Clinical Trials Using Melphalan

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Melphalan. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 68
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  • Ibrutinib before and after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    This randomized phase III trial studies ibrutinib to see how well it works compared to placebo when given before and after stem cell transplant in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Before transplant, stem cells are taken from patients and stored. Patients then receive high doses of chemotherapy to kill cancer cells and make room for healthy cells. After treatment, the stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Ibrutinib is a drug that may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking a protein that is needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether adding ibrutinib to chemotherapy before and after stem cell transplant may help the transplant work better in patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: 243 locations

  • Standard-Dose Lenalidomide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone or High-Dose Lenalidomide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    This randomized phase III trial studies standard-dose lenalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone (RVD) to see how well it works compared to high-dose RVD followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT) in treating patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Giving RVD before a PBSCT may help stop the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing, killing them, blocking the enzymes needed for cell growth, or stimulating the immune system. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient’s blood and stored. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by RVD combination therapy. It is not yet known whether standard-dose RVD is more effective than high-dose RVD followed by PBSCT in treating MM.
    Location: 51 locations

  • Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation With Ixazomib for High Risk Multiple Myeloma (BMT CTN 1302)

    This study is designed to compare progression-free survival (PFS) from randomization among patients randomized on the BMT CTN 1302 protocol, "Multicenter Phase II, Double-blind Placebo Controlled Trial of Maintenance Ixazomib after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for High Risk Multiple Myeloma". It is hypothesized that Ixazomib maintenance therapy will result in improved PFS in patients with high-risk multiple myeloma following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) compared to placebo.
    Location: 14 locations

  • Dendritic Cell / Myeloma Fusion Vaccine for Multiple Myeloma (BMT CTN 1401)

    The study is designed as a Phase II, multicenter trial of vaccination with Dendritic cell / myeloma fusions with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) adjuvant plus lenalidomide maintenance therapy versus maintenance therapy alone or with GM-CSF following autologous transplant as part of upfront treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). It is hypothesized that the dendritic cell myeloma vaccine will result in improved response in patients with multiple myeloma after autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplant (HCT).
    Location: 14 locations

  • Chemotherapy, Stem Cell Transplant, and Romidepsin in Treating Patients with T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy, stem cell transplant, and romidepsin work in treating patients with T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. The patient’s stem cells that were previously collected are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as romidepsin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving romidepsin following stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Study of Dexamethasone Plus IXAZOMIB (MLN9708) or Physicians Choice of Treatment in Relapsed or Refractory Systemic Light Chain (AL) Amyloidosis

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether dexamethasone plus IXAZOMIB improves hematologic response, 2-year vital organ (that is, heart or kidney) deterioration and mortality rate versus a physician's choice of a chemotherapy regimen in participants diagnosed with relapsed or refractory systemic light chain (AL) amyloidosis.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Percutaneous Hepatic Perfusion vs Best Alternative Care in Patients With Hepatic-dominant Ocular Melanoma

    This study will evaluate two groups of patients who have melanoma that has spread from the eye to the liver: one group (50%) will get high-dose chemotherapy delivered specifically to the liver, while the other group (50%) will get one of 4 standard best alternative care treatments. Patients in each group will get repeating cycles of treatment until the cancer in the liver advances and will be followed until death. This study will evaluate the effect of the treatments on how long patients live and how long it takes for the cancer to advance or respond to the treatment.
    Location: 9 locations

  • A Study of JNJ-54767414 (HuMax CD38) (Anti-CD38 Monoclonal Antibody) in Combination With Backbone Treatments for the Treatment of Patients With Multiple Myeloma

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and dose regimen of daratumumab when administered in combination with various treatment regimens for the treatment of multiple myeloma.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Monoclonal Antibody Therapy and Vaccine Therapy after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well monoclonal antibody therapy and vaccine therapy after stem cell transplant work in treating patients with multiple myeloma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pidilizumab, can block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Vaccines made from a person's white blood cells mixed with tumor proteins may help the body build an effective immune response to kill cancer cells. It is not yet known whether giving monoclonal antibody therapy with or without vaccine therapy after stem cell transplant works better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Tadalafil and Lenalidomide with or without Activated Marrow Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Treating Patients with High-Risk Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well tadalafil and lenalidomide with or without activated marrow infiltrating lymphocytes work in treating patients with multiple myeloma undergoing stem cell transplant. Activated marrow infiltrating lymphocytes are blood and bone marrow cells that are stimulated to react to certain proteins and may help to target and kill cancer cells. Tadalafil may increase the possibility of trafficking activated marrow infiltrating lymphocytes to the cancer site. Lenalidomide may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. It is not yet known whether giving tadalafil and lenalidomide is more effective with or without activated marrow infiltrating lymphocytes in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Carmustine, Etoposide, Cytarabine, Melphalan, and Antithymocyte Globulin Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Autoimmune Neurologic Disease That Did Not Respond to Previous Therapy

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine and melphalan together with antithymocyte globulin before a peripheral blood stem cell transplant works in treating patients with autoimmune neurologic disease that did not respond to previous therapy. In autoimmune neurological diseases, the patient’s own immune system ‘attacks’ the nervous system which might include the brain / spinal cord and / or the peripheral nerves. Giving high-dose chemotherapy, including carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan, and antithymocyte globulin, before a peripheral blood stem cell transplant weakens the immune system and may help stop the immune system from ‘attacking’ a patient's nervous system. When the patient’s own (autologous) stem cells are infused into the patient they help the bone marrow make red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets so the blood counts can improve.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Haploidentical Donor Stem Cell Transplant plus Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well a partially matched (haploidentical) donor stem cell transplant and umbilical cord blood transplant works compared to a matched unrelated (not a sibling or family member) stem cell donor in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that is likely to recur (come back), or spread (high-risk). When matched family members cannot be identified, doctors use the stem cells of other healthy volunteers whose blood type matches the patients' blood. Another transplant procedure uses stem cells from umbilical cord blood (UCB) from the placenta of newborn baby. Chemotherapy and total-body irradiation are given before transplant to help stop the growth of cancer cells in the bone marrow and weaken the immune system so that the transplant cells can grow. It may take time to find a donor who is not a family member but matches the patient's blood type. Giving an umbilical cord blood transplant with a partially matched stem cell transplant may be as effective as a matched stem cell transplant in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Ixazomib Citrate Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed High-Risk Multiple Myeloma

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects of combination chemotherapy and donor stem cell transplant followed by ixazomib citrate maintenance therapy in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has returned after a period of improvement and is likely to recur (come back), or spread. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Giving ixazomib citrate after the transplant may improve the overall treatment outcome without causing additional toxicities.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Immunotherapy Following Reduced Intensity Conditioning and Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant for Poor Risk CD30+ Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients

    Patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma who are CD30+ will receive a standard of care reduced intensity regimen and an allogeneic stem cell transplant (from another person, related or unrelated). Following recovery, patients will receive a medication called Brentuximab Vendotin which is targeted against CD30+ cells. The study hypothesis is that this treatment will be safe and well tolerated in children and young adults.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Vaccine Therapy and Therapeutic Autologous Lymphocytes in Treating Patients With Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well vaccine therapy works in treating patients with multiple myeloma undergoing stem cell transplant. Vaccines made from a person's white blood cells mixed with cancer proteins may help the body build an effective immune response to kill cancer cells that express multiple myeloma. It is not yet known whether therapeutic autologous lymphocytes are more effective when given together with vaccine therapy.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Melphalan, Carboplatin, Mannitol, and Sodium Thiosulfate in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Progressive CNS Embryonal or Germ Cell Tumors

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of melphalan when given together with carboplatin, mannitol, and sodium thiosulfate, and to see how well they work in treating patients with recurrent or progressive central nervous system (CNS) embryonal or germ cell tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as melphalan and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) uses mannitol to open the blood vessels around the brain and allow cancer-killing substances to be carried directly to the brain. Sodium thiosulfate may help lessen or prevent hearing loss and toxicities in patients undergoing chemotherapy with carboplatin and BBBD. Giving melphalan together with carboplatin, mannitol, and sodium thiosulfate may be an effective treatment for recurrent or progressive CNS embryonal or germ cell tumors.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Different Therapies in Treating Infants With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia

    RATIONALE: Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It also helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving cyclosporine, methotrexate, leucovorin, and antithymocyte globulin before and after transplant may stop this from happening. It is not yet known which treatment regimen is most effective in treating acute leukemia. PURPOSE: This randomized clinical trial is studying how well different therapies work in treating infants with newly diagnosed acute leukemia.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Chemotherapy with or without Total Body Irradiation before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy with or without total body irradiation before stem cell transplantation works in treating patients with Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy, such as total body irradiation, uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. It is not known whether chemotherapy with or without total body irradiation before stem cell transplant works better in treating patients with Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Combination Chemotherapy, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Secondary Myelofibrosis

    This phase I pilot clinical trial studies the side effects of combination chemotherapy, total body irradiation, and donor blood stem cell transplant in treating patients with secondary myelofibrosis. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Giving combination chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor blood stem cell transplant helps to stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Melphalan, Total Marrow Irradiation, and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients with High-Risk Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of melphalan and total marrow irradiation and how well they work with autologous stem cell transplantation in treating patients with high-risk multiple myeloma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Total marrow irradiation is a type of radiation therapy and a form of total body irradiation that may deliver focused radiation to the major marrow sites where cancer cells reside. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a peripheral autologous blood stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. More chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Blinatumomab after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma or Transformed Large Cell Lymphoma

    This pilot phase I trial studies how well blinatumomab works after stem cell transplant in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or transformed large cell lymphoma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells and improve response to the transplant.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Cyclophosphamide and Bendamustine after Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Preventing GVHD in Patients with Leukemia or Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of bendamustine when given together with cyclophosphamide after donor bone marrow transplant and to see how well they work in preventing graft versus host disease (GVHD) in patients with leukemia or lymphoma. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving bendamustine and cyclophosphamide after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: The University of Arizona Medical Center-University Campus, Tucson, Arizona

  • Reduced Intensity Conditioning and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well reduced intensity conditioning (a short course of chemotherapy) and stem cell transplant work in treating patients with blood cancer. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Giving reduced intensity conditioning and total body irradiation before a donor blood stem cell transplant helps to stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells with shorter recovery and fewer side effects.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Engineered Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of engineered donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Using T cells specially selected from donor blood in the laboratory for transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Ruxolitinib Phosphate and Chemotherapy Given before and after Reduced Intensity Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Myelofibrosis

    This pilot clinical trial studies the side effects and best dose of ruxolitinib phosphate when given together with chemotherapy before and after a donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with myelofibrosis. Ruxolitinib phosphate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ruxolitinib phosphate together with chemotherapy before and after a donor stem cell transplant may help stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California


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