Clinical Trials Using Decitabine

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Decitabine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 43
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  • Azacitidine with or without Nivolumab or Midostaurin, or Decitabine and Cytarabine Alone in Treating Older Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies how well azacitidine with or without nivolumab or midostaurin, or decitabine and cytarabine alone work in treating older patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, decitabine, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Midostaurin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving azacitidine with or without nivolumab or midostaurin, or decitabine and cytarabine alone may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 143 locations

  • Entospletinib Monotherapy and in Combination With Chemotherapy in Adults With Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

    This study will evaluate the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of entospletinib (GS-9973) when administered as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy in adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
    Location: 11 locations

  • Phase 3 Randomized, Open-Label Study of Guadecitabine vs Treatment Choice in Previously Treated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group study of guadecitabine vs treatment choice (TC). Subjects will be randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either guadecitabine or TC. TC options include the 8 high or low intensity, locally available regimens below; or Best supportive Care (BSC) alone: - High intensity (intermediate or high dose cytarabine [HiDAC]; mitoxantrone, etoposide, and cytarabine [MEC]; or fludarabine, cytarabine, granulocyte colony stimulating factor [G-CSF], + / - idarubicin [FLAG / FLAG-Ida]). - Low intensity (low dose cytarabine [LDAC], decitabine, or azacitidine). - BSC.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ipilimumab when given together with decitabine in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as decitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ipilimumab and decitabine may work better in treating patients with relapsed or refractory myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Ruxolitinib Phosphate and Decitabine in Treating Patients with Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of ruxolitinib phosphate when given together with decitabine and to see how well they work in treating patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms, a group of diseases of the bone marrow in which excess cells are produced. Ruxolitinib phosphate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking one of the proteins needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as decitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ruxolitinib phosphate with decitabine may be an effective treatment for myeloproliferative neoplasms.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Azacitidine or Decitabine in Epigenetic Priming in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well azacitidine or decitabine work in epigenetic priming in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. Azacitidine and decitabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Low Dose Decitabine, Low Dose Azacitidine, or Standard Dose Azacitidine in Treating Patients with Transfusion-Dependent Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Best Supportive Care in Patients with Transfusion-Independent Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well low dose decitabine, low dose azacitidine, or standard dose azacitidine works in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) who need blood transfusion (transfusion-dependent) compared to best supportive care in patients with MDS who do not need blood transfusion (transfusion-independent). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as decitabine and azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether low dose decitabine, low dose azacitidine, or standard dose azacitidine is most effective in treating or offering best supportive care for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Study of Biomarker-Based Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This screening and multi-sub-study Phase 1b / 2 trial will establish a method for genomic screening followed by assigning and accruing simultaneously to a multi-study "Master Protocol (BMAL-16-001-M1)." The specific subtype of acute myeloid leukemia will determine which sub-study, within this protocol, a participant will be assigned to evaluate investigational therapies or combinations with the ultimate goal of advancing new targeted therapies for approval. The study also includes a marker negative sub-study which will include all screened patients not eligible for any of the biomarker-driven sub-studies.
    Location: 6 locations

  • A Study of the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Venetoclax in Pediatric and Young Adult Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Malignancies

    An open-label, global, multi-center study to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of venetoclax monotherapy, to determine the dose limiting toxicity (DLT) and the recommended Phase 2 dose (RPTD), and to assess the preliminary efficacy of venetoclax in pediatric and young adult participants with relapsed or refractory malignancies.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Efficacy Study of Inecalcitol With Decitabine in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients Unfit for Standard Chemotherapy

    Evaluate the effect of the addition of inecalcitol to decitabine treatment on overall survival in previously untreated AML patients aged 65 years or more who are randomly assigned to receive decitabine with or without inecalcitol.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Trial to Find and Investigate a Safe Dose of BI 836858 in Combination With Decitabine for Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

    Phase I Dose Escalation: Primary objective is to determine the MTD and the recommended dose for Phase I Extension. Secondary objective is to investigate the safety, pharmacokinetics and efficacy of BI 836858 in combination with decitabine Phase I Extension: Primary objective is to collect additional data on safety, pharmacokinetics and efficacy and to define the Recommended Phase II Dose (RP2D) of BI 836858 in combination with decitabine. Phase II: Primary objective is to investigate efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of BI 836858 in combination with decitabine compared to decitabine monotherapy.
    Location: 3 locations

  • MUC1-Targeted Peptide GO-203-2C with or without Decitabine in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of mucin 1 (MUC1)-targeted peptide GO-203-2C and to see how well it works when given alone or together with decitabine in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as MUC1-targeted peptide GO-203-2C and decitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome before Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This randomized clinical trial studies different chemotherapies in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome before donor stem cell transplant. Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells, and may prevent the myelodysplastic syndrome from coming back after the transplant. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Study of PDR001 and / or MBG453 in Combination With Decitabine in Patients With AML or High Risk MDS

    To characterize the safety and tolerability of PDR001 and / or MBG453 in combination with decitabine in relapsed / refractory AML patients, de novo AML patients who are not candidates for standard induction therapy, or high risk MDS patients, and to identify recommended doses for future studies.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Pembrolizumab, Decitabine, and Tetrahydrouridine in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Non-small Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase I / II trials studies the side effects and best dose of decitabine and tetrahydrouridine and how well they work when given together with pembrolizumab in treating patients with non-small lung cancer that has spread to other parts in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Decitabine and tetrahydrouridine may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab, decitabine, and tetrahydrouridine may work better in treating patients with non-small lung cancer.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Cytarabine, Idarubicin, Liposome-encapsulated Daunorubicin-Cytarabine or Decitabine in Treating Older Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase II trial studies how well cytarabine and idarubicin or decitabine work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cytarabine, idarubicin and liposome-encapsulated daunorubicin-cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Decitabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving patients cytarabine, idarubicin, liposome-encapsulated daunorubicin-cytarabine or decitabine may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome based on clinicogenetic risk stratification.
    Location: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska

  • Recombinant EphB4-HSA Fusion Protein and Azacitidine or Decitabine in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Previously Treated with a Hypomethylating Agent

    This pilot phase II trial studies the side effects of recombinant EphB4-HSA fusion protein when given together with azacitidine or decitabine in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, or acute myeloid leukemia that has come back or has not responded to previous treatment with a hypomethylating agent. Recombinant EphB4-HSA fusion protein may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Hypomethylating agents, such as azacitidine and decitabine, slow down genes that promote cell growth and can kill cells that are dividing rapidly. Giving recombinant EphB4-HSA fusion protein together with azacitidine or decitabine may work better in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, or acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: USC / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Digoxin and Decitabine in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnose, Relapsed, or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This randomized phase Ib / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of digoxin and how well it works when given together with decitabine in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that is newly diagnosed, has come back, or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as digoxin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Decitabine may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Given digoxin and decitabine may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • STAT Inhibitor OPB-111077 and Decitabine in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia That Is Refractory, Relapsed, or Newly Diagnosed and Ineligible for Intensive Chemotherapy

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of STAT inhibitor OPB-111077 when given together with decitabine in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that does not respond to treatment, has come back, or is newly diagnosed and ineligible for intensive chemotherapy. STAT inhibitor OPB-111077 and decitabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Decitabine in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well decitabine works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Decitabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Genetically Modified T Cells and Decitabine in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of genetically modified T cells and decitabine in treating patients with ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer that has come back or has not responded to previous treatments. White blood cells called T cells are collected via a process called leukapheresis, genetically modified to recognize and attack tumor cells, then given back to the patient. Decitabine may induce and increase the amount of the target protein NY-ESO-1 available on the surface of tumor cells. Giving genetically modified T cells and decitabine may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Pevonedistat and Decitabine in Treating Patients with High Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of pevonedistat when given together with decitabine in treating patients with high risk acute myeloid leukemia. Pevonedistat and decitabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes need for cell growth.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Decitabine and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer, Soft Tissue Sarcoma, or Bone Sarcoma

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of decitabine when given together with gemcitabine hydrochloride in treating patients with pancreatic cancer, soft tissue sarcoma, or bone sarcoma that has spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as decitabine and gemcitabine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Pembrolizumab, Decitabine, and Standard Chemotherapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and decitabine prior to standard chemotherapy before surgery changes the infiltration of lymphocytes into HER2-negative breast cancers that are large and / or have spread to lymph nodes. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may improve the ability of lymphocytes to attack and kill tumor cells. Decitabine may increase the immune response to tumor cells by changing antigens on the tumor cells and by decreasing immunosuppressive cells in the tumor. Giving pembrolizumab and decitabine with chemotherapy may work better than chemotherapy alone in treating patients with HER2-negative breast cancer.
    Location: Virginia Commonwealth University / Massey Cancer Center, Richmond, Virginia

  • Decitabine, Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of decitabine when given together with filgrastim, cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that is newly diagnosed, has come back, or has not responded to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as decitabine, cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim, may increase the production of blood cells and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. Decitabine, filgrastim, cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington


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