Clinical Trials Using Cetuximab

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Cetuximab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 44
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  • Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab or Cetuximab and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2 / Neu Amplified Colorectal Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well trastuzumab and pertuzumab work compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with HER2 / neu amplified colorectal cancer that has spread from where it started to other places in the body (advanced / metastatic) and cannot be removed by surgery. Trastuzumab is a form of “targeted therapy” because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body’s immune system. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pertuzumab and cetuximab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trastuzumab and pertuzumab may work better compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with colorectal cancer.
    Location: 725 locations

  • Avelumab with or without Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Advanced Skin Squamous Cell Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well avelumab with or without cetuximab work in treating patients with skin squamous cell cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab and cetuximab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 302 locations

  • Radiation Therapy with Durvalumab or Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Who Cannot Take Cisplatin

    This phase II / III trial studies how well radiation therapy works with durvalumab or cetuximab in treating patients with head and neck cancer that has spread to a local and / or regional area of the body who cannot take cisplatin. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab or cetuximab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not known if radiation therapy with durvalumab will work better than the usual therapy of radiation therapy with cetuximab in treating patients with head and neck cancer.
    Location: 215 locations

  • A Study to Evaluate Ibrutinib Combination Therapy in Patients With Selected Gastrointestinal and Genitourinary Tumors

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of single agent ibrutinib or the combination treatments of ibrutinib with everolimus, paclitaxel, docetaxel, pembrolizumab or cetuximab in selected advanced gastrointestinal and genitourinary tumors.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Cabozantinib S-malate and Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of cabozantinib S-malate and when given together with cetuximab in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer that has come back after (recurrent) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Cabozantinib S-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cabozantinib S-malate and cetuximab may work better in treating patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell cancer.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Study of Monalizumab and Cetuximab in Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    The objective of this study is to evaluate in a 3 +3 design, the safety of escalating doses of Monalizumab given IV in combination with cetuximab in patients who have received prior systemic regimen(s) for recurrent and / or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Cohorts expansion will evaluate antitumor activity of monalizumab and cetuximab with or without anti-PD(L)1
    Location: 8 locations

  • Lenvatinib Mesylate and Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma or Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    This phase I / Ib trial studies the best dose and side effects of lenvatinib mesylate and cetuximab in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma or cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma that has come back (recurrent) or spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Lenvatinib mesylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving lenvatinib mesylate and cetuximab may work better in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma or cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Ficlatuzumab with or without Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Cetuximab-Resistant, Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well ficlatuzumab with or without cetuximab work in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that has come back (recurrent) or spread to other places in the body (metastatic) and resistant to cetuximab treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ficlatuzumab and cetuximab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 7 locations

  • A Study of CDX-3379 and Cetuximab and in Patients With Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    This is a study to determine the clinical benefit (how well the drug works), safety and tolerability of combining CDX-3379 and cetuximab. The study will enroll patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who have previously received cetuximab and progressed.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Palbociclib and Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of palbociclib when given together with cetuximab and to see how well they work in treating patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck that has spread to other parts of the body or has returned and cannot be removed by surgery. Palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving palbociclib and cetuximab may work better in treating patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.
    Location: 6 locations

  • GSK3359609 Plus Tremelimumab for the Treatment of Advanced Solid Tumors

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate if the combination of GSK3359609 and tremelimumab is safe and tolerable (Part 1) and provides significant survival benefit to subjects with relapsed / refractory (R / R) Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas (HNSCC) to warrant further clinical investigation (Part 2). Part 1 (dose escalation) will enroll subjects with advanced, selected solid tumors. Subjects will receive escalating doses of GSK3359609 and tremelimumab in combination in Part 1. Part 2 is randomized expansion and will enroll subjects with R / R HNSCC who have disease progression after receiving at least 1 platinum-based chemotherapy and at least 1 anti-programmed death receptor protein-1 (PD-1) / anti-programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) therapy, whether in combination or separately. In Part 2, subjects will be randomized in a ratio of 2:1 to receive either GSK3359609 in combination with tremelimumab at the recommended Phase 2 dose or investigators choice of a single-agent standard of care (SOC) therapy including paclitaxel, docetaxel or cetuximab. The total duration of subjects in the study will be approximately 4 years.
    Location: 5 locations

  • A Study of LY3214996 Administered Alone or in Combination With Other Agents in Participants With Advanced / Metastatic Cancer

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety of an extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1 / 2) inhibitor LY3214996 administered alone or in combination with other agents in participants with advanced cancer.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Photoimmunotherapy (PIT) Study in Recurrent Head / Neck Cancer for Patients Who Have Failed at Least Two Lines of Therapy

    This study will evaluate the efficacy and safety of ASP-1929 Photoimmunotherapy as a monotherapy for the treatment of locoregional, recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in patients who have failed or progressed on or after at least two lines of therapy.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Palbociclib and Cetuximab in Treating Participants with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer and Non-Mutated KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF Genes

    This phase II trial studies how well palbociclib and cetuximab work in treating participants with colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) and have the proteins KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF that are not genetically mutated (wild type). Palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving palbociclib and cetuximab together may work better in treating participants with wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Chemotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with HPV-Associated Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy work in treating patients with human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, cetuximab, carboplatin, and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving a lower dose of chemotherapy and radiation therapy may provide a similar cure rate as the longer, more intensive standard regimen.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Early Identification and Treatment of Occult Metastatic Disease in Stage III Colorectal Cancer

    This phase III trial studies how well either FOLFIRI (leucovorin, fluorouracil, and irinotecan), active surveillance, nivolumab, or encorafenib, binimetinib, and cetuximab work in decreasing recurrence (chance of the cancer coming back) in patients with stage III colorectal cancer who are ctDNA positive. If all the cancer is not killed after initial treatment, bloods tests may be able to detect tumor DNA in the blood called circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA). This is genetic material unique to the cancer that may be present in the blood stream and can be identified through a ctDNA blood test. Cancer researchers believe that ctDNA in the blood stream may be an indicator that cancer is more likely to recur. Chemotherapy drugs, such as leucovorin, fluorouracil, and irinotecan, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Nivolumab is an anti-PD-1 antibody. It works by attaching to and blocking a molecule called PD-1. PD-1 is a protein that is present on different types of cells in the immune system and controls parts of the immune system by shutting it down. Antibodies that block PD-1 can potentially prevent PD-1 from shutting down the immune system, thus potentially allowing immune cells to recognize and destroy cancer cells. Encorafenib in combination with binimetinib and cetuximab may target the BRAF V600E-mutation in colorectal cancer. When this mutation is present, it switches on pathway called the MAPK pathway which stimulates cell division and leads to uncontrolled cell growth. Encorafenib, binimetinib and cetuximab target different parts of this important signaling pathway in tumor cells with this mutation and may slow down their growth and communication. Encorafenib and binimetinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This study is being done to determine whether there are differences in cancer recurrence in ctDNA positive patients treated with additional therapy versus put on active surveillance.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Study of CC-95251, a Monoclonal Antibody Directed Against SIRPα, in Subjects With Advanced Solid and Hematologic Cancers

    Study CC-95251-ST-001 is an open-label, Phase 1, dose escalation (Part A) and expansion (Parts B and C), first-in-human clinical study of CC-95251 in subjects with advanced cancers.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Cetuximab and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Oral Cavity, Oropharyngeal, Paranasal Sinus, Hypopharyngeal, or Laryngeal Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and how well cetuximab and nivolumab work in treating patients with oral cavity, oropharyngeal, paranasal sinus, hypopharyngeal, or laryngeal cancer that have come back (recurrent) or spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Some tumors need growth factors, which are made by the body's white blood cells, to keep growing. Growth factor inhibitors, such as cetuximab may interfere with the growth factor and stop the tumor from growing.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Nab-paclitaxel with Cisplatin or Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Stage III-IVb Head and Neck Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nab-paclitaxel with cisplatin or cetuximab works in treating patients with stage III-IVb head and neck cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving monoclonal antibody therapy with chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells than chemotherapy alone.
    Location: 3 locations

  • TPST-1120 as Monotherapy and in Combination With (Nivolumab, Docetaxel or Cetuximab) in Subjects With Advanced Cancers

    This is a phase 1 / 1b open label, multicenter dose escalation and dose expansion study to investigate the safety, tolerability and anti-tumor activity of TPST-1120, a small molecule selective antagonist of PPARα (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha) as monotherapy and in combination with other systemic anticancer agents including nivolumab, an anti-PD1 antibody, docetaxel, a cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agent and cetuximab, an anti-EGFR antibody in subjects with advanced solid tumors.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Pembrolizumab and Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and cetuximab work in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that has come back or spread to other places in the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab and cetuximab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 4 locations

  • A Study Evaluating Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Therapeutic Activity of RO6874281 as a Single Agent (Part A) or in Combination With Trastuzumab or Cetuximab (Part B or C)

    This first-in-human, open-label, multicenter, Phase Ia / Ib, adaptive, multiple ascending-dose study will evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and preliminary anti-tumor activity of RO6874281 as a single agent (Part A) or in combination with trastuzumab or cetuximab (Part B or C).
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cetuximab and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Stage III-IV Head and Neck Cancer

    This early phase I pilot trial studies cetuximab and radiation therapy in treating patients with stage III-IV head and neck cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Radiation therapy uses high energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving cetuximab or cisplatin together with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Cetuximab with or without Docetaxel in Treating Patients with Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer Previously Treated with Radiation Therapy

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well stereotactic radiosurgery and cetuximab with docetaxel work compared with stereotactic radiosurgery and cetuximab alone in treating patients with head and neck cancer previously treated with radiation therapy that has come back after a period of improvement (recurrent). Stereotactic radiosurgery, also called stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), is a type of external radiation therapy technique where the tumor is precisely localized and a very large amount of radiation is delivered to the tumor. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, may block the growth of tumor cells by targeting a certain protein that regulates tumor growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving stereotactic radiosurgery and cetuximab with or without docetaxel is more effective in killing tumor cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Study of LY3499446 in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors With KRAS G12C Mutation

    The reason for this study is to see if the study drug LY3499446 is safe and effective in participants with solid tumors with KRAS G12C mutation.
    Location: 3 locations


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