Clinical Trials Using Blinatumomab

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Blinatumomab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 26
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  • Combination Chemotherapy with or without Blinatumomab in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed BCR-ABL-Negative B Lineage Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies combination chemotherapy with blinatumomab to see how well it works compared to induction chemotherapy alone in treating patients with newly diagnosed breakpoint cluster region (BCR)-c-abl oncogene 1, non-receptor tyrosine kinase (ABL)-negative B lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without blinatumomab in treating newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 447 locations

  • Blinatumomab in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well blinatumomab works compared with standard combination chemotherapy in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed). Immunotherapy with blinatumomab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether standard combination chemotherapy is more effective than blinatumomab in treating relapsed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 164 locations

  • Blinatumomab and Combination Chemotherapy or Dasatinib, Prednisone, and Blinatumomab in Treating Older Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well blinatumomab and combination chemotherapy or dasatinib, prednisone, and blinatumomab work in treating older patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Immunotherapy with blinatumomab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as prednisone, vincristine sulfate, methotrexate, and mercaptopurine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Dasatinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving blinatumomab with combination chemotherapy or dasatinib and prednisone may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 154 locations

  • Blinatumomab in Combination with Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with or without Down Syndrome and Newly Diagnosed, Standard Risk B-Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Localized B-Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This phase III trial studies how well blinatumomab works in combination with chemotherapy in treating patients with or without Down syndrome and newly diagnosed, standard risk B-lymphoblastic leukemia or B-lymphoblastic lymphoma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine, dexamethasone, prednisone, prednisolone, pegaspargase, methotrexate, cytarabine, mercaptopurine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and thioguanine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Leucovorin decreases the toxic effects of methotrexate. Giving monoclonal antibody therapy with chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells. Giving blinatumomab and combination chemotherapy may work better then combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with B-ALL. This trial also assigns patients into different chemotherapy treatment regimens based on risk (the chance of cancer returning after treatment). Treating patients with chemotherapy based on risk may help doctors decide which patients can best benefit from which chemotherapy treatment regimens.
    Location: 42 locations

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Blinatumomab in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed, Recurrent, or Refractory CD22-Positive B-Lineage Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well inotuzumab ozogamicin and blinatumomab work in treating patients with CD22-positive B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia that is newly diagnosed, has come back, or does not respond to treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin and blinatumomab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 17 locations

  • Lenalidomide and Blinatumomab in Treating Patients with Relapsed Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of lenalidomide and blinatumomab when given together in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement. Biological therapies, such as lenalidomide and blinatumomab, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing.
    Location: 15 locations

  • Blinatumomab and Nivolumab with or without Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with Poor-Risk Relapsed or Refractory CD19+ Precursor B-Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of blinatumomab when given with nivolumab alone or nivolumab and ipilimumab in treating patients with poor-risk CD19+ precursor B-lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back after a period of improvement (relapsed) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, nivolumab, and ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Blinatumomab, Pembrolizumab, and Methotrexate in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory CD19 Positive B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies how well blinatumomab and pembrolizumab work in treating patients with CD19 positive B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in the chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving blinatumomab, pembrolizumab, and methotrexate may work better in treating patients with CD19 positive B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Low-Intensity Chemotherapy and Blinatumomab in treating Patients with Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well low-intensity chemotherapy and blinatumomab work in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, filgrastim, pegfilgrastim, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, cytarabine and vincristine sulfate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving low-intensity chemotherapy and blinatumomab may work better at treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Pembrolizumab and Blinatumomab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I / II studies the side effects of pembrolizumab and blinatumomab and to see how well they work in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or has not responded to the treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab and blinatumomab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Blinatumomab, Methotrexate, Cytarabine, and Ponatinib in Treating Patients with Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive, or BCR-ABL Positive, or Relapsed / Refractory, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well blinatumomab, methotrexate, cytarabine, and ponatinib work in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-positive, or BCR-ABL positive, or acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Ponatinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving blinatumomab, methotrexate, cytarabine, and ponatinib may work better in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Blinatumomab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    This early phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of blinatumomab in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment who are undergoing stem cell transplant. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Blinatumomab in Treating Participants with Richter Transformation

    This phase II trial studies how well blinatumomab works in treating participants with Richter transformation. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Blinatumomab in Treating Patients with Pre B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) and B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and how well blinatumomab works in treating patients with pre B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) who undergo stem cell transplant. Blinatumomab is an antibody. Antibodies are made of proteins that the immune system uses to fight off foreign proteins such as the ones found in infectious organisms. Researchers have designed blinatumomab to engage body’s immune system to attack cells expressing CD19, a protein, which is commonly expressed on leukemia and lymphoma cells in patients with pre-B ALL or NHL. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Blinatumomab after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma or Transformed Large Cell Lymphoma

    This pilot phase I trial studies how well blinatumomab works after stem cell transplant in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or transformed large cell lymphoma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells and improve response to the transplant.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Ibrutinib and Blinatumomab in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well ibrutinib and blinatumomab work in treating patients with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or is not responding to treatment. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving ibrutinib and blinatumomab may work better in treating patients with relapsed or refractory B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • A Phase 1b Open-Label Study Investigating the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Administration of Subcutaneous Blinatumomab for the Treatment of Relapsed / Refractory Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Primary Objective: • To evaluate the safety and tolerability of subcutaneous (SC) blinatumomab dose administrations Secondary Objectives: - To determine pharmacokinetics (PK) with continuous intravenous (cIV) and SC administrations - To estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) tested for blinatumomab administered subcutaneously - To determine the incidence of anti-blinatumomab antibody formation following SC administration - To evaluate efficacy response following treatment with SC blinatumomab administration Exploratory Objective: - To determine the pharmacodynamics (PD) time profiles for B-and T-lymphocytes as well as cytokine profiles during SC administration - To evaluate efficacy response following treatment with SC blinatumomab administration using Lugano criteria if positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET / CT) is used for evaluation
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Blinatumomab and Combination Chemotherapy as Frontline Therapy in Treating Patients with B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well blinatumomab and combination chemotherapy work as frontline therapy in treating patients with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, dexamethasone, cytarabine, mercaptopurine, methotrexate, and prednisone work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving blinatumomab and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia than chemotherapy alone.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Blinatumomab in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well blinatumomab works in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back or has not responded to treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread
    Location: Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Blinatumomab after Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well blinatumomab works as maintenance therapy after donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Blinatumomab and T Cell Depleted Donor Blood Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Hematologic Malignancy after a Previous Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well blinatumomab and T cell depleted donor blood cell transplant work in treating children and young adults with hematologic cancer that has not responded or has come back after a previous transplant. White blood cells from donors may be able to kill cancer cells in patients with hematologic cancer. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Removing the T cells from the donor cells before the transplant may stop this from happening. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving blinatumomab after a blood cell transplant may destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Blinatumomab in Treating Patients with B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia with Minimal Residual Disease

    This phase II trial studies how well blinatumomab works in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia whose disease is in remission (causes no symptoms or signs) but is still present in a small number of cells in the body (minimal residual disease). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients with Previously Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin and to see how well it works when given together with combination chemotherapy in treating older patients with previously untreated acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin and blinatumomab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin together with combination chemotherapy may be a better treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Open Label Study Investigating the Safety and Efficacy of Blinatumomab in Combination With Pembrolizumab (KEYNOTE-348)

    Phase 1b: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of blinatumomab in combination with pembrolizumab in adult subjects with relapsed or refractory (r / r) DLBCL
    Location: Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina

  • Effect of Blinatumomab on MRD in DLBCL Subjects Post aHSCT

    The study will estimate the minimal residual disease (MRD)-negative response rate after treatment with blinatumomab in subjects with high-risk DLBCL who are MRD-positive following autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT). The clinical hypothesis is that the MRD-negative response rate will be greater than 10%. Achieving an MRD-negative response rate of 30% would be of scientific and clinical interest.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov


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