Clinical Trials Using Etoposide Phosphate

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Etoposide Phosphate. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-16 of 16
  • Paclitaxel and Carboplatin or Bleomycin Sulfate, Etoposide Phosphate, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients with Advanced or Recurrent Sex Cord-Ovarian Stromal Tumors

    This randomized phase II trial studies paclitaxel and carboplatin to see how well they work compared with bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin in treating patients with sex cord-ovarian stromal tumors that have spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced) or has returned (recurrent). Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. It is not yet known which chemotherapy regimen is more effective in treating sex cord-ovarian stromal tumors.
    Location: 192 locations

  • Safety Study of AG-120 or AG-221 in Combination With Induction and Consolidation Therapy in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia With an IDH1 and / or IDH2 Mutation

    The purpose of this Phase I, multicenter, clinical trial is to evaluate the safety of AG-120 and AG-221 when given in combination with standard AML induction and consolidation therapy. The study plans to evaluate 1 dose level of AG-120 in subjects with an IDH1 mutation and 1 dose level of AG-221 in subjects with an IDH2 mutation. AG-120 or AG-221 will be administered with 2 types of AML induction therapies (cytarabine with either daunorubicin or idarubicin) and 2 types of AML consolidation therapies (mitoxantrone with etoposide [ME] or cytarabine). After consolidation therapy, subjects may continue on to maintenance therapy and receive daily treatment of AG-120 or AG-221 for up to 2 years from Day 1 of the first induction cycle, or until relapse, development of an unacceptable toxicity, or hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT).
    Location: 13 locations

  • Phase 3 Randomized, Open-Label Study of Guadecitabine vs Treatment Choice in Previously Treated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group study of guadecitabine vs treatment choice (TC). Subjects will be randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either guadecitabine or TC. TC options include the 8 high or low intensity, locally available regimens below; or Best supportive Care (BSC) alone: - High intensity (intermediate or high dose cytarabine [HiDAC]; mitoxantrone, etoposide, and cytarabine [MEC]; or fludarabine, cytarabine, granulocyte colony stimulating factor [G-CSF], + / - idarubicin [FLAG / FLAG-Ida]). - Low intensity (low dose cytarabine [LDAC], decitabine, or azacitidine). - BSC.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Irinotecan Hydrochloride, Temozolomide, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Ewing Sarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well irinotecan hydrochloride, temozolomide, and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed Ewing sarcoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan hydrochloride, temozolomide, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, ifosfamide, and etoposide phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, or by stopping them from dividing.
    Location: 6 locations

  • A Trial of Temsirolimus With Etoposide and Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma

    This is a phase I study of temsirolimus (Torisel) combined with dexamethasone, cyclophosphamide and etoposide in patients with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL) or peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTL).
    Location: 5 locations

  • Azacitidine or Decitabine in Epigenetic Priming in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well azacitidine or decitabine work in epigenetic priming in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. Azacitidine and decitabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Treatment for Advanced B-Cell Lymphoma

    To safely reduce the burden of therapy in children, adolescents and young adults with mature B-NHL by reducing the number of intrathecal (IT) injections by the introduction of IT Liposomal Cytarabine (L-ARA-C, [Depocyt®]) and reducing the dose of anthracycline (doxorubicin) in good risk patients with the addition of rituximab to the FAB chemotherapy backbone (Immunochemotherapy).
    Location: 2 locations

  • Lenalidomide, Combination Chemotherapy, and Rituximab in Treating Patients with Primary Effusion Lymphoma or KSHV-Associated Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of lenalidomide when given together with combination chemotherapy and rituximab in treating patients with primary effusion lymphoma or Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Biological therapies, such as lenalidomide, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide phosphate, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving lenalidomide, combination chemotherapy, and rituximab together may work better in treating patients with primary effusion lymphoma or KSHV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Pilot Study of Crenolanib Combined With Standard Salvage Chemotherapy in Subjects With R / R AML

    The proposed study is designed to combine crenolanib with standard salvage chemotherapy to treat patients with R / R AML irrespective the FLT3 status.
    Location: UT Southwestern / Simmons Cancer Center-Dallas, Dallas, Texas

  • Donor Natural Killer Cell Infusion after Autologous CD133+ Selected Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with High Risk Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    This pilot clinical trial studies whether a donor natural killer cell infusion can be safely used after autologous cluster of differentiation (CD)133+ selected stem cell transplant in treating younger patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that are likely to come back or spread. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. An autologous transplant means that stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Stem cell selection is used to separate stem cells from other cells collected, which may include tumor cells. A natural killer cell is a type of white blood cell that has small particles with enzymes that can kill tumor cells. Adding a haploidentical donor (partially matched family member donor) natural killer cell infusion after an autologous stem cell transplant may help treat younger patients with high risk solid tumors or lymphomas.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • High-Dose Chemotherapy, Bevacizumab, and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Recurrent Germ Cell Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well high-dose chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and stem cell transplant work in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have come back. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of tumor cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Also, monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, can find cancer cells and either kill them or deliver cancer-killing substances to them without harming normal cells. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. More chemotherapy is given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Carboplatin, Melphalan, Etoposide Phosphate, Mannitol, and Sodium Thiosulfate in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Brain Tumors

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of melphalan when given together with carboplatin, etoposide phosphate, mannitol, and sodium thiosulfate and to see how well they work in treating patients with previously treated brain tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as melphalan, carboplatin, and etoposide phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) uses mannitol to open the blood vessels around the brain and allow cancer-killing substances to be carried directly to the brain. Sodium thiosulfate may help lessen or prevent hearing loss and toxicities in patients undergoing chemotherapy with carboplatin and BBBD. Giving carboplatin, melphalan, etoposide phosphate, mannitol, and sodium thiosulfate together may be an effective treatment for brain tumors.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Adult T-Cell Leukemia / Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well brentuximab vedotin and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with adult T-cell leukemia / lymphoma. Brentuximab vedotin is an antibody that also has a chemotherapy drug attached to it. Antibodies are proteins that are part of the immune system. They can stick to and attack specific targets on cancer cells. The antibody part of brentuximab vedotin sticks to a target called CD30 that is located on the outside of the cancer cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, etoposide phosphate, and prednisone work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving brentuximab vedotin and combination chemotherapy together may work better in treating patients with adult T-cell leukemia / lymphoma.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • Accelerated or Standard BEP Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Intermediate or Poor-Risk Metastatic Germ Cell Tumors

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well an accelerated schedule of bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin (BEP) chemotherapy works compared to the standard schedule of BEP chemotherapy in treating patients with intermediate or poor-risk germ cell tumors that have spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving BEP chemotherapy on a faster, or “accelerated” schedule may work better with fewer side effects in treating patients with intermediate or poor-risk metastatic germ cell tumors.
    Location: Childrens Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Iobenguane I-131 or Crizotinib and Standard Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Newly-Diagnosed High-Risk Neuroblastoma or Ganglioneuroblastoma

    This partially randomized phase III trial studies iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy in treating younger patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma. Radioactive drugs, such as iobenguane I-131, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Crizotinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy may work better in treating younger patients with neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma.
    Location: Childrens Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Combination Chemotherapy with or without Sodium Thiosulfate in Preventing Low Platelet Count While Treating Patients with Malignant Brain Tumors

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well giving combination chemotherapy with or without sodium thiosulfate works in preventing low platelet count while treating patients with malignant brain tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Sodium thiosulfate may prevent low platelet counts in patients receiving chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without sodium thiosulfate in preventing low platelet count during treatment for brain tumors.
    Location: 2 locations