Clinical Trials Using Bortezomib

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Bortezomib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-42 of 42

  • A Study of Teclistamab With Other Anticancer Therapies in Participants With Multiple Myeloma

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the safety and tolerability of teclistamab when administered in different combination regimen and to identify the optimal dose(s) of teclistamab combination regimens.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Study to Determine Recommended Phase 2 Dose of Intravenous (IV) Eftozanermin Alfa in Combination With IV or Subcutaneous (SC) Bortezomib and Oral Dexamethasone Tablet and to Assess Change in Disease Symptoms in Adult Participants With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a rare cancer caused by abnormal survival of plasma cells (blood cells). Most trial participants with MM relapse (cancer has come back) or become non- responsive to treatment and remission gets shorter after each line of treatment. This is a study to determine recommended Phase 2 dose and change in disease symptoms of eftozanermin alfa in combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone to assess how efficient the treatment is in adult participants with relapsed / refractory (R / R) MM. Eftozanermin alfa (ABBV-621) is an investigational drug being developed for the treatment of R / R Multiple Myeloma (MM). Study doctors put the participants in 1 of the 2 groups, called treatment arms. Each group receives a different treatment. Participants in one arm will receive different doses of eftozanermin alfa in combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone to determine phase 2 dose (RP2D). Participants in the other arm will receive eftozanermin alfa at RP2D in combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone. Around 40 adult participants with relapsed / refractory multiple myeloma will be enrolled at approximately 20 sites across the world. Participants will receive eftozanermin alfa as an infusion into the vein in combination with bortezomib as an infusion into the vein or an injection under the skin and oral dexamethasone tablets for 12 cycles. Each cycle is 21 days for cycles 1-8 and 35 days for cycles 9-12. There may be higher treatment burden for participants in this trial compared to their standard of care. Participants will attend regular visits during the study at a hospital or clinic. The effect of the treatment will be checked by medical assessments, blood tests, checking for side effects.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Daratumumab-Based Therapy for the Treatment of Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma with Kidney Failure

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab-based therapy works in treating patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma with kidney failure. Daratumumab-based therapy includes daratumumab, bortezomib, dexamethasone, and thalidomide or lenalidomide. Daratumumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Bortezomib is a drug that prevents myeloma cells from getting rid of their waste products, leading to being targeted for death. Dexamethasone is a steroid that is commonly used, either alone or in combination with other drugs, to treat multiple myeloma. Lenalidomide and thalidomide may stop the growth of multiple myeloma by blocking the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth. Giving daratumumab, bortezomib, dexamethasone, and thalidomide or lenalidomide may be a good way to treat patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma with kidney failure.
    Location: Emory University Hospital / Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia

  • Daratumumab and Dexamethasone with or without Lenalidomide or Bortezomib for the Treatment of Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma in Older Adults

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab and dexamethasone with or without lenalidomide or bortezomib works in treating older adults with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Daratumumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as dexamethasone lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving daratumumab and dexamethasone with lenalidomide or bortezomib may work better in treating older adults with multiple myeloma compared to daratumumab and dexamethasone.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Daratumumab, Ixazomib, and Dexamethasone with or without Bortezomib in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab, ixazomib, and dexamethasone with or without bortezomib work in treating patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Daratumumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Ixazomib and bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as dexamethasone lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. It is not yet known whether giving daratumumab, ixazomib, and dexamethasone with or without bortezomib may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: Emory University Hospital / Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia

  • Serial Measurements of Molecular and Architectural Responses to Therapy (SMMART) PRIME Trial

    This phase Ib trial determines if samples from a patient’s cancer can be tested to find combinations of drugs that provide clinical benefit for the kind of cancer the patient has. This study is also being done to understand why cancer drugs can stop working and how different cancers in different people respond to different types of therapy.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Daratumumab, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone Followed by Daratumumab, Ixazomib, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab, bortezomib, and dexamethasone followed by daratumumab, ixazomib, and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back (relapsed) or does not response to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as daratumumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Bortezomib and ixazomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving daratumumab, bortezomib, and dexamethasone followed by daratumumab, ixazomib, and dexamethasone may work better and help to control cancer in patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Lymphoblastic Lymphoma, Burkitt Lymphoma / Leukemia, or Double-Hit Lymphoma / Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, lymphoblastic lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma / leukemia, or double-hit lymphoma / leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as clofarabine, etoposide, cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate liposome, dexamethasone and bortezomib, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Ruxolitinib Phosphate and Bortezomib in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ruxolitinib phosphate and bortezomib in treating patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoma. Ruxolitinib phosphate and bortezomib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • Trial of the Combination of Bortezomib and Clofarabine in Adults With Relapsed Solid Tumors

    Background: - Researchers want to develop better ways to treat cancer. In this study, they will give people with cancer two drugs. These drugs have been used on their own to treat some blood cell cancers. Objectives: - To test the safety and efficacy of the drug combination of bortezomib and clofarabine. Eligibility: - Adults age 18 and over with advanced cancer that has progressed after receiving standard treatment or that has no effective therapy. Design: - Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, and scans to measure their tumors. They will also have heart, blood, and urine tests. All of these may be done by their regular doctors. - Participants will get the study drugs in 21-day cyles. They will stay at the clinic for week 1 of every cycle, then have 2 weeks off. - Bortezomib will be injected under the skin on days 1 and 4. - Clofarabine will be injected in a vein for days 1-5. - During cycle 1 only, participants will go to the clinic or their doctor to have a physical exam and blood tests at the start of the second and third week. - Participants will have clinical evaluations throughout the study, including before receiving treatment and then before the start of each cycle. - Participants may stay in the study as long as they are tolerating the drugs and their tumor is not getting worse. - Participants will have follow-up for 30 days after the last dose of study drugs. - The first part of this study tests the safety of different doses of clofarabine and bortezomib. - The second part of this study involves a separate group of participants who will undergo mandatory research biopsies to learn more about the effects of clofarabine and bortezomib on cancer cells.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Belantamab Mafodotin Plus Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone (Pd) Versus Bortezomib Plus Pd in Relapsed / Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This study will evaluate the efficacy and safety of belantamab mafodotin in combination with pomalidomide and dexamethasone (Arm A) compared with that of combination of pomalidomide, bortezomib and dexamethasone (Arm B) in participants with relapsed / refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM).
    Location: 2 locations

  • Modified VR-CAP and Acalabrutinib as First Line Therapy for the Treatment of Transplant-Eligible Patients with Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial investigates how well modified VR-CAP (bortezomib, rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, prednisone, and cytarabine hydrochloride) and acalabrutinib as first line therapy work in treating transplant-eligible patients with mantle cell lymphoma. Modified VR-CAP is a combination of drugs used as standard first line treatment for mantle cell lymphoma. Chemotherapy drugs, such as bortezomib, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cytarabine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that binds and depletes malignant B cells, by inducing immune responses and direct toxicity. Acalabrutinib blocks a key enzyme which is needed for malignant cell growth in mantle cell lymphoma. Combining modified VR-CAP and acalabrutinib as first line therapy may be more useful against mantle cell lymphoma compared to the usual treatment.
    Location: University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake, Seattle, Washington

  • Daratumumab, Lenalidomide, Dexamethasone and Bortezomib for the Treatment of Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial how well daratumumab, lenalidomide, bortezomib and dexamethasone work in treating patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma who are minimal residual disease (MRD) positive after initial treatment. Daratumumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide and bortezomib, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as dexamethasone, lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Giving daratumumab, lenalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone together may work better compared to lenalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone alone in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Study Evaluating Venetoclax (ABT-199) in Multiple Myeloma Subjects Who Are Receiving Bortezomib and Dexamethasone as Standard Therapy

    This is a Phase 3, multicenter, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study evaluating the efficacy and safety of venetoclax plus bortezomib and dexamethasone in subjects with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who are considered sensitive or naïve to proteasome inhibitors and received 1 to 3 prior lines of therapy for multiple myeloma.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Cyclophosphamide and Bortezomib in Preventing Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Hematological Malignancies after Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well cyclophosphamide and bortezomib work in preventing graft versus host disease (GvHD) in patients with hematological malignancies following a blood stem cell transplant. In GvHD, the immune cells from the donor (the graft) attack the body of the transplant patient (the host). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and bortezomib, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Cyclophosphamide and bortezomib may also be an effective treatment for graft-versus-host disease caused by a blood stem cell transplant in patients with hematological malignancies.
    Location: Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone, New York, New York

  • Microdevice for In Situ Candidate Drug Screening in Skin Lesions of T-Cell Lymphoma

    This pilot trial studies the side effects and feasibility of microdevice for in situ candidate drug screening in skin lesions of T-cell lymphoma. Implanting and retrieving a microdevice that releases up to 19 drugs directly within a skin lesion may be a possible tool to evaluate the effectiveness of several approved cancer drugs against cutaneous T cell lymphoma or peripheral T cell lymphoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Precise Local Injection of Anti-cancer Drugs Using Presage's CIVO Device in Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This is a feasibility study in patients with localized or metastatic soft tissue sarcoma undergoing surgery to determine how sarcoma in situ responds to injected microdoses of anti-cancer therapeutics.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon