Clinical Trials Using Vincristine Sulfate Liposome

  • Resize font
  • Print
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Vincristine Sulfate Liposome. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-5 of 5
  • Maintenance Chemotherapy or Observation Following Induction Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Ependymoma

    This partially randomized phase III trial is studying maintenance chemotherapy to see how well it works compared to observation following induction chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating young patients with newly diagnosed ependymoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells and allow doctors to save the part of the body where the cancer started.
    Location: 178 locations

  • Vincristine Sulfate Liposome Injection (Marqibo®) in Combination With UK ALL R3 Induction Chemotherapy for Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults With Relapsed ALL

    This is a pilot study utilizing Marqibo® (vincristine sulfate liposome injection) combined with dexamethasone, mitoxantrone and asparaginase (UK ALL R3) for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
    Location: 7 locations

  • Panobinostat, Bortezomib, and Vincristine Sulfate Liposome with Re-induction Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed or Refractory T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well panobinostat, bortezomib, and vincristine sulfate liposome and re-induction therapy (strong chemotherapy) work in treating younger patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoma that has returned (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Panobinostat and bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitoxantrone hydrochloride, pegaspargase, dexamethasone, cytarabine, vincristine sulfate liposome, methotrexate, mercaptopurine, nelarabine, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving panobinostat, bortezomib, and vincristine sulfate liposome together with re-induction therapy may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Vincristine Sulfate Liposome in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well vincristine sulfate liposome works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate liposome, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Liposomal encapsulation prolongs bioavailability (proportion of drug that enters the circulation when introduced into the body) of vincristine sulfate, and may increase its delivery to cancer cells with fewer side effects.
    Location: Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

  • Combination Chemotherapy with or without Rituximab, Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Ruxolitinib in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy with or without rituximab, imatinib mesylate, dasatinib, or ruxolitinib works in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Imatinib mesylate, dasatinib, and ruxolitinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving combination chemotherapy together with rituximab, imatinib mesylate, dasatinib, or ruxolitinib may be an effective treatment for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas