Clinical Trials Using Belinostat

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Belinostat. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-6 of 6
  • Testing the Combination of Belinostat and SGI-110 (Guadecitabine) for the Treatment of Unresectable and Metastatic Conventional Chondrosarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well belinostat and SGI-110 (guadecitabine) work in treating patients with conventional chondrosarcoma that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) and has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Belinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as guadecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving belinostat and guadecitabine may lower the chance of chondrosarcoma growing or spreading.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Pevonedistat and Belinostat in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I trial studies side effects and best dose of pevonedistat and belinostat in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pevonedistat and belinostat, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Belinostat and Zidovudine for the Treatment of HTLV-I Positive T-Cell Leukemia or Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well belinostat and zidovudine work for the treatment of HTLV-I positive T cell leukemia or lymphoma. Belinostat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth and may kill cancer cells and cause viruses that are inactive in cells to become active. Zidovudine is an antiviral agent. When given with interferon alpha may help lower the levels and control disease so that cancer does not get worse or come back. Interferon alpha is a man-made copy of a protein that is produced by the body in response to infections. Interferon alpha may help the immune system fight disease and may slow or stop the growth of cancer cells. Giving belinostat and zidovudine may work better in eliminating disease and making cancer disappear from the body compared to chemotherapy or antiviral drugs.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Ribociclib and Belinostat in Patients with Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer or Recurrent Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer, Charge Study

    This phase I / Ib trial investigates the side effects and best dose of ribociclib and belinostat and how well they work treating patients with triple negative breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic) or ovarian cancer that responds at first to treatment with drugs that contain the metal platinum but then comes back within a certain period (platinum-resistant) and has come back (recurrent). Ribociclib and belinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving ribociclib and belinostat in combination may work better to treat patients with breast cancer and ovarian cancer compared to either drug alone.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Belinostat in Combination with Nivolumab Alone and with Ipilimumab for the Treatment of Unresectable, Locally Advanced, Advanced, or Metastatic Cancer

    This phase I trial identifies the side effects and best dose of belinostat in combination with nivolumab alone and with ipilimumab in treating patients with cancer that is cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) and has spread to nearby tissues or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or has spread to other places in the body (advanced or metastatic). Belinostat is a potential anti‐cancer drug, known as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which means that belinostat stops the activity of HDAC enzymes (an enzyme is a protein that in small amounts can speed up a biological reaction). Dysfunctional HDAC activity can lead to the uncontrolled growth of tumor cells. Nivolumab and ipilimumab are types of immunotherapy. Nivolumab works by attaching to and blocking a molecule called PD-1, a protein that is present on different types of cells in the immune system and controls parts of the immune system by shutting it down. Ipilimumab is an antibody that attaches itself to toxic substances (antigens) that cause the body to have an immune response and blocks immune tolerance. It is not yet known if giving belinostat in combination with nivolumab alone and with ipilimumab will work better in treating patients with cancer.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Direct Tumor Microinjection and FDG-PET in Testing Drug Sensitivity in Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Stage IV Breast Cancer

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects of direct tumor microinjection and fludeoxyglucose F-18 positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in testing drug sensitivity in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, or stage IV breast cancer that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Injecting tiny amounts of anti-cancer drugs directly into tumors on the skin or in lymph nodes and diagnostic procedures, such as FDG-PET, may help to show which drugs work better in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, or breast cancer.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota