Clinical Trials Using Anti-CD22 CAR-expressing T Lymphocytes

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Anti-CD22 CAR-expressing T Lymphocytes. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-2 of 2
  • Autologous CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T Cells for the Treatment of Recurrent or Refractory B Cell Malignancies or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I / Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of autologous CD22 CAR T cells and to see how well it works in treating patients with B cell malignancies or acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. More chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. In this study, some of patients' immune cells (called T cells) will be collected during a procedure called ‘leukapheresis’, and genetically modify them to recognize the antigen (marker) CD22 on cancer cells. CD22 is commonly found on B cell cancers. The CAR is a genetically-engineered receptor made recognize a specific molecule, which in this study is the CD22 protein, and activate or ‘turn on’ immune cells. Doctors use a type of virus to introduce the CAR receptor into patients' T cells to make the CD22 CAR T cells, so they may find and kill those cancer cells in the body.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Genetically Engineered Cells (CD22-CAR T Cells) for the Treatment of Recurrent or Refractory B Cell Malignancies

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and how well cell therapy (CD22-CAR T cells) works for the treatment of B cell malignancies that have come back (recurrent) and does not respond to treatment (refractory). The antigen CD22 is commonly found on B cell cancers. In this study, a CD22 gene and a type of virus (lentivirus; a virus similar to HIV) are used in making the cells (CD22-CAR T cells). The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a genetically-engineered receptor made so that immune cells can recognize and respond to a specific molecule, such as CD22 protein. This uses a portion of an antibody to CD22 and part of a molecule that activates or ‘turns on’ the immune cell. Together, the CAR may help these T cells find the cancer in the body. Giving chemotherapy (fludarabine and cyclophosphamide) before CD22-CAR T cells may help prepare the immune system to accept the CD22-CAR T cells.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California