Clinical Trials Using Thiotepa

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Thiotepa. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-23 of 23
  • Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant with or without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well donor umbilical cord blood transplant with or without ex-vivo expanded cord blood progenitor cells works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, or myelodysplastic syndromes. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's cells. When the healthy stem cells and ex-vivo expanded cord blood progenitor cells are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. It is not yet known whether giving donor umbilical cord blood transplant plus ex-vivo expanded cord blood progenitor cells is more effective than giving a donor umbilical cord blood transplant alone.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients with Medulloblastoma or Other Central Nervous System Primitive Neuro-ectodermal Tumors

    This randomized clinical trial studies how well standard chemotherapy works in treating young patients with medulloblastoma or other central nervous system primitive neuro-ectodermal tumors. Drugs used in standard chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Selective Depletion of CD45RA+ T Cells from Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Grafts from HLA-Matched Related and Unrelated Donors in Preventing GVHD

    This phase II trial studies how well selective T cell depletion works in preventing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, or chronic myelogenous leukemia undergoing donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Removing a subset of the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cyclophosphamide or Thalidomide after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with Solid Tumors

    This pilot clinical trial studies cyclophosphamide or thalidomide following high dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating younger patients with solid tumors. Drugs such as cyclophosphamide and thalidomide suppress the growth of new blood vessels to tumors. Blocking blood flow to tumors after receiving high dose chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant may prevent the tumors from coming back or continuing to grow.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplant in Promoting Stem Cell Engraftment in Patients with Severe Sickle Cell Disease Undergoing Donor Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I clinical trial studies the side effects and best dose of mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells in promoting stem cell engraftment in patients with severe sickle cell disease who are undergoing a donor blood stem cell transplant. Mesenchymal stem cells obtained from the patient and grown outside the body in a laboratory may have a lower chance of being rejected, and may promote tolerance, helping the donor’s immune cells accept the recipient’s body.
    Location: Children's Healthcare of Atlanta - Egleston, Atlanta, Georgia

  • Partially HLA-Mismatched Related Donor Stem Cell Transplant Using Killer Immunoglobulin Receptor and Human Leukocyte Antigen Based Donor Selection in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well partially human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched related donor stem cell transplant using killer immunoglobulin receptor or HLA based donor selection works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Partially mismatched donor stem cells may reduce the risk of cancer recurring after transplant.
    Location: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Busulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplantation

    This phase II trial studies the side effect of busulfan, fludarabine phosphate, and post-transplant cyclophosphamide in treating patients with blood cancer undergoing donor stem cell transplantation. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as busulfan, fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy such as busulfan and fludarabine phosphate before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide after the transplant may stop this from happening. Once the donated stem cells begin working, the patient's immune system may see the remaining cancer cells as not belonging in the patient's body and destroy them.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Blinatumomab and T Cell Depleted Donor Blood Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Hematologic Malignancy after a Previous Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well blinatumomab and T cell depleted donor blood cell transplant work in treating children and young adults with hematologic cancer that has not responded or has come back after a previous transplant. White blood cells from donors may be able to kill cancer cells in patients with hematologic cancer. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Removing the T cells from the donor cells before the transplant may stop this from happening. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving blinatumomab after a blood cell transplant may destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • High-Dose Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    This phase II trial studies how well high-dose, or myeloablative, chemotherapy and stem cell transplant works in treating patients with neuroblastoma that is at high risk of spreading. Myeloablative chemotherapy uses high doses of chemotherapy to kill cells in the bone marrow, both cancer cells and healthy cells. Healthy stem cells from the patient that were collected before chemotherapy are then returned to the patient in a stem cell transplant to replace the cells that were killed by chemotherapy. Myeloablative chemotherapy and stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for patients with high-risk neuroblastoma.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Genetically Modified Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Zoledronic Acid in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed / Refractory Hematologic Malignancies or High Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of zoledronic acid given after genetically modified donor stem cell transplant in treating younger patients with hematologic malignancies or high risk tumors that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or do not response to treatment (refractory). Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When healthy stem cells from a donor that have been genetically modified are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus after the transplant may stop this from happening. Giving zoledronic acid after the transplant may help strengthen the immune system and make the immune cells work better.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Partially-Matched Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This pilot clinical trial studies partially-matched donor stem cell transplant in treating younger patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies. Giving chemotherapy and / or total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Lurie Children's Hospital-Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

  • Donor Progenitor Cell and Natural Kill Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well donor progenitor cell and natural killer cell transplant works in treating younger patients with cancers of the blood that are at high risk of coming back or spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient’s immune system from rejecting the donor’s stem cells. When certain stem cells and natural killer cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient’s bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body’s normal cells. Removing the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • High-Dose Unrelated Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant with T-cell Depleted Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Infusion in Treating Patients with High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well high-dose unrelated donor umbilical cord blood transplant with T-cell depleted peripheral blood stem cell infusion works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies that are likely to come back or spread (high-risk). Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from an unrelated donor that do not exactly match the patient's blood are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    This pilot clinical trial studies a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant in treating patients with hematological malignancies. Giving chemotherapy with or without total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Progressive Germ Cell Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant works in treating patients with recurrent or progressive germ cell tumors. The combination chemotherapy, consisting of gemcitabine hydrochloride, paclitaxel, and oxaliplatin stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. More chemotherapy, including carboplatin, thiotepa, and etoposide, is given at high doses. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the high-dose chemotherapy.
    Location: Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California

  • Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, Paclitaxel, Oxaliplatin, High-Dose Chemotherapy, and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well gemcitabine hydrochloride, paclitaxel, oxaliplatin, high dose chemotherapy, and stem cell transplant work in treating patients with central nervous system germ cell tumors that have come back after a period of improvement or that have not responded to previous treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, paclitaxel and oxaliplatin work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. More chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Giving gemcitabine hydrochloride, paclitaxel, oxaliplatin, high dose chemotherapy, and stem cell transplant may work better in treating patients with central nervous system term cell tumors.
    Location: Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio

  • Disease-Specific High-Dose Conditioning Regimens in Treating Patients Undergoing T-cell Depleted Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancies or Other Lethal Hematologic Disorders

    This phase II trial studies how well disease-specific high-dose conditioning regimens work in treating patients undergoing T-cell depleted peripheral blood stem cell transplant for hematologic malignancies or other lethal hematologic disorders. Giving high doses of chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving antithymocyte globulin and removing the T-cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Thiotepa, and Total Body Irradiation Before Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well fludarabine phosphate, cyclophosphamide, thiotepa, and total body irradiation before donor umbilical cord blood transplant work in treating patients with blood cancer. Giving chemotherapy and total body irradiation, before donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil before the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Mismatched Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies mismatched donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Giving chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells and helps stop the patient’s immune system from rejecting the donor’s stem cells. When certain stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient’s bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body’s normal cells. Removing the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Indiana University / Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, Indiana

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Natural Killer Cells in Treating Patients With Advanced or Refractory Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of natural killer cells when given together with a donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient’s immune system from rejecting the donor’s stem cells. When the certain stem cells and natural killer (NK) cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient’s bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body’s normal cells. Removing the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Indiana University / Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, Indiana

  • Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Germ Cell Tumors

    Treatment options for relapsed or refractory germ cell tumors (GCT) patients are limited. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue (autologous stem cell transplant), when given sequentially, has shown that a subset of patients may be cured. The optimal high-dose chemotherapy regimen, however, is unknown. In this trial, we will use tandem autologous transplants with non-cross resistant conditioning regimens to treat patients with relapsed / refractory GCTs.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Iobenguane I-131 or Crizotinib and Standard Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Newly-Diagnosed High-Risk Neuroblastoma or Ganglioneuroblastoma

    This partially randomized phase III trial studies iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy in treating younger patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma. Radioactive drugs, such as iobenguane I-131, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Crizotinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving iobenguane I-131 or crizotinib and standard therapy may work better in treating younger patients with neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma.
    Location: Childrens Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Palifermin with Leuprolide Acetate after Total-Body Irradiation Based Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well giving palifermin with leuprolide acetate works after total body-irradiation based donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Giving chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving palifermin and leuprolide acetate and removing the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening. It is not yet known whether giving palifermin with leuprolide is more effective in helping the immune system recover faster after a donor stem cell transplant.
    Location: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York