Clinical Trials Using Abatacept

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Abatacept. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-3 of 3
  • Abatacept, Ixazomib Citrate, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma Resistant to Chemotherapy

    This phase II trial studies how well abatacept, ixazomib citrate, and dexamethasone work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that is resistant to chemotherapy. Abatacept may block certain proteins that are present on multiple myeloma cells that have been shown to protect against chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as ixazomib citrate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as dexamethasone, lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Giving abatacept, ixazomib citrate, and dexamethasone may work better at treating patients with multiple myeloma resistant to chemotherapy.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cyclophosphamide and Abatacept for the Treatment of Graft-Versus-Host Disease after Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Hematologic Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well cyclophosphamide and abatacept work in reducing the incidence of moderate and severe chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following donor stem cell transplantation in patients with hematologic (blood) cancers. GVHD occurs when the cells from the donor (the graft) see the body's cells (the host) as different and attack them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunosuppressive therapy, such as abatacept, is used to decrease the body’s immune response. The combination of cyclophosphamide and abatacept following donor stem cell transplantation may work better in reducing the incidence of moderate and severe chronic GVHD compared to standard of care.
    Location: University of California San Diego, San Diego, California

  • High-Dose Cyclophosphamide, Abatacept, and Tacrolimus for the Prevention of Graft Versus Host Disease following Donor Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Hematologic Cancers

    This phase Ib / II trial investigates the effect of combination therapy with high-dose cyclophosphamide, abatacept, and tacrolimus to prevent the occurrence of graft versus host disease (GvHD) after donor stem cell transplantation in patients with hematologic (blood) cancers. GvHD is a condition that occurs when donated stem cells or bone marrow (the graft) see the healthy tissues in the patient’s body (the host) as foreign and attack them. T cells play a key role in the development of GvHD. Cyclophosphamide, abatacept and tacrolimus may be effective in preventing GvHD development by inhibiting the growth, replication or activity of T cells.
    Location: Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone, New York, New York