Clinical Trials Using Dexamethasone

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Dexamethasone. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 137
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  • Bortezomib or Carfilzomib with Lenalidomide and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    This randomized phase III trial studies bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone to see how well they work compared to carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone in treating patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Bortezomib and carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Lenalidomide may help the immune system kill abnormal blood cells or cancer cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone are more or less effective than carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma
    Location: 793 locations

  • Ixazomib Citrate, Lenalidomide, Dexamethasone, and Zoledronic Acid or Zoledronic Acid Alone after Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Solitary Plasmacytoma of Bone

    This randomized phase III trial compares ixazomib citrate, lenalidomide, dexamethasone and zoledronic acid with zoledronic acid alone to see how well they work when given after radiation therapy in treating patients with solitary plasmacytoma of bone. Ixazomib citrate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Lenalidomide may help the immune system kill abnormal blood cells or cancer cells. Dexamethasone is a drug used in chemotherapy that may cause tumor cells to die. Zoledronic acid may prevent bone fractures and reduce bone pain, and may also improve survival. Standard treatment for this cancer is radiation therapy alone. It is not yet known whether ixazomib citrate, lenalidomide, dexamethasone and zoledronic acid or zoledronic acid alone is more effective, and whether adding these treatments after radiation therapy is more effective than radiation therapy alone in treating patients with solitary plasmacytoma of bone.
    Location: 368 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy with or without Blinatumomab in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed BCR-ABL-Negative B Lineage Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies combination chemotherapy with blinatumomab to see how well it works compared to induction chemotherapy alone in treating patients with newly diagnosed breakpoint cluster region (BCR)-c-abl oncogene 1, non-receptor tyrosine kinase (ABL)-negative B lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without blinatumomab in treating newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 378 locations

  • Risk-Adapted Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients with Newly Diagnosed Standard-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Localized B-Lineage Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This partially randomized phase III trial studies the side effects of different combinations of risk-adapted chemotherapy regimens and how well they work in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed standard-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia or B-lineage lymphoblastic lymphoma that is found only in the tissue or organ where it began (localized). Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy), giving the drugs in different doses, and giving the drugs in different combinations may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 197 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients with Newly Diagnosed High-Risk B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Ph-Like TKI Sensitive Mutations

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy works in treating young patients with newly diagnosed B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that is likely to come back or spread, and in patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-like tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) sensitive mutations. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) and giving the drugs in different doses and in different combinations may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 195 locations

  • Blinatumomab in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well blinatumomab works compared with standard combination chemotherapy in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed). Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether standard combination chemotherapy is more effective than blinatumomab in treating relapsed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 161 locations

  • Azacitidine and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Infants with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and KMT2A Gene Rearrangement

    This pilot phase II trial studies the side effects of azacitidine and combination chemotherapy in infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and KMT2A gene rearrangement. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, prednisolone, daunorubicin hydrochloride, cytarabine, dexamethasone, vincristine sulfate, pegaspargase, hydrocortisone sodium succinate, azacitidine, cyclophosphamide, mercaptopurine, leucovorin calcium, and thioguanine work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 152 locations

  • Tretinoin and Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients with Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    This phase III trial studies tretinoin and arsenic trioxide in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia. Standard treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia involves high doses of a common class of chemotherapy drugs called anthracyclines, which are known to cause long-term side effects, especially to the heart. Tretinoin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Arsenic trioxide may stop the growth of cancer cells by either killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Completely removing or reducing the amount of anthracycline chemotherapy and giving tretinoin together with arsenic trioxide may be an effective treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia and may reduce some of the long-term side effects.
    Location: 142 locations

  • Brentuximab Vedotin or Crizotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well brentuximab vedotin or crizotinib and combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage II-IV anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Monoclonal antibody-drug conjugates, such as brentuximab vedotin, can block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Crizotinib and methotrexate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether brentuximab vedotin and combination chemotherapy is more effective than crizotinib and combination chemotherapy in treating anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
    Location: 143 locations

  • Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 81 locations

  • Standard-Dose Lenalidomide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone or High-Dose Lenalidomide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    This randomized phase III trial studies standard-dose lenalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone (RVD) to see how well it works compared to high-dose RVD followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT) in treating patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Giving RVD before a PBSCT may help stop the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing, killing them, blocking the enzymes needed for cell growth, or stimulating the immune system. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient’s blood and stored. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by RVD combination therapy. It is not yet known whether standard-dose RVD is more effective than high-dose RVD followed by PBSCT in treating MM.
    Location: 48 locations

  • Study Comparing Daratumumab, Lenalidomide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone (D-RVd) Versus Lenalidomide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone (RVd) in Subjects With Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    The purpose of this study is to determine if the addition of daratumumab to lenalidomide-bortezomib-dexamethasone (RVd) will increase the proportion of participants achieving stringent complete response (sCR), as defined by the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) criteria, by the time of completion of post autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) consolidation treatment, compared with RVd alone.
    Location: 30 locations

  • A Phase 2 Study of Ruxolitinib With Chemotherapy in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This is a nonrandomized study of ruxolitinib in combination with a standard multi-agent chemotherapy regimen for the treatment of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Part 1 of the study will optimize the dose of study drug (ruxolitinib) in combination with the chemotherapy regimen. Part 2 will evaluate the efficacy of combination chemotherapy and ruxolitinib at the recommended dose determined in Part 1.
    Location: 17 locations

  • Selinexor Treatment of Refractory Myeloma

    This is a Phase 2b, single-arm, open-label, multicenter study of selinexor 80 mg plus dexamethasone 20 mg (Sd) dosed twice weekly in four-week cycles, in patients with penta-refractory MM (Parts 1 and 2) or quad refractory MM (Part 1 only).
    Location: 18 locations

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Frontline Chemotherapy in Treating Young Adults with Newly Diagnosed B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This partially randomized phase III trial studies the side effects of inotuzumab ozogamicin and how well it works when given with frontline chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Monoclonal antibodies, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin with chemotherapy may work better in treating young adults with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Ixazomib, Lenalidomide, and Dexamethasone as Consolidation Therapy Followed by Maintenance Ixazomib or Lenalidomide after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well ixazomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone as consolidation therapy followed by maintenance ixazomib or lenalidomide after stem cell transplant works in treating patients with multiple myeloma. Ixazomib and lenalidomide may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ixazomib with lenalidomide and dexamethasone as consolidation therapy may help prolong the amount of time patients are disease-free after a stem cell transplant. It is not yet known whether giving ixazomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone followed by maintenance ixazomib or lenalidomide works better in treating patients with multiple myeloma after a stem cell transplant.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Idasanutlin, Ixazomib Citrate, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of idasanutlin and ixazomib citrate when given together with dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has returned after a period of improvement. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as idasanutlin and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Ixazomib citrate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving idasanutlin, ixazomib citrate, and dexamethasone together may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Study of Dexamethasone Plus IXAZOMIB (MLN9708) or Physicians Choice of Treatment in Relapsed or Refractory Systemic Light Chain (AL) Amyloidosis

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether dexamethasone plus IXAZOMIB improves hematologic response, 2-year vital organ (that is, heart or kidney) deterioration and mortality rate versus a physician's choice of a chemotherapy regimen in participants diagnosed with relapsed or refractory systemic light chain (AL) amyloidosis.
    Location: 8 locations

  • A Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Daratumumab in Combination With Cyclophosphamide, Bortezomib and Dexamethasone (CyBorD) Compared to CyBorD Alone in Newly Diagnosed Systemic Amyloid Light-chain (AL) Amyloidosis

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of daratumumab plus cyclophosphamide, bortezomib and dexamethasone (CyBorD) compared with CyBorD alone in treatment of newly diagnosed amyloid light chain (AL) amyloidosis participants.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Risk Classification Schemes in Identifying Better Treatment Options for Children and Adolescents with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies risk classification schemes in identifying better treatment options for children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Risk factor classification may help identify how strong treatment should be for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Study of Carfilzomib in Combination With Induction Chemotherapy in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    The purpose of the study is to determine the maximum tolerated dose and assess the safety, tolerability and activity of carfilzomib, alone and in combination with induction chemotherapy, in children with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
    Location: 8 locations

  • Daratumumab, Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Newly-Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well daratumumab, carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone work in treating patients with newly-diagnosed multiple myeloma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as daratumumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving daratumumab, carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Panitumumab and Combination Chemotherapy with or without Hepatic Arterial Infusion in Treating Patients with Wild Type RAS Colorectal Cancer Metastatic in the Liver That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well panitumumab and combination chemotherapy with or without hepatic arterial infusion work in treating patients with wild type RAS colorectal cancer that has spread to the liver and cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as panitumumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as floxuridine, dexamethasone, leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, and irinotecan, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Hepatic arterial infusion uses a catheter to carry tumor-killing substances directly into the liver. Giving panitumumab and combination chemotherapy with or without hepatic arterial infusion may kill more tumor cells and allow patients to have liver tumors removed surgically.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Newly-Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of carfilzomib when given together with lenalidomide and dexamethasone and to see how well they work in treating patients with newly-diagnosed multiple myeloma. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving carfilzomib together with lenalidomide and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with newly-diagnosed multiple myeloma.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Selinexor, Ixazomib Citrate, and Low Dose Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of selinexor when given together with ixazomib citrate and low dose dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or has not responded to treatment. Selinexor and ixazomib citrate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving selinexor, ixazomib citrate, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 6 locations


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