Clinical Trials Using Idelalisib

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Idelalisib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-6 of 6
  • Idelalisib in Treating Participants with Indolent or Transformed Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma after Autologous Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of idelalisib and how well it works in treating participants with indolent or transformed indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma after undergoing autologous stem cell transplant. Idelalisib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Pembrolizumab Alone or with Idelalisib or Ibrutinib in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Other Low-Grade B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab alone or with idelalisib or ibrutinib works in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or other low-grade B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas that have returned after a period of improvement or have not responded to treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Idelalisib and ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab alone or with idelalisib or ibrutinib may be an effective treatment in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or other low-grade B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Idelalisib in Treating Patients with B Cell Malignancies after Donor Bone Marrow Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of idelalisib in treating patients with B cell malignancies after donor bone marrow transplant. Idelalisib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Personalized Kinase Inhibitor Therapy Combined with Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase IB trial studies the feasibility of using a functional laboratory based study to determine how well the test can be used to select personalized kinase inhibitor therapy in combination with standard chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). It also evaluates safety and potential efficacy. Kinase inhibitor is a type of substance that blocks an enzyme called a kinase. Human cells have many different kinase enzymes, and they help control important cell functions. Certain kinases are more active in some types of cancer cells and blocking them may help keep the cancer cells from growing. Testing samples of blood from patients with AML and ALL in the laboratory with kinase inhibitors may help determine which kinase inhibitor has more activity against cancer cells and which one should be combined with standard of care chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving a personalized kinase inhibitor therapy combined with standard chemotherapy may be a better treatment for AML and ALL.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Rituximab, Idelalisib, and Venetoclax in Treating Participants with Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of idelalisib and venetoclax when given together with rituximab. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Idelalisib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as venetoclax, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving rituximab, idelalisib and venetoclax may work better at treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
    Location: Virginia Commonwealth University / Massey Cancer Center, Richmond, Virginia

  • Mechanisms of Idelalisib-Associated Diarrhea in Patients with Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    This research trial studies the mechanisms of idelalisib-associated diarrhea in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or small lymphocytic lymphoma that has come back after a period of improvement. The cancer treatment drug idelalisib triggers diarrhea in some patients. Studying stool, blood, and tissue samples in the lab from patients who are given idelalisib may help doctors learn more about the side effects and may help to treat them in future patients.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California