Clinical Trials Using Mitomycin

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Mitomycin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-17 of 17
  • Lower-Dose Chemoradiation in Treating Patients with Early-Stage Anal Cancer, the DECREASE Study

    This phase II trial studies how well lower-dose chemotherapy plus radiation (chemoradiation) therapy works in comparison to standard-dose chemoradiation in treating patients with early-stage anal cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin, fluorouracil, and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. This study may help doctors find out if lower-dose chemoradiation is as effective and has fewer side effects than standard-dose chemoradiation, which is the usual approach for treatment of this cancer type.
    Location: 480 locations

  • Chemoradiotherapy with or without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Localized Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    This phase III trial studies how well chemotherapy and radiation therapy work with or without atezolizumab in treating patients with localized muscle invasive bladder cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy drugs, such as gemcitabine, cisplatin, fluorouracil and mitomycin-C, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving atezolizumab with radiation therapy and chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with localized muscle invasive bladder cancer compared to radiation therapy and chemotherapy without atezolizumab.
    Location: 187 locations

  • A Study of Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy Compared to Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy plus MEDI4736 (Durvalumab) Immunotherapy for Bladder Cancer Which has Spread to the Lymph Nodes, the INSPIRE Study

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy and radiation therapy alone works compared to chemotherapy and radiation therapy plus MEDI4736 (durvalumab) immunotherapy in treating bladder cancer which has spread to the lymph nodes. Drugs used in standard chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Immunotherapy with durvalumab may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving chemotherapy and radiation therapy with the addition of durvalumab may work better in helping tumors respond to treatment compared to chemotherapy and radiation therapy alone.
    Location: 159 locations

  • Mitomycin C or Floxuridine and Leucovorin during or after Surgery in Treating Patients with Appendiceal, Colon, or Rectal Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well mitomycin C or floxuridine and leucovorin during or after surgery works in treating patients with appendiceal, colon, or rectal cancer. Chemotherapy drugs, such as mitomycin C, floxuridine, and leucovorin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether heating a chemotherapy solution and infusing it directly into the abdomen during surgery kills more tumor cells than infusing a chemotherapy solution directly into the abdomen after surgery.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Transarterial Chemoembolization for the Treatment of Lung Metastases

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of transarterial chemoembolization in treating patients with tumors that has spread to the lungs (lung metastases). Lung chemoembolization works by delivering chemotherapy directly into the artery that supplies oxygen to lung tumors. At the same time, the artery is plugged up (embolized). This traps the chemotherapy inside the tumor and also cuts off the tumor’s blood supply. As a result, the tumor is exposed to a high dose of chemotherapy, and is also deprived of nutrients and oxygen.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Minimally-Invasive Cytoreduction and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Low-Volume Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

    This phase I trial studies a minimally-invasive cytoreduction and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy in treating patients with a small amount (low-volume) of peritoneal carcinomatosis, which is a term used to describe the widespread of cancerous tumors in the peritoneal cavity. Minimally-invasive cytoreduction is a less invasive type of surgery for peritoneal carcinomatosis and may have fewer side effects and improve recovery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin C, cisplatin, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Heating a chemotherapy solution and infusing it directly into the abdomen may kill more tumor cells. Giving minimally-invasive cytoreduction with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy may work better in treating peritoneal carcinomatosis.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Heated Chemotherapy Solution (Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy) Using Mitomycin-C or Melphalan in Treating Patients with Colorectal Peritoneal Carcinomatosis Undergoing Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy using mitomycin-C or melphalan works in treating patients with tumors that develop in the lining of the abdomen (peritoneal carcinomatosis) due to colorectal cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin-C and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving heated chemotherapy drugs directly into the abdomen during surgery may kill more tumor cells. This study may help doctors see if one of the chemotherapy drugs (mitomycin-C or melphalan) is safer or more effective than the other in helping patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis live longer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cabozantinib, Ipilimumab, Nivolumab, and Transarterial Chemoembolization for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    This phase II trial investigates how well cabozantinib, ipilimumab, nivolumab, and transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) work in treating patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Cabozantinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. TACE is a procedure that blocks or slows down the blood supply to the cancer and delivers chemotherapy directly to the tumor so that the tumor cells die. TACE is done by injecting a material through a thin tube (called a catheter) into the large blood vessels that are feeding the tumor. The material blocks the arteries and delivers chemotherapy to the tumor. Giving cabozantinib, ipilimumab, nivolumab, and TACE together may control the disease longer than the standard (usual) treatment.
    Location: UC Irvine Health / Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, Orange, California

  • Laparoscopic HIPEC with Chemoradiation as First Line Treatment in Treating Patients with Local Regional Advanced Gastric Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) with chemoradiation works as first line treatment in treating patients with gastric cancer that has spread from its original site of growth to nearby tissues or lymph nodes. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin, paclitaxel, carboplatin, fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Heating a chemotherapy solution and infusing it directly into the abdomen may kill more tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving HIPEC with chemoradiation may work better in treating patients with gastric cancer.
    Location: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York

  • Efficacy and Safety of Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) in Combination With Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) Versus CRT Alone in Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer (MIBC) (MK-3475-992 / KEYNOTE-992)

    This study is designed to assess the antitumor efficacy and safety of pembrolizumab in combination with chemoradiotherapy (CRT) versus CRT alone in participants with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). The primary hypothesis is that pembrolizumab + chemoradiotherapy is superior to placebo + chemoradiotherapy with respect to bladder intact event-free survival.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • A Study of Erdafitinib Versus Investigator Choice of Intravesical Chemotherapy in Participants Who Received Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and Recurred With High Risk Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate recurrence-free survival (RFS) in participants treated with erdafitinib vs Investigator's Choice, for participants with high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) who harbor fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) mutations or fusions, and who recurred after bacillus calmette-guerin (BCG) therapy.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC) for the Treatment of Stomach Cancer with Peritoneal Metastases

    This phase IIa trial studies how well HIPEC works in treating patients with stomach cancer that has spread to the abdominal cavity (peritoneal metastases). HIPEC involves the infusion of a heated chemotherapy solution that circulates into the abdominal cavity. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin and mitomycin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. HIPEC with cisplatin and mitomycin may be able to change protein expression in stomach cancer, as well as change the amount of disease in the abdominal cavity.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • MnSOD Mimetic BMX-001 in Treating Patients with Anal Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of MnSOD mimetic BMX-001 to reduce side effects in patients with anal cancer undergoing radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Chemoprotective drugs, such as BMX-001, may protect normal cells from the side effects of chemotherapy while enhancing tumor killing.
    Location: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska

  • Heated Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy and Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer With Positive Peritoneal Cytology

    Background: Gastric cancer is a common and serious cancer. Standard treatment is chemotherapy drugs. Researchers want to see if a new treatment helps. It is surgical removal of the cancer and heated chemotherapy delivered to the abdominal cavity called HIPEC. Objective: To test if surgical removal of tumors plus heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy can improve survival in people with gastric cancers. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with gastric cancer who can have most tumors surgically removed Design: Participants will be screened with: - Medical history - Physical exam - Blood, urine, and heart tests - Scans - Tissue sample from previous surgery - Endoscopy with biopsy: A tube with a camera goes through the mouth and into the stomach. It and takes a sample of stomach tissue. Participants might may get medicine to make them drowsy. - Laparoscopy: Small cuts are made in the abdomen. A thin tube with a light and camera is inserted into the abdomen. Participants sleep through the procedure. Participants will stay in the hospital. They will have: - Surgery to remove as many tumors as possible. - HIPEC for 60 minutes: Two thin tubes are put into the abdomen. Two chemotherapy drugs are given through one tube. They are drained out through another at a temperature a few degrees above normal body temperature. Another drug is given in a vein. Recovery for 7-21 days: Participants will have tubes in their stomach and bladder and IVs for a few days. They will get pain medicine, IV fluids, antibiotics, and blood transfusions as needed. Participants will have visits every few months for 3 years, then one a year. Visits include physical exam, blood tests, and scans. They also include dietary assessment and questions.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Mitomycin in Treating Patients with P16 Positive Oropharyngeal or P16 Negative Head and Neck Cancer That is Resistant to Platin, Fluorouracil, Cetuximab, and Taxane

    This phase II trial studies how well mitomycin works in treating patients with tumor protein (p)16 positive oropharyngeal or p16 negative head and neck squamous cell cancer that is resistant to platin, fluorouracil, cetuximab, and taxane. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Cytoreductive Surgery and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Mitomycin C Followed by Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

    This phase II trial studies how well cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal mitomycin C followed by standard chemotherapy works in treating patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. Cytoreductive surgery helps to reduce the number of cancer cells prior to treatment. Hyperthermia therapy kills tumor cells by heating them to several degrees above normal body temperature. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin C, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Infusing mitomycin C directly into the abdomen may kill more tumor cells while reducing side effects. Giving cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal mitomycin C may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Montefiore Medical Center-Weiler Hospital, Bronx, New York

  • Topical Mitomycin C for the Treatment of Complex Benign Esophageal Anastomotic Strictures, GI-108 Study

    This phase II trial investigates how well mitomycin C works for the treatment of a condition called complex benign esophageal anastomotic stricture, in which the food pipe becomes narrow due to non-cancerous reasons and there is difficulty in swallowing (dysphagia). Endoscopic dilation is carried out without using mitomycin C as a standard care but the use of this drug may reduce the number of procedures needed to achieve dilation and to reduce dysphagia. Mitomycin C may also prevent recurrence of stricture.
    Location: Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania