Clinical Trials Using Fludarabine Phosphate

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Fludarabine Phosphate. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 153
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  • Liposomal Cytarabine-Daunorubicin CPX-351, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of liposomal cytarabine-daunorubicin CPX-351 (CPX-351) when given with fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, and filgrastim and to see how well they work in treating younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back after treatment (relapsed) or is not responding to treatment (is refractory). Liposomal cytarabine-daunorubicin CPX-351 is made up of two chemotherapy drugs, cytarabine and daunorubicin hydrochloride, and works to stop cancer cell growth by blocking the cells from dividing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Filgrastim may increase the production of blood cells and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. Giving liposomal cytarabine-daunorubicin CPX-351 followed by fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, and filgrastim may be a better treatment for patients with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia and may cause fewer side effects to the heart, a common effect of other chemotherapy treatments for acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: 52 locations

  • Ruxolitinib Phosphate Before Reduced Intensity Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Myelofibrosis

    This phase II trial studies how well adding ruxolitinib phosphate before a reduced intensity donor stem cell transplant works in treating patients with myelofibrosis. Ruxolitinib phosphate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving ruxolitinib phosphate and chemotherapy before a donor stem cell may help stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: 11 locations

  • A Study of ASP2215 Versus Salvage Chemotherapy in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) With FMS-like Tyrosine Kinase (FLT3) Mutation

    The purpose of this study is to determine the clinical benefit of ASP2215 therapy in patients with FMS-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3) mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are refractory to or have relapsed after first-line AML therapy as shown with overall survival (OS) compared to salvage chemotherapy, and to determine the efficacy of ASP2215 therapy as assessed by the rate of complete remission and complete remission with partial hematological recovery (CR / CRh) in these patients. This study will also determine the overall efficacy in event-free survival (EFS) and complete remission (CR) rate of ASP2215 compared to salvage chemotherapy.
    Location: 25 locations

  • Double Cord Versus Haploidentical (BMT CTN 1101)

    Hematopoietic cell transplants (HCT)are one treatment option for people with leukemia or lymphoma. Family members,unrelated donors or banked umbilical cordblood units with similar tissue type can be used for HCT. This study will compare the effectiveness of two new types of bone marrow transplants in people with leukemia or lymphoma: one that uses bone marrow donated from family members with only partially matched bone marrow; and, one that uses two partially matched cord blood units.
    Location: 22 locations

  • Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation With Ixazomib for High Risk Multiple Myeloma (BMT CTN 1302)

    This study is designed to compare progression-free survival (PFS) from randomization among patients randomized on the BMT CTN 1302 protocol, "Multicenter Phase II, Double-blind Placebo Controlled Trial of Maintenance Ixazomib after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for High Risk Multiple Myeloma". It is hypothesized that Ixazomib maintenance therapy will result in improved PFS in patients with high-risk multiple myeloma following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) compared to placebo.
    Location: 14 locations

  • A Study Evaluating KTE-C19 in Adult Subjects With Relapsed / Refractory B-precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (r / r ALL) (ZUMA-3)

    This is a single arm, open-label, multi-center, phase 1 / 2 study, to determine the safety and efficacy of KTE-C19, an autologous anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-positive T cell therapy, in relapsed / refractory B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
    Location: 13 locations

  • A Phase 2 Multicenter Study Evaluating Subjects With Relapsed / Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    Study KTE-C19-102 is a phase 2, multicenter, open-label study evaluating the efficacy of KTE-C19 in subjects with Relapsed / Refractory MCL
    Location: 13 locations

  • Ibrutinib and Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, and Rituximab in Treating Patients with Previously Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well ibrutinib when given together with fludarabine phosphate, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab works in treating patients with previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Giving ibrutinib together with fludarabine phosphate, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant with or without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well donor umbilical cord blood transplant with or without ex-vivo expanded cord blood progenitor cells works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, or myelodysplastic syndromes. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's cells. When the healthy stem cells and ex-vivo expanded cord blood progenitor cells are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. It is not yet known whether giving donor umbilical cord blood transplant plus ex-vivo expanded cord blood progenitor cells is more effective than giving a donor umbilical cord blood transplant alone.
    Location: 9 locations

  • A Phase 2 Multicenter Study of Axicabtagene Ciloleucel in Subjects With Relapsed / Refractory Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This study will enroll approximately 50 adult subjects who have relapsed or refractory (r / r) iNHL to be infused with the study treatment, axicabtagene ciloleucel, to see if their disease responds to this experimental product and if this product is safe. Axicabtagene ciloleucel is made from the subjects own white blood cells which are genetically modified and grown to fight cancer. An objective response rate of 70% is targeted.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Phase 3 Randomized, Open-Label Study of Guadecitabine vs Treatment Choice in Previously Treated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group study of guadecitabine vs treatment choice (TC). Subjects will be randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either guadecitabine or TC. TC options include the 8 high or low intensity, locally available regimens below; or Best supportive Care (BSC) alone: - High intensity (intermediate or high dose cytarabine [HiDAC]; mitoxantrone, etoposide, and cytarabine [MEC]; or fludarabine, cytarabine, granulocyte colony stimulating factor [G-CSF], + / - idarubicin [FLAG / FLAG-Ida]). - Low intensity (low dose cytarabine [LDAC], decitabine, or azacitidine). - BSC.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Dasatinib in Combination with Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Core Binding Factor Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of dasatinib when given together with combination chemotherapy in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has a genetic mutation (core binding factor), and has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or has not responded to previous treatment (refractory). Dasatinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, and idarubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving dasatinib together with combination chemotherapy may be a better treatment for core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Panobinostat, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Cytarabine in Treating Younger Patients with Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of panobinostat when given together with fludarabine phosphate and cytarabine in treating younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that has not responded to previous treatment (refractory) or has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed). Panobinostat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving panobinostat together with fludarabine phosphate and cytarabine may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 7 locations

  • A Phase 1-2 Multi-Center Study Evaluating KTE-C19 in Subjects With Refractory Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (ZUMA-1)

    This is a single arm, open-label, multi-center, phase 1 / 2 study, to determine the safety and efficacy of KTE-C19, an autologous anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-positive T cell therapy, in refractory aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL).
    Location: 10 locations

  • Selinexor, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Cytarabine in Treating Younger Patients with Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    This pilot phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of selinexor when given together with fludarabine phosphate and cytarabine in treating younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or myelodysplastic syndromes that did not go into remission after treatment (refractory) or has come back after treatment (relapsed). One way cancer cells continue to grow by escaping from mechanisms that normally control human cell growth, such as a type of protein called a tumor suppressor protein. Tumor suppressor proteins normally cause cancer cells to die. Selinexor works by trapping tumor suppressor proteins within the cancer cells, causing them to stop growing or die. Fludarabine phosphate and cytarabine are drugs used in chemotherapy that stop cancer cells from dividing. Giving selinexor with fludarabine phosphate and cytarabine may work better in treating acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or myelodysplastic syndromes in younger patients.
    Location: 6 locations

  • A Safety Study of Human Cord Blood Derived, Culture Expanded Natural Killer Cell (PNK-007) Infusion With Subcutaneous Recombinant Human IL-2 (rhIL-2) in Adults With Relapsed and / or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

    This study will find the highest acceptable treatment dose of cord blood, culture expanded natural killer (NK) cells, a kind of immune cell, in patients with relapsed and / or refractory acute myeloid leukemia. The NK cells will be given with chemotherapy and Recombinant human interleukin 2 (rhIL-2) to help the NK cells expand in the body. The safety of this treatment will be studied and researchers want to learn if NK cells will help in treating the AML.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Vaccine Therapy after Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well vaccine therapy after donor stem cell transplant works in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Vaccines made from a gene-modified virus and a person's tumor cells may help the body build an immune response to kill cancer cells. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood or bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient’s immune system from rejecting the donor’s stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient’s bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. It is not yet known whether giving vaccine therapy after a donor peripheral blood or bone marrow transplant is more effective than transplant alone in treating myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Sirolimus, Cyclosporine, and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing Graft-versus-Host Disease in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well sirolimus, cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil works in preventing graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) in patients with blood cancer undergoing donor peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplant. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving total-body irradiation together with sirolimus, cyclosporine, and mycophenolate mofetil before and after transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Azacitidine or Decitabine in Epigenetic Priming in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well azacitidine or decitabine work in epigenetic priming in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. Azacitidine and decitabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Donor Bone Marrow Transplant Followed by Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Severe Aplastic Anemia or Other Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

    This phase II trial studies donor bone marrow transplant followed by chemotherapy in treating patients with severe aplastic anemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory), or other bone marrow failure syndromes. Infusing stem cells from a donor into a patient may help the patient’s bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Currently, treatment to suppress the immune system is given before transplant to stop graft-versus-host disease from happening. Giving treatment to suppress the immune system after the transplant may work better in stopping graft-versus-host disease, and may help increase the number of donors for a patient by allowing people with stem cells that do not exactly match the patient to be donors. Giving treatment to suppress the immune system after the transplant may work better in stopping graft-versus-host disease, and may increase the amount of possible donors for a patient by better preventing graft-versus-host disease.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Treosulfan and Fludarabine Phosphate before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Nonmalignant Inherited Disorders

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well treosulfan and fludarabine phosphate with or without low dose radiation before donor stem cell transplantation works in treating patients with nonmalignant (noncancerous) diseases. Hematopoietic cell transplantation has been shown to be curative for many patients with nonmalignant (noncancerous) diseases such as primary immunodeficiency disorders, bone marrow failure syndromes, hemoglobinopathies, and inborn errors of metabolism (metabolic disorders). Powerful chemotherapy drugs and / or radiation are often used to condition the patient before infusion of the new healthy donor cells. The purpose of the conditioning therapy is to destroy the patient's abnormal bone marrow which doesn't work properly in order to make way for the new healthy donor cells which functions normally. Although effective in curing the patient's disease, many hematopoietic cell transplantation regimens use intensive chemotherapy and / or radiation which can be quite toxic, have significant side effects, and can potentially be life-threatening. Investigators are investigating whether a new conditioning regimen that uses less intensive drugs (treosulfan and fludarabine phosphate) with or without low dose radiation results in new blood-forming cells (engraftment) of the new donor cells without increased toxicities in patients with nonmalignant (noncancerous) diseases.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide, Mycophenolate Mofetil, Tacrolimus, and Sirolimus in Treating Patients with Primary Immunodeficiency Disorders or Noncancerous Inherited Disorders

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of fludarabine phosphate, cyclophosphamide and total-body irradiation followed by donor bone marrow transplant and cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and sirolimus in treating patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders or noncancerous inherited disorders. Giving low doses of chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a bone marrow transplant helps prepare the patient’s body to accept the incoming donor’s bone marrow and decrease the risk that the patient's immune system will reject the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells called graft versus host disease. Giving cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and sirolimus after the transplant may help decrease this from happening.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Bone Marrow Transplantation vs Standard of Care in Patients With Severe Sickle Cell Disease (BMT CTN 1503)

    This is a clinical trial that will compare survival and sickle related outcomes in adolescents and young adults with severe sickle cell disease after bone marrow transplantation and standard of care. The primary outcome is 2-year overall survival.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Haploidentical Donor Stem Cell Transplant plus Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well a partially matched (haploidentical) donor stem cell transplant and umbilical cord blood transplant works compared to a matched unrelated (not a sibling or family member) stem cell donor in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that is likely to recur (come back), or spread (high-risk). When matched family members cannot be identified, doctors use the stem cells of other healthy volunteers whose blood type matches the patients' blood. Another transplant procedure uses stem cells from umbilical cord blood (UCB) from the placenta of newborn baby. Chemotherapy and total-body irradiation are given before transplant to help stop the growth of cancer cells in the bone marrow and weaken the immune system so that the transplant cells can grow. It may take time to find a donor who is not a family member but matches the patient's blood type. Giving an umbilical cord blood transplant with a partially matched stem cell transplant may be as effective as a matched stem cell transplant in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Laboratory Treated T-cells in Treating Younger Patients with Recurrent or Refractory CD22-Expressing B-cell Malignancies

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of laboratory treated T cells in treating younger patients with cluster of differentiation (CD)22-expressing B cell malignancies that have come back or do not respond to treatment. Biological therapies, such as anti-CD22-chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) m971-BBz lentiviral vector-transduced autologous T lymphocytes, use substances made from living organisms that may attack specific cancer cells and stop them from growing or kill them.
    Location: 2 locations


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