Clinical Trials Using CD19CAR-CD3zeta-4-1BB-expressing Autologous T-lymphocytes

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying CD19CAR-CD3zeta-4-1BB-expressing Autologous T-lymphocytes. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-8 of 8
  • Study of Efficacy and Safety of CTL019 in Pediatric ALL Patients

    This is a single arm, open-label, multi-center, phase II study to determine the efficacy and safety of an experimental therapy called CTL019 T-cells in pediatric patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who are refractory to standard chemotherapy regimen or relapsed after allogeneic stem cell transplant
    Location: 9 locations

  • Study of Efficacy and Safety of CTL019 in Adult DLBCL Patients

    This is a multi-center, phase II study to determine the efficacy and safety of CTL019 in adult patients with relapsed or refractory DLBCL.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Determine Efficacy and Safety of CTL019 in Pediatric Patients With Relapsed and Refractory B-cell ALL

    This is a single arm, open-label, multi-center, phase II study to determine the efficacy and safety of CTL019 in pediatric patients with r / r B-cell ALL.
    Location: 4 locations

  • CART-19 T Cells after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well anti-cluster of differentiation (CD)19 chimeric antigen receptor (CART-19)T cells work in treating patients with high-risk multiple myeloma after a stem cell transplant. White blood cells called T cells are taken from the patient and are modified or genetically changed. These cells are called CART-19 T cells and are designed to identify and kill a type of white blood cell called a B cell. B cells may help multiple myeloma cells grow. By eliminating B cells, CART-19 T cells may help control multiple myeloma in patents after a stem cell transplant.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Laboratory Treated T-Cells in Treating Patients with Recurrent CD19+ Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma Receiving Ibrutinib

    This pilot clinical trial studies the side effects and best dose of laboratory treated T-cells in treating patients with cluster of differentiation (CD)19+ chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma that has come back receiving ibrutinib. White blood cells (called T cells) are taken from the patient and modified so that they can identify and possibly kill the cancerous cells. The modification is a genetic change, or gene transfer, to the normal T-cells. These modified cells are called (CART-19) T-cells which are then given back to the patient and this may be a better treatment in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • CD19-Specific T-cells in Treating Patients with Advanced Lymphoid Malignancies

    This phase I clinical trial studies the side effects and best dose of cluster of differentiation (CD)19-specific T-cells in treating patients with lymphoid malignancies that have spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Sometimes researchers change the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (genetic material in cells) of donated T-cells (white blood cells that support the immune system) using a process called "gene transfer." Gene transfer involves drawing blood from the patient, and then separating out the T-cells using a machine. Researchers then perform a gene transfer to change the T-cells' DNA, and then inject the changed T-cells into the body of the patient. Injecting modified T-cells made from the patient may help attack cancer cells in patients with advanced B-cell lymphoma or leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • CART-19 Cells in Treating Patients With Chemotherapy Relapsed or Refractory B Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well CD19CAR-CD3zeta-4-1BB-expressing autologous T-lymphocytes (CART-19 cells) work in treating patients with chemotherapy recurrent or refractory B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. This type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma involves a kind of white cell (or lymphocyte) called the B-cell. T-cells are modified through gene transfer using a type of virus called a lentiviral vector to deliver the genetic material called CART-19 into a patient's T-cells. These modified cells are called CART-19 T-cells. The CART-19 T-cells will be able to identify and possibly kill cancerous B-cells and may help the body build an effective immune response to kill cancer cells.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Genetically Modified T-Cells in Treating Patients With Advanced Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of genetically modified T-cells in treating patients with advanced non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Biological therapies, such as genetically modified T-cells may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing.
    Location: Baylor College of Medicine / Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Houston, Texas