Clinical Trials Using Mitomycin

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Mitomycin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-11 of 11
  • Chemoradiotherapy with or without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Localized Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    This phase III trial studies how well chemotherapy and radiation therapy work with or without atezolizumab in treating patients with localized muscle invasive bladder cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine, cisplatin, fluorouracil and mitomycin-C, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving atezolizumab with radiation therapy and chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with localized muscle invasive bladder cancer compared to radiation therapy and chemotherapy without atezolizumab.
    Location: 87 locations

  • Mitomycin C or Floxuridine and Leucovorin Calcium during or after Surgery in Treating Patients with Appendiceal, Colon, or Rectal Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well mitomycin C or floxuridine and leucovorin calcium during or after surgery works in treating patients with appendiceal, colon, or rectal cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin C, floxuridine, and leucovorin calcium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether heating a chemotherapy solution and infusing it directly into the abdomen during surgery kills more tumor cells than infusing a chemotherapy solution directly into the abdomen after surgery.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Minimally-Invasive Cytoreduction and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Low-Volume Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

    This phase I trial studies a minimally-invasive cytoreduction and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy in treating patients with a small amount (low-volume) of peritoneal carcinomatosis, which is a term used to describe the widespread of cancerous tumors in the peritoneal cavity. Minimally-invasive cytoreduction is a less invasive type of surgery for peritoneal carcinomatosis and may have fewer side effects and improve recovery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin C, cisplatin, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Heating a chemotherapy solution and infusing it directly into the abdomen may kill more tumor cells. Giving minimally-invasive cytoreduction with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy may work better in treating peritoneal carcinomatosis.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Risk Enabled Therapy After Initiating Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer (RETAIN)

    The aim of this study is to evaluate a risk-adapted approach to the treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer. Each baseline transuretheral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) sample will be sequenced while proceeding with neoadjuvant accelerated methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin (AMVAC) chemotherapy. Based on the mutational profile and the post AMVAC TURBT findings, patients will be treated with active surveillance (experimental arm), or standard of care intravesicle therapy, chemoradiation or surgery. We hypothesize that this approach will lead to non-inferior metastasis-free survival at 2 years, while preserving the bladder and thus quality-of-life for a proportion of patients.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Mitomycin C Intravesical Chemotherapy in Conjunction With Synergo® Radiofrequency-Induced Hyperthermia for Treatment of Carcinoma in Situ Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer Patients Unresponsive to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, With or Without Papillary Tumors.

    This study will determine whether Synergo® RITE + MMC treatment is efficacious as second-line therapy for CIS NMIBC BCG-unresponsive patients with or without papillary NMIBC, through examination of the complete response rate (CRR) and disease-free duration for complete responders. The study will also explore progression-free survival time, bladder preservation rate, and overall survival time. The study will address an unmet need to identify a treatment effective in both ablating the disease and providing a prolonged disease-free period for patients. Ideally, the treatment will delay progression to invasive disease, thus preserving the bladder.
    Location: 4 locations

  • MnSOD Mimetic BMX-001 in Treating Patients with Anal Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of MnSOD mimetic BMX-001 to reduce side effects in patients with anal cancer undergoing radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Chemoprotective drugs, such as BMX-001, may protect normal cells from the side effects of chemotherapy while enhancing tumor killing.
    Location: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska

  • Heated Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy and Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer With Positive Peritoneal Cytology

    Background: Gastric cancer is a common and serious cancer. Standard treatment is chemotherapy drugs. Researchers want to see if a new treatment helps. It is surgical removal of the cancer and heated chemotherapy delivered to the abdominal cavity called HIPEC. Objective: To test if surgical removal of tumors plus heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy can improve survival in people with gastric cancers. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with gastric cancer who can have most tumors surgically removed Design: Participants will be screened with: - Medical history - Physical exam - Blood, urine, and heart tests - Scans - Tissue sample from previous surgery - Endoscopy with biopsy: A tube with a camera goes through the mouth and into the stomach. It and takes a sample of stomach tissue. Participants might may get medicine to make them drowsy. - Laparoscopy: Small cuts are made in the abdomen. A thin tube with a light and camera is inserted into the abdomen. Participants sleep through the procedure. Participants will stay in the hospital. They will have: - Surgery to remove as many tumors as possible. - HIPEC for 60 minutes: Two thin tubes are put into the abdomen. Two chemotherapy drugs are given through one tube. They are drained out through another at a temperature a few degrees above normal body temperature. Another drug is given in a vein. Recovery for 7-21 days: Participants will have tubes in their stomach and bladder and IVs for a few days. They will get pain medicine, IV fluids, antibiotics, and blood transfusions as needed. Participants will have visits every few months for 3 years, then one a year. Visits include physical exam, blood tests, and scans. They also include dietary assessment and questions.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Heated Chemotherapy Solution (Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy) Using Mitomycin-C or Melphalan in Treating Patients with Colorectal Peritoneal Carcinomatosis Undergoing Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy using mitomycin-C or melphalan works in treating patients with tumors that develop in the lining of the abdomen (peritoneal carcinomatosis) due to colorectal cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin-C and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving heated chemotherapy drugs directly into the abdomen during surgery may kill more tumor cells. This study may help doctors see if one of the chemotherapy drugs (mitomycin-C or melphalan) is safer or more effective than the other in helping patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis live longer.
    Location: University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, Kansas

  • Genomic Based Assignment of Therapy in Advanced Urothelial Carcinoma

    Background: Advanced urothelial cancer has no cure. But only a few chemotherapy drugs have been tested for it. The Co-eXpression ExtrapolatioN (COXEN) model predicts if cells respond to treatment. It may also help determine which drugs fight urothelial cancer based on the characteristics of a tumor. Researchers want to test if this model can choose the best therapy for advanced urothelial cancer within 3 weeks and how tumors respond to the next best therapy. Objective: To test if the COXEN model can choose the best therapy for advanced urothelial cancer within 3 weeks. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older whose urothelial cancer has spread after at least 1 line of chemotherapy Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, blood and urine tests, and tumor scans. Participants will provide a tumor sample from a previous surgery and a new biopsy. A needle will remove a small piece of tumor. Participants will repeat screening tests, plus have an EKG and scan. For the scan, they will get an injection of radioactive drug. They will lie in a machine that takes pictures. Participants will take the drugs assigned by the COXEN model. They will have visits every 2 3 weeks. These will include blood and urine tests. Participants will have tumor scans every 8 9 weeks. Participants may have another biopsy. Participants will take the drugs until they can t tolerate the side effects or their cancer worsens. They may be assigned to a second COXEN therapy. Participants will have a follow-up visit 4 5 weeks after their last drug dose. Participants will be contacted by phone every few months until death. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Mitomycin in Treating Patients with P16 Positive Oropharyngeal or P16 Negative Head and Neck Cancer That is Resistant to Platin, Fluorouracil, Cetuximab, and Taxane

    This phase II trial studies how well mitomycin works in treating patients with tumor protein (p)16 positive oropharyngeal or p16 negative head and neck squamous cell cancer that is resistant to platin, fluorouracil, cetuximab, and taxane. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Cytoreductive Surgery and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Mitomycin C Followed by Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

    This phase II trial studies how well cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal mitomycin C followed by standard chemotherapy works in treating patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. Cytoreductive surgery helps to reduce the number of cancer cells prior to treatment. Hyperthermia therapy kills tumor cells by heating them to several degrees above normal body temperature. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin C, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Infusing mitomycin C directly into the abdomen may kill more tumor cells while reducing side effects. Giving cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal mitomycin C may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Montefiore Medical Center-Weiler Hospital, Bronx, New York