Clinical Trials Using Carboplatin

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Carboplatin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 151-175 of 238

  • Carboplatin, Cabazitaxel and Abiraterone in Treating Patients with Metastatic Castration Sensitive Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well carboplatin, cabazitaxel and abiraterone work in treating patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other areas of the body (metastatic), but is still responding to hormone therapy (castration sensitive). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and cabazitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Abiraterone may block tissues from making androgens (male hormones), which may cause the death of tumor cells that need androgens to grow. Giving carboplatin, cabazitaxel and abiraterone may improve cancer control.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Magnetic Resonance-Guided Hypofractionated Adaptive Radiation Therapy with Chemotherapy and Durvalumab in Treating Patients with Inoperable Stage IIB, IIIA, and select IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of magnetic resonance-guided hypofractionated adaptive radiation therapy with chemotherapy and durvalumab, and to see how well they work in treating patients with stage IIB, IIIA, and select IIIB non-small cell lung cancer that cannot be treated by surgery (inoperable). Magnetic resonance-guided adaptive radiation therapy uses a machine that contains both the device that delivers the radiation and a magnetic resonance imaging scanner. This allows the treatment team to adjust or re-plan treatment during the course of treatment. Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivers higher doses of radiation therapy over a shorter period of time and may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving magnetic resonance-guided hypofractionated adaptive radiation therapy with chemotherapy and durvalumab may work better in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer compared to chemotherapy, durvalumab, and routine radiation therapy without magnetic resonance-guidance.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Durvalumab and Standard Chemotherapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Variant Histology Bladder Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of durvalumab and chemotherapy before surgery in treating patients with variant histology bladder cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, cisplatin, gemcitabine, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving durvalumab in addition to standard chemotherapy may lead to better outcomes in patients with variant histology bladder cancer.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Durvalumab in Combination with Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors, (DURVA+ study)

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of durvalumab when given together with chemotherapy in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to others places in the body (advanced). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, capecitabine, carboplatin, paclitaxel, and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy with durvalumab may improve how immune cells respond and attack tumor cells.
    Location: National Cancer Institute Developmental Therapeutics Clinic, Bethesda, Maryland

  • A Study to Determine the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Preliminary Efficacy of ABBV-927 With ABBV-368, Budigalimab (ABBV-181) and / or Chemotherapy in Participants With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    A study evaluating the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics, and preliminary efficacy of ABBV-927 with ABBV-368, Budigalimab (ABBV-181) and / or chemotherapy in participants with selected solid tumors. This study consists of 2 main parts, a dose-escalation phase and a dose-expansion phase. The dose-expansion phase can begin once the recommended phase 2 dose / maximum tolerated dose (RP2D / MTD) is determined in the dose-escalation phase.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Serial Measurements of Molecular and Architectural Responses to Therapy (SMMART) PRIME Trial

    This phase Ib trial determines if samples from a patient’s cancer can be tested to find combinations of drugs that provide clinical benefit for the kind of cancer the patient has. This study is also being done to understand why cancer drugs can stop working and how different cancers in different people respond to different types of therapy.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • A Study of TRK-950 in Combinations With Anti-Cancer Treatment Regimens in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    The main purpose of this study is to establish the safety and the recommended dose of TRK-950 in combination with FOLFIRI, Gemcitabine / Cisplatin, Gemcitabine / Carboplatin, Ramucirumab / Paclitaxel, PD1 inhibitors (Nivolumab or Pembrolizumab), and Imiquimod Cream, Bevacizumab, as well as Nivolumab / Ipilimumab for selected advanced solid tumors.
    Location: USC / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Durvalumab and Chemoradiation in Treating Patients with Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well durvalumab and chemoradiation work in treating patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer that can be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with durvalumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays or gamma rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving durvalumab and chemoradiation may make the cancer inactive for a longer period of time.
    Location: Indiana University / Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, Indiana

  • Ipatasertib in Combination with Carboplatin, Carboplatin / Paclitaxel, or Capecitabine / Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies best dose of ipatasertib and how well it works with carboplatin with or without paclitaxel in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Ipatasertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, paclitaxel, and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving ipatasertib in combination with carboplatin, carboplatin / paclitaxel, or capecitabine / atezolizumab will work better in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • A Study to Evaluate Immunotherapy Combinations in Participants With Lung Cancer

    This is a Phase 1 / 1b, multicenter, open-label, dose-escalation and dose-expansion study to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamic, and clinical activity of AB928 in combination with carboplatin and pemetrexed, with or without an anti-PD-1 antibody (pembrolizumab or zimberelimab), in participants with non-squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC).
    Location: NYP / Columbia University Medical Center / Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Leronlimab (PRO 140) Combined With Carboplatin in Patients With CCR5+ mTNBC

    This is a phase Ib / II Study of Leronlimab (PRO 140) combined with Carboplatin in Patients with CCR5+ Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer (mTNBC). Study population will consist of patients with CCR5-positive, locally advanced or metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (mTNBC) who are naïve to chemotherapy in metastatic setting but have been exposed to anthracyclines and taxane in neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings (first-line).
    Location: 3 locations

  • Nivolumab, Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, and Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Stage III HPV Positive or p16 Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab works when given together with carboplatin, paclitaxel, and radiation therapy in treating patients with stage III human papillomavirus (HPV) positive or p16 positive oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving nivolumab together with carboplatin, paclitaxel, and radiation therapy may work be better in treating patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer compared to carboplatin, paclitaxel, and radiation therapy alone.
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • A Phase I / II Trial of APG-115 in Patients With Salivary Gland Carcinoma

    This is a phase I / II trial to evaluate the efficacy of APG-115 + / - Carboplatin for the treatment p53 wild-type malignant salivary gland cancer. Part 1 consists of 2 arms, arm A is APG-115 mono-therapy and arm B is APG-115 + Carboplatin; Part 2 is single arm based on the outcome of part 1
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • Porfimer Sodium Interstitial Photodynamic Therapy with or without Standard of Care Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of interstitial photodynamic therapy and to see how well it works with standard of care chemotherapy in treating patients with head and neck cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (locally advanced) or that has come back (recurrent). Interstitial photodynamic therapy uses a light-sensitive drug called porfimer sodium. This drug is activated by laser light delivered through special fibers into the tumor. It is not yet known how well porfimer sodium interstitial photodynamic therapy works, with or without standard of care chemotherapy, in treating patients with head and neck cancer.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Pembrolizumab and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with High-Grade Obesity-Driven Endometrial Cancer

    This early phase I trial studies how well pembrolizumab works before surgery and in combination with standard chemotherapy after surgery in treating patients with high-grade obesity-driven endometrial cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab before surgery and in combination with standard chemotherapy after surgery may work better in patients with endometrial cancer.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • Pembrolizumab with Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Participants with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Small Cell / Neuroendocrine Cancers of Urothelium or Prostate

    This phase Ib trial studies how well pembrolizumab works with combination chemotherapy in treating participants with small cell / neuroendocrine cancers of the urothelium or prostate that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes or that has spread to other places in the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, docetaxel, cisplatin, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab with platinum-based chemotherapy may work better in treating participants with small cell / neuroendocrine cancers of the urothelium or prostate.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Avelumab and Chemoradiation in Treating Patients with Stage II-III Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of avelumab when given together with chemoradiation in treating patients with stage II-III esophageal and gastroesophageal junction cancer that can be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. Giving avelumab and chemoradiation may work better in treating patients with esophageal cancer.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and the Effect of Treatment on Patient-Reported Outcomes

    This phase III trial studies how well radiation therapy and chemotherapy work in treating patients with stage II-IV non-small cell lung cancer and to see the effect of treatment on patient-reported outcomes. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving accelerated radiation therapy within shorter time and chemotherapy may work better than standard radiation therapy in treating patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and may improve patient outcomes.
    Location: Montefiore Medical Center-Weiler Hospital, Bronx, New York

  • A Study Comparing Adjuvant Alectinib Versus Adjuvant Platinum-Based Chemotherapy in Patients With ALK Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This randomized, active-controlled, multicenter, open-label, Phase III study is designed to investigate the efficacy and safety of alectinib compared with platinum-based in the adjuvant setting. Participants in the experimental arm will receive alectinib at 600 mg orally twice daily (BID) taken with food for 24 months. Participants in the control arm will receive one of the protocol specified platinum based chemotherapy regimens for 4 cycles. Following treatment completion, participants will be followed up for their disease until disease recurrence. At the time of disease recurrence, participants will enter a survival follow-up until death, withdrawal of consent or study closure, whichever occurs earlier.
    Location: Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Oral Azacitidine and Salvage Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects, best dose of oral azacitidine and how well it works when given together with salvage chemotherapy in treating patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Azacitidine may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as rituximab, ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving oral azacitidine and salvage chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Docetaxel, Carboplatin, and Rucaparib Camsylate in Treating Patients with Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer with Homologous Recombination DNA Repair Deficiency

    This phase II trial studies how well docetaxel with carboplatin followed by rucaparib camsylate works in treating patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (spread outside of prostate and resistant to testosterone suppression) with homologous recombination DNA repair deficiency. Chemotherapy drugs, such as docetaxel and carboplatin, work to stop the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or spreading. Rucaparib camsylate may stop the growth of tumor cells with defects in the ability to repair mistakes in DNA by forcing additional errors so that the cancer cells cannot overcome the number of errors and will then die. Giving induction docetaxel and carboplatin followed by maintenance rucaparib camsylate may work better in treating patients with castration resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Avelumab, Utomilumab, Rituximab, Ibrutinib, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of avelumab, utomilumab, rituximab, ibrutinib, and combination chemotherapy in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or mantle cell lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, utomilumab, and rituximab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide phosphate, carboplatin, and ifosfamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving avelumab, utomilumab, rituximab, ibrutinib, and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or mantle cell lymphoma.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Sapanisertib, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Malignant Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the sides effects and best dose of sapanisertib, carboplatin, and paclitaxel in treating patients with malignant solid tumors that have come back (recurrent) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Sapanisertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving sapanisertib, carboplatin, and paclitaxel may work better in treating patients with malignant solid tumors.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • HER2 Directed Dendritic Cell Vaccine, Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab, and Chemotherapy in Treating Participants with Stage II-III HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer

    This early phase I trial studies how well a HER2 directed dendritic cell vaccine, trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and chemotherapy work in treating participants with stage II-III HER-2 positive breast cancer. Dendritic cells are immune cells that can tell the immune system to fight infection. Vaccines made from a person's dendritic cells may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells that express HER2. Trastuzumab is a form of “targeted therapy” because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body’s immune system. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pertuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving a HER2 directed dendritic cell vaccine, trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and chemotherapy may work better in participants with HER-2 positive breast cancer.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • A Study of the Efficacy and Safety of Atezolizumab Plus Chemotherapy for Patients With Early Relapsing Recurrent Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    This study will evaluate the efficacy and safety of atezolizumab plus chemotherapy compared with placebo plus chemotherapy in patients with inoperable recurrent triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC).
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania