Clinical Trials Using Filgrastim

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Filgrastim. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 62
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  • Gene Expression Profiling in Predicting Chemotherapy Response in Patients with Localized, Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well looking at genes using a type of gene expression profiling called COXEN (co-expression extrapolation) works in predicting response to chemotherapy in patients with bladder cancer that has spread to the muscle of the bladder. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, vinblastine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim and pegfilgrastim may increase the production of blood cells and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. Gene expression profiling measures genetic information in various types of cells. Studying genes that affect how well patients respond to treatment may help doctors learn whether genetic information can be used in predicting treatment response and may help doctors plan the best treatment.
    Location: 578 locations

  • Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Young Patients with Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated, High-Risk Medulloblastoma

    This randomized phase III trial studies different chemotherapy and radiation therapy regimens to compare how well they work in treating young patients with newly diagnosed, previously untreated, high-risk medulloblastoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Carboplatin may make tumor cells more sensitive to radiation therapy. It is not yet known which chemotherapy and radiation therapy regimen is more effective in treating brain tumors.
    Location: 177 locations

  • Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 56 locations

  • Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well standard-dose combination chemotherapy works compared to high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have returned after a period of improvement or did not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Giving colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim or pegfilgrastim, and certain chemotherapy drugs, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant are more effective than standard-dose combination chemotherapy in treating patients with refractory or relapsed germ cell tumors.
    Location: 41 locations

  • Standard-Dose Lenalidomide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone or High-Dose Lenalidomide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    This randomized phase III trial studies standard-dose lenalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone (RVD) to see how well it works compared to high-dose RVD followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT) in treating patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Giving RVD before a PBSCT may help stop the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing, killing them, blocking the enzymes needed for cell growth, or stimulating the immune system. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient’s blood and stored. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by RVD combination therapy. It is not yet known whether standard-dose RVD is more effective than high-dose RVD followed by PBSCT in treating MM.
    Location: 51 locations

  • Liposomal Cytarabine-Daunorubicin CPX-351, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of liposomal cytarabine-daunorubicin CPX-351 (CPX-351) when given with fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, and filgrastim and to see how well they work in treating younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back after treatment (relapsed) or is not responding to treatment (is refractory). Liposomal cytarabine-daunorubicin CPX-351 is made up of two chemotherapy drugs, cytarabine and daunorubicin hydrochloride, and works to stop cancer cell growth by blocking the cells from dividing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Filgrastim may increase the production of blood cells and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. Giving liposomal cytarabine-daunorubicin CPX-351 followed by fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, and filgrastim may be a better treatment for patients with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia and may cause fewer side effects to the heart, a common effect of other chemotherapy treatments for acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: 52 locations

  • A Study of ASP2215 Versus Salvage Chemotherapy in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) With FMS-like Tyrosine Kinase (FLT3) Mutation

    The purpose of this study is to determine the clinical benefit of ASP2215 therapy in patients with FMS-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3) mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are refractory to or have relapsed after first-line AML therapy as shown with overall survival (OS) compared to salvage chemotherapy, and to determine the efficacy of ASP2215 therapy as assessed by the rate of complete remission and complete remission with partial hematological recovery (CR / CRh) in these patients. This study will also determine the overall efficacy in event-free survival (EFS) and complete remission (CR) rate of ASP2215 compared to salvage chemotherapy.
    Location: 25 locations

  • Scleroderma Treatment with Autologous Transplant (STAT) Study

    This phase II trial studies how well giving cyclophosphamide and anti-thymocyte globulin together followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT) and mycophenolate mofetil works in treating patients with systemic scleroderma (SSc). Stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored prior to treatment. To store the stem cells patients are given colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim (G-CSF) or chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide) to help stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. After storage, patients are then given high-dose chemotherapy, cyclophosphamide, and immunosuppression with anti-thymocyte globulin to suppress the immune system to prepare for the transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy and immunosuppression. After the stem cells have “engrafted” and have matured enough to support the immune system at approximately 2-3 months, patients are given a medication called mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or Myfortic. This medication is given to prevent worsening or reactivation of SSc and is referred to as maintenance therapy.
    Location: 14 locations

  • Alisertib Alone or in Combination with Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Recurrent, Progressive, or Newly Diagnosed Central Nervous System Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumors or Extra-Central Nervous System Malignant Rhabdoid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well alisertib alone or in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy works in treating younger patients with central nervous system (CNS) atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors that are newly diagnosed; have returned; or are growing, spreading, or getting worse or extra-CNS malignant rhabdoid tumors that have returned or are growing, spreading, or getting worse. Alisertib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking a protein called aurora kinase A that is needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses x-rays to kill tumor cells. Giving alisertib alone or with chemotherapy and radiation therapy may be effective in treating patients with rhabdoid tumors.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Risk Classification Schemes in Identifying Better Treatment Options for Children and Adolescents with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies risk classification schemes in identifying better treatment options for children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Risk factor classification may help identify how strong treatment should be for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Phase 3 Randomized, Open-Label Study of Guadecitabine vs Treatment Choice in Previously Treated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group study of guadecitabine vs treatment choice (TC). Subjects will be randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either guadecitabine or TC. TC options include the 8 high or low intensity, locally available regimens below; or Best supportive Care (BSC) alone: - High intensity (intermediate or high dose cytarabine [HiDAC]; mitoxantrone, etoposide, and cytarabine [MEC]; or fludarabine, cytarabine, granulocyte colony stimulating factor [G-CSF], + / - idarubicin [FLAG / FLAG-Ida]). - Low intensity (low dose cytarabine [LDAC], decitabine, or azacitidine). - BSC.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Risk-Adapted Therapy in Treating Young Patients with Mature B-Cell Lymphoma or Leukemia

    Many children and young adults with mature B-cell lymphoma can be cured with current standard treatments, but these standard treatments do not stop every child’s cancer from coming back. Furthermore, many children have significant side effects from treatment, both at the time of treatment and for many years after treatment is completed (late effects). That is why there is still much to be learned about this disease and its treatment. This study is being done to help researchers learn more about the biology and genetics of this disease in children in the United States (U.S.) and at several international sites and to study the effects (good and bad) of this treatment in St. Jude participants in order to help researchers guide treatment for children and young adults with this disease in the future.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Azacitidine or Decitabine in Epigenetic Priming in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well azacitidine or decitabine work in epigenetic priming in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. Azacitidine and decitabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Ixazomib Citrate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ixazomib citrate when given together with combination chemotherapy in treating older patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Ixazomib citrate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in combination chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ixazomib citrate with combination chemotherapy may work better in treating older patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • T Cell Receptor Gene Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Solid Tumors

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of T cell receptor gene therapy in treating younger patients with solid tumors. Placing a gene that has been created in the laboratory into white blood osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, neuroblastoma or melanoma cells may help the body build an immune response to kill tumor cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cyclophosphamide or Thalidomide after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with Solid Tumors

    This pilot clinical trial studies cyclophosphamide or thalidomide following high dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating younger patients with solid tumors. Drugs such as cyclophosphamide and thalidomide suppress the growth of new blood vessels to tumors. Blocking blood flow to tumors after receiving high dose chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant may prevent the tumors from coming back or continuing to grow.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

    The goal of this clinical research study is to learn the highest tolerable dose of gemcitabine (out of 4 possible doses) that can be given in combination with busulfan and clofarabine before an allogeneic stem cell transplant. Researchers also want to learn if this combination can help to control CLL. The safety of this treatment will also be studied. Busulfan is designed to bind to DNA (the genetic material of cells), which may cause cancer cells to die. It is commonly used in stem cell transplants. Clofarabine and gemcitabine are designed to block the growth of cancer cells, which may cause the cancer cells to die.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Eltrombopag Olamine and Filgrastim in Mobilizing Stem Cells in Patients with Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    This pilot clinical trial studies the best dose of eltrombopag olamine when given together with filgrastim in mobilizing stem cells in patients with multiple myeloma undergoing peripheral blood stem cell transplant. Eltrombopag olamine may increase production of platelets. Giving colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim helps stem cells move from the patient's bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Giving eltrombopag olamine together with filgrastim may improve the stem cell collection available for peripheral blood stem cell transplant in patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes, Aldesleukin, and Pembrolizumab after Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, aldesleukin, and pembrolizumab work after chemotherapy in treating patients with cancers that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Aldesleukin may stimulate lymphocytes to kill tumor cells. Treating lymphocytes with aldesleukin in the laboratory may help the lymphocytes kill more tumor cells when they are put back in the body after chemotherapy.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Ibrutinib, Rituximab, Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with HIV-Positive Stage II-IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas

    This phase I trial studies the side effect and best dose of ibrutinib in combination with rituximab, etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive stage II-IV diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ibrutinib and etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride may work better in treating patients with HIV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.
    Location: AIDS Malignancy Consortium, Rockville, Maryland

  • Combination Chemotherapy, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematopoietic Malignancies Including Those That Are Challenging to Engraft

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy, total body irradiation, and donor stem cell transplant work in treating patients with hematopoietic malignancies including those that are challenging to engraft. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving high-dose cyclophosphamide after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone, New York, New York

  • Melphalan, Total Marrow Irradiation, and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients with High-Risk Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of melphalan and total marrow irradiation and how well they work with autologous stem cell transplantation in treating patients with high-risk multiple myeloma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Total marrow irradiation is a type of radiation therapy and a form of total body irradiation that may deliver focused radiation to the major marrow sites where cancer cells reside. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a peripheral autologous blood stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. More chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Cyclophosphamide and Bendamustine after Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Preventing GVHD in Patients with Leukemia or Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of bendamustine when given together with cyclophosphamide after donor bone marrow transplant and to see how well they work in preventing graft versus host disease (GVHD) in patients with leukemia or lymphoma. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving bendamustine and cyclophosphamide after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: The University of Arizona Medical Center-University Campus, Tucson, Arizona

  • Reduced Intensity Conditioning and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well reduced intensity conditioning (a short course of chemotherapy) and stem cell transplant work in treating patients with blood cancer. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Giving reduced intensity conditioning and total body irradiation before a donor blood stem cell transplant helps to stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells with shorter recovery and fewer side effects.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Engineered Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of engineered donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Using T cells specially selected from donor blood in the laboratory for transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas


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