Clinical Trials Using Cetuximab

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Cetuximab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-44 of 44

  • Encorafenib, Cetuximab, and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Microsatellite Stable, BRAFV600E Mutated Unresectable or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of encorafenib, cetuximab, and nivolumab and how well they work together in treating patients with microsatellite stable, BRAFV600E gene mutated colorectal cancer that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Encorafenib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab and nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving encorafenib, cetuximab, and nivolumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer compared to cetuximab alone.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    This phase II trial studies how well cetuximab works in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Porfimer Sodium Interstitial Photodynamic Therapy with or without Standard of Care Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of interstitial photodynamic therapy and to see how well it works with standard of care chemotherapy in treating patients with head and neck cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (locally advanced) or that has come back (recurrent). Interstitial photodynamic therapy uses a light-sensitive drug called porfimer sodium. This drug is activated by laser light delivered through special fibers into the tumor. It is not yet known how well porfimer sodium interstitial photodynamic therapy works, with or without standard of care chemotherapy, in treating patients with head and neck cancer.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Ibrutinib and Cetuximab or Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well ibrutinib works with cetuximab or nivolumab in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that has come back or has spread to other places in the body. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab and nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving ibrutinib with cetuximab or nivolumab may work better in treating patients with head and neck cancer.
    Location: University of California San Diego, San Diego, California

  • Avelumab, Palbociclib, and Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of palbociclib, when given together with avelumab and cetuximab, in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer that has come back or spread to other parts of the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab and cetuximab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving avelumab, palbociclib, and cetuximab may work better in treating patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell cancer.
    Location: University of California San Diego, San Diego, California

  • Study of Neratinib +Trastuzumab or Neratinib + Cetuximab in Patients With KRAS / NRAS / BRAF / PIK3CA Wild-Type Metastatic Colorectal Cancer by HER2 Status

    This is a phase II trial to examine the efficacy of neratinib plus trastuzumab or neratinib plus cetuximab in patients with "quadruple wild-type" (all RAS / NRAS / BRAF / PIK3CA wild-type), metastatic colorectal cancer based on HER2 status (amplified, non-amplified [wild-type] or mutated). Patients must have confirmed quadruple wild-type (WT) genotype, via NSABP MPR-1 or from colonic biopsy or a metastatic biopsy taken prior to treatment, and known HER2 status.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Palbociclib and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy with Cisplatin or Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well palbociclib and intensity-modulated radiation therapy with cisplatin or cetuximab works in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer. Palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Intensity-modulation radiation therapy uses varying intensities of radiation beams to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors, thereby reducing the damage to nearby healthy tissue. It is not yet known whether giving palbociclib and intensity-modulated radiation therapy with cisplatin or cetuximab works better at treating head and neck squamous cell cancer.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Utomilumab, Cetuximab, and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of irinotecan hydrochloride when given with utomilumab and cetuximab in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as utomilumab and cetuximab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving utomilumab, cetuximab, and irinotecan hydrochloride may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Afatinib Dimaleate and Cetuximab as Second-Line Treatment in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well afatinib dimaleate and cetuximab work as second-line treatment in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer that has come back or has spread to other parts of the body. Afatinib dimaleate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving afatinib dimaleate and cetuximab may work better in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Study of NC-6004 in Combination With 5-FU and Cetuximab in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    NC-6004 is a polymeric micelle containing cisplatin as an active moiety. The nanoparticle provides sustained release of the active moiety and utilizes the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect to target release of platinum to tumors. This Phase I study aims to establish a recommended dose (RD) for the triplet combination of NC-6004 plus 5-FU and cetuximab as first-line treatment in patient with recurrent and / or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck for further clinical study development.
    Location: University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

  • A Study Evaluating Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Therapeutic Activity of RO6874281 as a Single Agent (Part A) or in Combination With Trastuzumab or Cetuximab (Part B or C)

    This first-in-human, open-label, multicenter, Phase Ia / Ib, adaptive, multiple ascending-dose study will evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and preliminary anti-tumor activity of RO6874281 as a single agent (Part A) or in combination with trastuzumab or cetuximab (Part B or C).
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cetuximab before Surgery in Treating Patients with Aggressive Locally Advanced Skin Cancer

    This phase I pilot trial studies the side effects and how well cetuximab before surgery works in treating patients with skin cancer that forms, grows, and spreads quickly and has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, may block tumor growth in different ways be targeting certain cells. Giving cetuximab before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey

  • Radiation Therapy with Cisplatin or Docetaxel and Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Stage III-IVB Head and Neck Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well radiation therapy in combination with cisplatin or docetaxel and cetuximab works in treating patients with stage III-IVB head and neck cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Docetaxel is designed to stop the growth of cancer cells, which may cause the cells to die. It may also damage blood vessels in tumor tissue. Cetuximab is designed to prevent or slow down the growth of cancer cells by blocking proteins inside the cancer cell, called the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Cisplatin has a platinum atom at its center. The platinum may poison the cancer cells, which may cause them to die. It is not yet known whether radiation therapy is more effective when given with cisplatin or docetaxel and cetuximab in treating patients with head and neck cancer.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Bevacizumab and Temsirolimus Alone or in Combination with Valproic Acid or Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Malignancy or Other Benign Disease

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of bevacizumab and temsirolimus alone or in combination with valproic acid or cetuximab in treating patients with a malignancy that has spread to other places in the body or other disease that is not cancerous. Immunotherapy with bevacizumab and cetuximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Temsirolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as valproic acid, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether bevacizumab and temsirolimus work better when given alone or with valproic acid or cetuximab in treating patients with a malignancy or other disease that is not cancerous.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Alpelisib, Cetuximab, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients with HPV-Associated Oropharyngeal Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best way to give alpelisib, cetuximab, and cisplatin and to see how well these drugs work in treating patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as alpelisib and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Giving alpelisib, cisplatin, and cetuximab together may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Nilotinib and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Can Be Treated With Cetuximab

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of nilotinib when given together with cetuximab in treating patients with solid tumors that can be treated with cetuximab. Nilotinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Giving nilotinib and cetuximab may be an effective treatment for solid tumors.
    Location: MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia

  • Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab or Cetuximab and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2 / Neu Amplified Colorectal Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well trastuzumab and pertuzumab work compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with HER2 / neu amplified colorectal cancer that has spread from where it started to other places in the body (advanced / metastatic) and cannot be removed by surgery. Trastuzumab is a form of “targeted therapy” because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body’s immune system. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pertuzumab and cetuximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trastuzumab and pertuzumab may work better compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with colorectal cancer.
    Location: 640 locations

  • Cetuximab and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Stage III-IV Head and Neck Cancer

    This early phase I pilot trial studies cetuximab and radiation therapy in treating patients with stage III-IV head and neck cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Radiation therapy uses high energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving cetuximab or cisplatin together with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Radiation Therapy with Cisplatin, Docetaxel, or Cetuximab and Docetaxel after Surgery in Treating Patients with High-Risk Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies how well radiation therapy works when given together with cisplatin, docetaxel or cetuximab and docetaxel after surgery in treating patients with high-risk stage III-IV head and neck cancer the begins in the thin, flat cells (squamous cell). Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin and docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Cetuximab may block the growth of tumor cells by blocking a protein and many other tumor cells functions. It is not yet known whether radiation therapy is more effective when given with cisplatin, docetaxel, or cetuximab and docetaxel.
    Location: 172 locations