Treatment Clinical Trials for Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Origin

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for carcinoma of unknown primary origin treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-13 of 13
  • Radiation Therapy with Durvalumab or Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Who Cannot Take Cisplatin

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies how well radiation therapy works with durvalumab or cetuximab in treating patients with head and neck cancer that has spread to a local and / or regional area of the body who cannot take cisplatin. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab or cetuximab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not known if radiation therapy with durvalumab will work better than the usual therapy of radiation therapy with cetuximab in treating patients with head and neck cancer.
    Location: 145 locations

  • Ficlatuzumab with or without Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Cetuximab-Resistant, Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well ficlatuzumab with or without cetuximab work in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that has come back or spread to other places in the body and resistant to cetuximab treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ficlatuzumab and cetuximab, may block growth signals that lets a tumor cell survive and reproduce, and helps the immune system recognize and fight head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Cisplatin, Nab-Paclitaxel, and Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma That Is Metastatic, Locally Recurrent, or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well cisplatin, nab-paclitaxel, and cetuximab work in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that has spread to another place in the body, has come back locally, or cannot be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cisplatin, nab-paclitaxel, and cetuximab may be an effective treatment for cancer of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Cetuximab and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Oral Cavity, Oropharyngeal, Paranasal Sinus, Hypopharyngeal, or Laryngeal Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and how well cetuximab and nivolumab work in treating patients with oral cavity, oropharyngeal, paranasal sinus, hypopharyngeal, or laryngeal cancer that have come back or spread to other places in the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Some tumors need growth factors, which are made by the body's white blood cells, to keep growing. Growth factor inhibitors, such as cetuximab may interfere with the growth factor and stop the tumor from growing.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Study of Pembrolizumab and Concurrent Radiation in Patients With Previously Treated Carcinoma of Unknown Primary

    Single-arm phase 2 study to examine pembrolizumab and concurrent radiation to induce an abscopal effect in patients with previously treated carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP16-268)
    Location: 2 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced HPV Positive Oropharynx Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy followed by reduced dose chemoradiation therapy works in curing patients with locally advanced human papillomavirus (HPV) positive oropharynx cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, cisplatin, fluorouracil and carboplatin work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving combination chemotherapy prior to chemoradiation therapy may result in be less early and late toxicity and side effects then standard chemoradiotherapy in HPV positive oropharynx cancer as there will be fewer side effects.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Validation of Smartphone App for Head and Neck Cancer Control and Patient Support

    Vibrent Health is partnering with Stanford Cancer Center to conduct a randomized control trial (RCT) using mobile health technology to enhance adherence and improve swallowing outcomes in patients undergoing radiation therapy for head and neck cancer.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Safety and Efficacy of Repeat Administration of Ad / PNP and Fludarabine Phosphate in Patients With Local Head / Neck Cancer

    Primary Objective: The primary objective of the study is to evaluate the safety of repeat administration of a dose level of Ad / PNP plus fludarabine phosphate (F-araAMP) which demonstrated anti-tumor activity in patients with advanced, locoregional head / neck cancer in a completed phase I study. Secondary Objective: The secondary objective is to evaluate the antitumor activity of repeat administration of Ad / PNP plus F-araAMP.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Durvalumab with or without Metformin in Treating Participants with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    This pilot phase I trial studies how well durvalumab given with or without metformin works in treating participants with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Metformin, a drug typically used for the treatment of diabetes, may help to reduce the metabolic activity of cancer cells and of surrounding supportive tissues. It is not yet known whether giving durvalumab with or without metformin may work better in treating participants with head and neck squamous carcinoma.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Pembrolizumab, Cisplatin, and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Previously Untreated Stage III-IVb Head and Neck Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab works when given during or after cisplatin and intensity modulated radiation therapy in treating patients with previously untreated stage III-IVb head and neck cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. It is not yet known whether giving pembrolizumab during or after cisplatin and intensity modulated radiation therapy will kill more tumor cells.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Rare Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or are Metastatic

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab works in treating patients with rare tumors that cannot be removed by surgery or have spread to other parts of the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may block specific proteins found on white blood cells which may strengthen the immune system and control tumor growth.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Mitomycin in Treating Patients with P16 Positive Oropharyngeal or P16 Negative Head and Neck Cancer That is Resistant to Platin, Fluorouracil, Cetuximab, and Taxane

    This phase II trial studies how well mitomycin works in treating patients with tumor protein (p)16 positive oropharyngeal or p16 negative head and neck squamous cell cancer that is resistant to platin, fluorouracil, cetuximab, and taxane. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Talimogene Laherparepvec and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Refractory Lymphomas or Advanced or Refractory Non-melanoma Skin Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well talimogene laherparepvec works and nivolumab in treating patients with lymphomas that do not responded to treatment or non-melanoma skin cancers that have spread to other places in the body or do not responded to treatment. Biological therapies, such as talimogene laherparepvec, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving talimogene laherparepvec and nivolumab may work better in treating patients with lymphomas or non-melanoma skin cancers.
    Location: 19 locations