of cancer respond to the drug called larotrectinib. The cancer must have a change in a particular gene (NTRK1, NTRK2 or NTRK3). Larotrectinib is a drug that blocks the actions of these NTRK genes in cancer cells and can therefore be used to treat cancer.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Genetically Modified Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Zoledronic Acid in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed / Refractory Hematologic Malignancies or High Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of zoledronic acid given after genetically modified donor stem cell transplant in treating younger patients with hematologic malignancies or high risk tumors that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When healthy stem cells from a donor that have been genetically modified are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus after the transplant may stop this from happening. Giving zoledronic acid after the transplant may help strengthen the immune system and make the immune cells work better.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • PLX3397 in Children and Young Adults With Refractory Leukemias and Refractory Solid Tumors Including Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) Associated Plexiform Neurofibromas (PN)

    Background: - Some people with cancer have solid tumors. Others have refractory leukemia. This doesn t go away after treatment. Researchers want to see if a drug called PLX3397 can shrink tumors or stop them from growing. Objectives: - To find the highest safe dose and side effects of PLX3397. To see if it helps treat certain types of cancer. Eligibility: - People ages 3 22 with a solid tumor or leukemia that has returned or not responded to cancer therapies. - For Phase II, people ages 3 31 with a Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) Associated Plexiform Neurofibroma (PN) that cannot be removed with surgery. Design: - Participants will be screened with: - Medical history - Physical exam - Blood and urine tests - Heart tests - Scans or other tests of the tumor - Participants will take PLX3397 as a capsule once daily for a 28-day cycle. They can do this for up to 2 years. - During the study, participants will have many tests and procedures. They include repeats of the screening tests. Participants will keep a diary of symptoms. - Participants with solid tumors will have scans or x-rays. - Participants with NF1 PN will have MRI scans. - Participants with leukemia will have blood tests. They may have a bone marrow sample taken. - Some participants may have a biopsy. - When finished taking PLX3397, participants will have follow-up visits. They will repeat the screening tests and note side effects. - Phase II will follow the same procedures as Phase I above, but participants will also fill out questionnaires about their pain and quality of life.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Nab-Paclitaxel and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients with Unresectable Stage IV Melanoma or Gynecological Cancers

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of nab-paclitaxel and bevacizumab in treating patients with stage IV melanoma that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) or with cancer of the cervix, endometrium, ovary, fallopian tube or peritoneal cavity. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving nab paclitaxel and bevacizumab may kill more tumor cells than nab-paclitaxel alone.
    Location: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Binimetinib and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients with Untreated Advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and the best dose of binimetinib when given together with imatinib mesylate and to see how well they work in treating patients with untreated gastrointestinal stromal tumors that have spread from where they started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes or to other places in the body (advanced). Binimetinib and imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Vorinostat, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Docetaxel in Treating Patients with Soft Tissue Sarcoma That is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of vorinostat when given together with gemcitabine hydrochloride and docetaxel and to see how well they work in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery. Vorinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride and docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving vorinostat with combination chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells than giving either one alone.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well a donor bone marrow transplant works in treating patients with solid tumors that are likely to recur (come back) or spread. Giving low doses of chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells when they do not exactly match the patient's blood. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Ipilimumab and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ipilimumab and imatinib mesylate in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving ipilimumab and imatinib mesylate may work better in treating patients with solid tumors.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Bevacizumab and Temsirolimus Alone or in Combination with Valproic Acid or Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Malignancy or Other Benign Disease

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of bevacizumab and temsirolimus alone or in combination with valproic acid or cetuximab in treating patients with a malignancy that has spread to other places in the body or other disease that is not cancerous. Immunotherapy with bevacizumab and cetuximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Temsirolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as valproic acid, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether bevacizumab and temsirolimus work better when given alone or with valproic acid or cetuximab in treating patients with a malignancy or other disease that is not cancerous.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Pazopanib Hydrochloride and Abexinostat in Treating Patients with Metastatic Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of pazopanib hydrochloride and abexinostat in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other parts of the body. Pazopanib hydrochloride and abexinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody 8H9 in Treating Patients with Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors and Other Solid Tumors Involving the Peritoneum

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of iodine I 131 monoclonal antibody 8H9 in treating patients with small round cell tumors that cause or form adhesions or fibrous connective tissue within a tumor (desmoplastic) and other solid tumors involving the peritoneum. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, such as iodine I 131 monoclonal antibody 8H9, can find tumor cells and carry tumor-killing substances to them without harming normal cells.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody 8H9 in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Tumors in the Brain and / or Spinal Cord

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of iodine I 131 monoclonal antibody 8H9 in treating patients with tumors in the brain and / or spinal cord that have come back or have not responded to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies can find tumor cells and carry tumor-killing substances to them. The antibody 8H9 can carry a radioactive substance, such as iodine I 131, to tumor cells and may help kill them.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York