Clinical Trials Using Etoposide

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Etoposide. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 76-100 of 119

  • Rituximab Hyaluronidase in Combination with Chemotherapy in Treating Aggressive B-cell Lymphoma in Uganda

    This phase I trial studies how well rituximab hyaluronidase and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients in Uganda with Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, or Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus associated multicentric Castleman disease. Rituximab hyaluronidase is a combination of rituximab and hyaluronidase. Rituximab binds to a molecule called CD20, which is found on B cells (a type of white blood cell) and some types of cancer cells. This may help the immune system kill cancer cells. Hyaluronidase allows rituximab to be given by injection under the skin. Giving rituximab and hyaluronidase by injection under the skin is faster than giving rituximab alone by infusion into the blood. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine, methotrexate, etoposide, doxorubicin, and prednisone work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. While rituximab has a clear survival benefit in patients within developed countries, differences in supportive care and infectious co-morbidities require special attention. Giving rituximab hyaluronidase alone or in combination with chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, or Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus associated multicentric Castleman disease compared to chemotherapy alone in Uganda.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Isatuximab in Combination With Chemotherapy in Pediatric Patients With Relapsed / Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Primary Objective: To evaluate the anti-leukemic activity of isatuximab in combination with standard chemotherapies in pediatric participants of ages 28 days to less than 18 years with Relapsed / Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) or Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Secondary Objectives: - Safety and tolerability assessments - Assessment of infusion reactions (IRs) - Pharmacokinetics (PK) of isatuximab - Minimal residual disease - Overall response rate - Overall survival - Event free survival - Duration of response - Relationship between clinical effects and CD38 receptor density and occupancy
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Mitoxantrone, Etoposide, and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients with Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of mitoxantrone, etoposide, and gemtuzumab ozogamicin and to see how well they work in treating patients acute myeloid leukemia that does not respond to initial standard induction therapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitoxantrone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Etoposide may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, gemtuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Gemtuzumab attaches to CD33 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. This study is being done to see if the combination of mitoxantone, etoposide, and gemtuzumab ozogamicin improves the response rate in patients with acute myeloid leukemia that did not respond after a course of induction chemotherapy.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Nivolumab with DA-REPOCH Chemotherapy Regimen in Treating Patients with Aggressive B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab works with the DA-REPOCH chemotherapy regimen in treating patients with aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dose-adjusted rituximab, etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride (DA-REPOCH), work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab with DA-REPOCH may work better in treating patients with aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Venetoclax in Combination with BEAM Chemotherapy Regimen in Treating Patients with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of venetoclax when given in combination with standard chemotherapy regimen in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma undergoing stem cell transplant. Venetoclax may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known how well venetoclax works when given with standard chemotherapy in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma undergoing stem cell transplant.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Pembrolizumab with Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Participants with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Small Cell / Neuroendocrine Cancers of Urothelium or Prostate

    This phase Ib trial studies how well pembrolizumab works with combination chemotherapy in treating participants with small cell / neuroendocrine cancers of the urothelium or prostate that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, docetaxel, cisplatin, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab with platinum-based chemotherapy may work better in treating participants with small cell / neuroendocrine cancers of the urothelium or prostate.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Donor Natural Killer Cells, Cyclophosphamide, and Etoposide in Treating Children and Young Adults with Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of cord blood-derived expanded allogeneic natural killer cells (donor natural killer [NK] cells) and how well they work when given together with cyclophosphamide and etoposide in treating children and young adults with solid tumors that have come back (relapsed) or that do not respond to treatment (refractory). NK cells, white blood cells important to the immune system, are donated / collected from cord blood collected at birth from healthy babies and grown in the lab. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving NK cells together with cyclophosphamide and etoposide may work better in treating children and young adults with solid tumors.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Lymphoblastic Lymphoma, Burkitt Lymphoma / Leukemia, or Double-Hit Lymphoma / Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, lymphoblastic lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma / leukemia, or double-hit lymphoma / leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as clofarabine, etoposide, cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate liposome, dexamethasone and bortezomib, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Chemotherapy with or without Total Body Irradiation before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy with or without total body irradiation before stem cell transplantation works in treating patients with Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy, such as total body irradiation, uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. It is not known whether chemotherapy with or without total body irradiation before stem cell transplant works better in treating patients with Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin (DA-EPOCH) works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Umbilical Cord Blood NK Cells, Rituximab, High-Dose Chemotherapy, and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of cord blood-derived expanded allogeneic natural killer cells (umbilical cord blood natural killer [NK] cells), rituximab, high-dose chemotherapy, and stem cell transplant in treating patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that has come back (recurrent) or that does not respond to treatment (refractory). Immune system cells, such as cord blood-derived expanded allogeneic natural killer cells, are made by the body to attack foreign or cancerous cells. Immunotherapy with rituximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carmustine, cytarabine, etoposide, lenalidomide, melphalan, and rituximab, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. A stem cell transplant using stem cells from the patient or a donor may be able to replace blood-forming cells that were destroyed by chemotherapy used to kill cancer cells. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Giving cord blood-derived expanded allogeneic natural killer cells, rituximab, high-dose chemotherapy, and stem cell transplant may work better in treating patients with recurrent or refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Lenalidomide Combined With Modified DA-EPOCH and Rituximab (EPOCH-R2) in Primary Effusion Lymphoma or KSHV-associated Large Cell Lymphoma

    Background: Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare disease with no standard treatment. Researchers want to see if a drug called lenalidomide along with common chemotherapy drugs may be effective in treating PEL. Objective: To test a new treatment for PEL. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with PEL. Design: Participants will be screened with blood tests, imaging studies, a physical exam, and other tests. Participants will have tests to evaluate their disease. These may include: Blood tests Scans Lumbar puncture. Fluid around the spinal cord will be removed with a needle. Bone marrow removed with a needle and studied Samples of skin or lymph nodes removed Fluid removed from around organs Lung and eye tests Tubes with cameras taking pictures of airways or digestive tract Participants will take lenalidomide pills for 10 days. They will keep a pill diary. Participants will have a catheter (small tube) placed in the large vein in the arm or chest. Participants will get DA-EPOCH-R as intravenous infusions by catheter over several days. This will be repeated in 21-day cycles. Most participants will have 6 cycles. Participants will get the drug filgrastim by injection under the skin. They will get the drug methotrexate injected into the spinal fluid. During the study, participants will have the following tests done at least once: Medical history Physical exam Blood, urine, and stool tests Lesions photographed and measured Lumbar puncture Participants will have follow-up visits for 5 years. They will repeat the screening tests plus have urine and stool tested. Participants may be contacted later by phone to see how they are doing.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Safety and Pharmacokinetics (PK) of Escalating Doses of Tiragolumab as a Single Agent and in Combination With Atezolizumab and / or Other Anti-Cancer Therapies in Locally Advanced or Metastatic Tumors

    This first-in-human open-label, multicenter, dose-escalation and expansion study is designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and PK of tiragolumab alone or in combination with atezolizumab and / or other anti-cancer therapies in participants with locally advanced, recurrent, or metastatic incurable tumors for whom standard therapy does not exist, has proven to be ineffective or intolerable, or is considered inappropriate, or for whom a clinical trial of an investigational agent is a recognized standard of care.
    Location: 5 locations

  • High-Dose Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    This phase II trial studies how well high-dose, or myeloablative, chemotherapy and stem cell transplant works in treating patients with neuroblastoma that is at high risk of spreading. Myeloablative chemotherapy uses high doses of chemotherapy to kill cells in the bone marrow, both cancer cells and healthy cells. Healthy stem cells from the patient that were collected before chemotherapy are then returned to the patient in a stem cell transplant to replace the cells that were killed by chemotherapy. Myeloablative chemotherapy and stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for patients with high-risk neuroblastoma.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Alemtuzumab or Tocilizumab in Combination with Etoposide and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

    This phase II trial studies how well alemtuzumab or tocilizumab in combination with etoposide and dexamethasone work in treating patients with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a disorder that causes abnormal over activity of the immune system. Immunosuppressive therapy, using drugs such as alemtuzumab, tocilizumab, etoposide, and dexamethasone, may decrease the body’s immune system activity and prevent the immune system from causing damage to organs.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • MRI-Guided Laser Heat Ablation in Treating Younger Patients with Brain Tumors

    This pilot phase II trial studies magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided laser heat ablation in treating younger patients with brain tumors. MRI-guided laser ablation (MLA) is a minimally invasive laser surgery that uses a small incision in the scalp and skull, through which a thin laser probe is inserted and guided by MR imaging to the core of a tumor mass where it delivers hyperthermic ablation. MLA may disrupt the blood brain barrier, a separation of circulating blood from the fluid of the nervous system, which may improve delivery of the chemotherapy drugs to the brain.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Study of Palifermin (Kepivance) in Persons Undergoing Unrelated Donor Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Background: - In allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), stem cells are taken from a donor and given to a recipient. Sometimes the recipient s immune system destroys the donor s cells. Or donor immune cells attack the recipient s tissues, called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). This is less likely when the recipient and donor have similar human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Researchers want to see if the drug palifermin improves the results of allogeneic SCT from HLA-matched unrelated donors. Objective: - To see if high doses of palifermin before chemotherapy are safe, prevent chronic GVHD, and improve immune function after transplant. Eligibility: - Adults 18 years of age or older with blood or bone marrow cancer with no HLA-matched sibling, but with a possible HLA-matched donor. Design: - Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, and blood and urine tests. They will have scans and heart and lung exams. - Before transplant, participants will: - Have many tests and exams. These include blood tests throughout the study and bone marrow biopsy. - Get a central line catheter if they do not have one. - Have 1-3 rounds of chemotherapy. - Take more tests to make sure they can have the transplant, including medical history, physical exam, and CT scan. - Get palifermin by IV and more chemotherapy. They will get other drugs, some they will take for 6 months. - Participants will get the SCT. - After transplant, participants will: - Be hospitalized at least 3-4 weeks. - Have tests for GVHD at 60 days and 6 months. These include mouth and skin photos and biopsies. - Stay near D.C. for 3 months. - Visit NIH 5 times the first 2 years, then yearly. They may have scans and biopsies.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Dose Adjusted EPOCH Regimen in Combination with Ofatumumab or Rituximab in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed or Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well a dose adjusted regimen consisting of etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride (EPOCH) works in combination with ofatumumab or rituximab in treating patients with Burkitt lymphoma that is newly diagnosed, or has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed), or has not responded to previous treatment (refractory) or relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ofatumumab and rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) together with monoclonal antibody therapy may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Cellular Immunotherapy following Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of cellular immunotherapy following chemotherapy in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia that has come back. Placing a modified gene into white blood cells may help the body build an immune response to kill cancer cells.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Stage I-II Nasal NK Cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed state I-II nasal natural killer (NK) cell lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, etoposide, ifosfamide, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) with radiation therapy may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Acute Lymphocytic or Myelogenous Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of total marrow and lymphoid irradiation (TMLI) in combination with etoposide and cyclophosphamide before donor stem cell transplant and to see how well it works in treating patients with high-risk acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who have failed previous therapy. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) uses imaging to provide a three-dimensional view of the area to be irradiated. Doctors can then shape and direct the radiation beams at the area from multiple directions while avoiding, as much as possible, nearby organs. TMLI is a method of using IMRT to direct radiation to the bone marrow. Radiation therapy is given before transplant to suppress the immune system, prevent rejection of the transplanted cells, and wipe out any remaining cancer cells. TMLI may allow a greater radiation dose to be delivered to the bone marrow as a preparative regimen before transplant while causing fewer side effects than standard radiation therapy.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated Intraocular Retinoblastoma

    This clinical trial studies combination chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed, previously untreated intraocular retinoblastoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, carboplatin, topotecan hydrochloride, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. In this trial, the first two cycles of chemotherapy will be given directly to the eye, and followed by additional chemotherapy. Giving the first two cycles of chemotherapy directly into the eye may improve the tumor's response to treatment.
    Location: Saint Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Conventional and Regulatory T Cells in Treating Patients with Advanced Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing T Cell-Depleted Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of conventional T cells and regulatory T cells and to see how well they work in treating patients with hematologic malignancies that have spread to other places in the body (advanced) and are undergoing T cell-depleted donor stem cell transplant. Giving chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Removing the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening. Giving an infusion of the donor's T cells (donor lymphocyte infusion) later may help the patient's immune system see any remaining cancer cells as not belonging in the patient's body and destroy them (called graft-versus-tumor effect).
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This clinical trial studies peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplant in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Giving chemotherapy and colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim (G-CSF), helps stem cells move from the patient’s bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy and radiation therapy.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Carboplatin, Melphalan, Etoposide Phosphate, Mannitol, and Sodium Thiosulfate in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Brain Tumors

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of melphalan when given together with carboplatin, etoposide phosphate, mannitol, and sodium thiosulfate and to see how well they work in treating patients with previously treated brain tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as melphalan, carboplatin, and etoposide phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) uses mannitol to open the blood vessels around the brain and allow cancer-killing substances to be carried directly to the brain. Sodium thiosulfate may help lessen or prevent hearing loss and toxicities in patients undergoing chemotherapy with carboplatin and BBBD. Giving carboplatin, melphalan, etoposide phosphate, mannitol, and sodium thiosulfate together may be an effective treatment for brain tumors.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon