Clinical Trials Using Alpha-type-1 Polarized Dendritic Cells

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Alpha-type-1 Polarized Dendritic Cells. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-2 of 2
  • Polarized Dendritic Cell (aDC1) Vaccine, Interferon Alpha-2, Rintalolimid, and Celecoxib for the Treatment of HLA-A2+ Refractory Melanoma

    This phase II trial studies how well polarized dendritic cell (aDC1) vaccine, interferon alpha-2, rintatolimod, and celecoxib work together in treating patients with HLA-A2 positive (+) melanoma that has not responded to previous treatment (refractory). The aDC1 vaccine contains white blood cells (dendritic cells or DCs) that stimulates the immune system. Interferon alpha-2 can improve the body’s natural response to infections and other diseases. It can also interfere with the division of cancer cells and slow tumor growth. Rintalolimid may stimulate the immune system. Celecoxib is a drug that reduces pain. This study is being done to find out if aDC1 vaccine, interferon alpha-2, rintatolimod, and celecoxib can prevent the growth and / or progression of melanoma.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Specialized Immune Cells (nCTLs) and a Vaccine (Alpha-type-1 Polarized Dendritic Cells) in Treating Patients with Stage II-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This phase I / IIa trial studies the side effects and best dose of a type of specialized immune cell (natural killer cell-like cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) (nCTLs) and how well they work when given with a vaccine (alpha-type-1 polarized dendritic cells) in treating patients with stage II-IV ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. nCTLs are immune cells that are isolated from each patient’s blood and "taught" in the laboratory how to recognize and eliminate tumor cells. These "educated" immune cells are then given back to the patient. An alpha-type-1 polarized dendritic cell vaccine is another population of "educated" immune cells that work to support the infused nCTLs. Giving nCTLS with a dendritic cell vaccine may work better in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York