Clinical Trials Using Guadecitabine

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Guadecitabine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-7 of 7
  • Testing the Combination of Belinostat and SGI-110 (Guadecitabine) for the Treatment of Unresectable and Metastatic Conventional Chondrosarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well belinostat and SGI-110 (guadecitabine) work in treating patients with conventional chondrosarcoma that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) and has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Belinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as guadecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving belinostat and guadecitabine may lower the chance of chondrosarcoma growing or spreading.
    Location: 17 locations

  • Guadecitabine and Carboplatin in Treating Patients with Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well guadecitabine and carboplatin work in treating patients with small cell lung cancer that has spread outside of the lung in which it began or to other parts of the body (extensive stage). Guadecitabine may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving guadecitabine and carboplatin may work better in treating patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer compared to other standard of care chemotherapy drugs.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Guadecitabine and Durvalumab in Treating Patients with Advanced Liver, Pancreatic, Bile Duct, or Gallbladder Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of guadecitabine and how well it works when given together with durvalumab in treating patients with liver, pancreatic, bile duct, or gallbladder cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Guadecitabine may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with durvalumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving guadecitabine and durvalumab may work better in treating patients with liver, pancreatic, bile duct, or gallbladder cancer.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Pembrolizumab, Guadecitabine, and Mocetinostat in Treating Patients with Stage IIIb-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase I / Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of guadecitabine and mocetinostat and how well they work when given together with pembrolizumab in treating patients with stage IIIb-IV non-small cell lung cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as guadecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Mocetinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab, guadecitabine, and mocetinostat together may work in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Study of Durvalumab and Guadecitabine in Advanced Kidney Cancer

    This is a single arm, multi-centre (via Big Ten Cancer Research Consortium) phase Ib / II study of patients treated with durvalumab 1500 mg IV q 4 weeks in combination with guadecitabine at the recommended phase 2 dose subcutaneously for 5 consecutive days. Eligible patients will have metastatic RCC with a clear cell component, ECOG performance status of 0-1, have received 0-1 prior therapy but no prior anti-PD-1 / PD-L1 / CTLA4 (Cohort 1, 36 subjects). Study treatment could potentially continue for up to 13 cycles (52 weeks).
    Location: 3 locations

  • Guadecitabine and Nivolumab in Treating Participants with Refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of guadecitabine when given together with nivolumab and to see how well they work in treating participants with colorectal cancer that does not respond to treatment and has spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as guadecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving guadecitabine and nivolumab may work better in treating participants with colorectal cancer.
    Location: USC / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Guadecitabine and Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome Relapsing after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase IIa trial studies how well guadecitabine works in treating patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome that has returned after a period of improvement after allogeneic stem cell transplant. Guadecitabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving guadecitabine before the transplant may stop this from happening. Once the donated stem cells begin working, the patient's immune system may see the remaining cancer cells as not belonging in the patient's body and destroy them. Giving an infusion of the donor's white blood cells (donor lymphocyte infusion) may boost this effect.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas