Clinical Trials Using Clofarabine

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Clofarabine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-16 of 16
  • Clofarabine in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis

    This phase II trial studies how well clofarabine works in treating patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as clofarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 14 locations

  • Risk-Directed Therapy in Treating Young Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well risk directed therapy works in treating younger patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has returned or does not responded to treatment. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells and natural killer cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

    The goal of this clinical research study is to learn the highest tolerable dose of gemcitabine (out of 4 possible doses) that can be given in combination with busulfan and clofarabine before an allogeneic stem cell transplant. Researchers also want to learn if this combination can help to control CLL. The safety of this treatment will also be studied. Busulfan is designed to bind to DNA (the genetic material of cells), which may cause cancer cells to die. It is commonly used in stem cell transplants. Clofarabine and gemcitabine are designed to block the growth of cancer cells, which may cause the cancer cells to die.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Clofarabine and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well clofarabine works when given together with low-dose total-body irradiation (TBI) in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT). Giving chemotherapy and TBI before a donor PBSCT helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient’s immune system from rejecting the donor’s stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient’s bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Personalized NK Cell Therapy after Chemotherapy and Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Leukemia, Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well personalized natural killer (NK) cell therapy works after chemotherapy and umbilical cord blood transplant in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, leukemia, lymphoma or multiple myeloma. This clinical trial will test cord blood (CB) selection for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-C1 / x recipients based on HLA-killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) typing, and adoptive therapy with CB-derived NK cells for HLA-C2 / C2 patients. Natural killer cells may kill tumor cells that remain in the body after chemotherapy treatment and lessen the risk of graft versus host disease after cord blood transplant.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Panobinostat, Bortezomib, and Vincristine Sulfate Liposome with Re-induction Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed or Refractory T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well panobinostat, bortezomib, and vincristine sulfate liposome and re-induction therapy (strong chemotherapy) work in treating younger patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoma that has returned (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Panobinostat and bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitoxantrone hydrochloride, pegaspargase, dexamethasone, cytarabine, vincristine sulfate liposome, methotrexate, mercaptopurine, nelarabine, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving panobinostat, bortezomib, and vincristine sulfate liposome together with re-induction therapy may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant and Combination Chemotherapy as Initial Salvage Therapy in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Refractory to High-Dose Cytarabine-Based Induction Chemotherapy

    This phase II trial studies the safety of a donor hematopoietic stem cell transplant and combination chemotherapy and to see how well they work as an initial treatment given after cancer has not responded to other treatments (salvage therapy) in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that did not respond to treatment (refractory) with high-dose cytarabine-based chemotherapy that was given as the first treatment (induction therapy). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as decitabine, clofarabine, idarubicin, cytarabine, busulfan, fludarabine phosphate, and anti-thymocyte globulin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more cancer cells. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood or bone marrow stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, cyclophosphamide, and methotrexate after the transplant may stop this from happening. Giving a donor hematopoietic stem cell transplant together with combination chemotherapy may be a better treatment for acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Clofarabine, Idarubicin, Cytarabine, Vincristine Sulfate, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well clofarabine, idarubicin, cytarabine, vincristine sulfate, and dexamethasone work in treating patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia that is newly diagnosed or has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as clofarabine, idarubicin, cytarabine, vincristine sulfate, and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Fludarabine Phosphate, Clofarabine, and Busulfan with Vorinostat in Treating Patients with Acute Leukemia in Remission or Relapse Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of vorinostat when given together with fludarabine phosphate, clofarabine, and busulfan in treating patients with acute leukemia that is under control (remission) or has returned (relapse) undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Vorinostat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate, clofarabine, and busulfan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving vorinostat together with fludarabine phosphate, clofarabine, and busulfan before a donor stem cell transplant may be a better treatment for patients with acute leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Partially-Matched Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This pilot clinical trial studies partially-matched donor stem cell transplant in treating younger patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies. Giving chemotherapy and / or total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Lurie Children's Hospital-Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

  • Clofarabine and Melphalan before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Myelodysplasia, Acute Leukemia in Remission, or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well clofarabine and melphalan before a donor stem cell transplant work in treating patients with a decrease in or disappearance of signs and symptoms of myelodysplasia, acute leukemia (disease is in remission), or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Giving chemotherapy, such as clofarabine and melphalan, before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into a patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Giving clofarabine and melphalan before transplant may help prevent the cancer from coming back after transplant, and they may cause fewer side effects than standard treatment.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, Clofarabine, and Busulfan before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Refractory B-Cell or T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of gemcitabine hydrochloride, clofarabine, and busulfan before donor stem cell transplant and to see how well it works in treating patients with B-cell or T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma or Hodgkin lymphoma that does not respond to treatment. Giving chemotherapy before a donor bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Disease-Specific High-Dose Conditioning Regimens in Treating Patients Undergoing T-cell Depleted Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancies or Other Lethal Hematologic Disorders

    This phase II trial studies how well disease-specific high-dose conditioning regimens work in treating patients undergoing T-cell depleted peripheral blood stem cell transplant for hematologic malignancies or other lethal hematologic disorders. Giving high doses of chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving antithymocyte globulin and removing the T-cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Bortezomib and Clofarabine in Treating Patients with Refractory Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the safety and best dose of bortezomib and clofarabine in treating patients with solid tumors that did not respond to treatment. Bortezomib and clofarabine may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Clofarabine or Daunorubicin Hydrochloride and Cytarabine Followed By Decitabine or Observation in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies clofarabine to see how well it works compared with daunorubicin hydrochloride and cytarabine when followed by decitabine or observation in treating older patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as clofarabine, daunorubicin hydrochloride, cytarabine, and decitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more cancer cells. It is not yet known which chemotherapy regimen is more effective in treating acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: 402 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients with Newly Diagnosed High-Risk B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Ph-Like TKI Sensitive Mutations

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy works in treating young patients with newly diagnosed B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that is likely to come back or spread, and in patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-like tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) sensitive mutations. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) and giving the drugs in different doses and in different combinations may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 208 locations