Clinical Trials Using Mycophenolate Mofetil

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Mycophenolate Mofetil. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-50 of 69

  • Reduced Intensity Conditioning and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well reduced intensity conditioning (a short course of chemotherapy) and stem cell transplant work in treating patients with blood cancer. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Giving reduced intensity conditioning and total body irradiation before a donor blood stem cell transplant helps to stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells with shorter recovery and fewer side effects.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Fludarabine-Based Conditioning before Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Patients with Acquired Aplastic Anemia or Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

    This trial studies how well fludarabine-based reduced intensity conditioning regimen works in preventing transplant rejection in patients with aplastic anemia or inherited bone marrow failure syndromes scheduled to undergo donor bone marrow transplant. Reduced intensity conditioning involves giving medicines that decrease the amount of white blood cells in the body. These cells support the immune system which fights infection and also help the body identify anything that is new and determine if it needs to get rid of it. Decreasing the amount of white blood cells may help the new bone marrow to get accepted and not be rejected by the body’s immune system.
    Location: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Partially HLA-Mismatched Related Donor Stem Cell Transplant Using Killer Immunoglobulin Receptor and Human Leukocyte Antigen Based Donor Selection in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well partially human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched related donor stem cell transplant using killer immunoglobulin receptor or HLA based donor selection works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Partially mismatched donor stem cells may reduce the risk of cancer recurring after transplant.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Busulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies the side effect of busulfan, fludarabine phosphate, and post-transplant cyclophosphamide in treating patients with blood cancer undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as busulfan, fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy such as busulfan and fludarabine phosphate before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide after the transplant may stop this from happening. Once the donated stem cells begin working, the patient's immune system may see the remaining cancer cells as not belonging in the patient's body and destroy them.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Chemotherapy, Total Body Irradiation, Donor Bone Marrow Transplant, and Immunosuppressive Therapy in Treating Patients with Severe Aplastic Anemia

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy, total body irradiation, donor bone marrow transplant, and immunosuppressive therapy work in treating patients with severe aplastic anemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells called graft-versus-host disease. Giving immunosuppressive therapy, such as tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil, after the transplant may stop this from happening. Giving chemotherapy, total body irradiation, donor bone marrow transplant, and immunosuppressive therapy may work better in treating patients with severe aplastic anemia.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells after Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well cytokine-induced killer cells after donor stem cell transplant work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back or has not responded to treatment. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cytokine-induced killer cells after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Cyclophosphamide, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation with or without Anti-Thymocyte Globulin before Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of cyclophosphamide, fludarabine phosphate, and total-body irradiation with or without anti-thymocyte globulin before donor umbilical cord blood transplant and to see how well they work in treating patients with hematologic cancer. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil before and after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Fludarabine, Cyclophosphamide, and Total-Body Irradiation before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Blood Diseases

    This phase II trial studies how well fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and total-body irradiation before donor stem cell transplant work in treating patients with blood diseases. Giving chemotherapy, such as fludarabine and cyclophosphamide, and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Pilot Trial of Allogeneic Blood or Marrow Transplantation for Primary Immunodeficiencies

    Background: Allogeneic blood or marrow transplant is when stem cells are taken from one person s blood or bone marrow and given to another person. Researchers think this may help people with immune system problems. Objective: To see if allogeneic blood or bone marrow transplant is safe and effective in treating people with primary immunodeficiencies. Eligibility: Donors: Healthy people ages 4 or older Recipients: People ages 4-75 with a primary immunodeficiency that may be treated with allogeneic blood or marrow transplant Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, and blood tests. Participants will have urine tests, EKG, and chest x-ray. Donors will have: Bone marrow harvest: With anesthesia, marrow is taken by a needle in the hipbone. OR Blood collection: They will have several drug injections over 5-7 days. Blood is taken by IV in one arm, circulates through a machine to remove stem cells, and returned by IV in the other arm. Possible vein assessment or pre-anesthesia evaluation Recipients will have: Lung test, heart tests, radiology scans, CT scans, and dental exam Possible tissue biopsies or lumbar puncture Bone marrow and a small piece of bone removed by needle in the hipbone. Chemotherapy 1-2 weeks before transplant day Donor stem cell donation through a catheter put into a vein in the chest or neck Several-week hospital stay. They will take medications and may need blood transfusions and additional procedures. After discharge, recipients will: Remain near the clinic for about 3 months. They will have weekly visits and may require hospital readmission. Have multiple follow-up visits to the clinic in the first 6 months, and less frequently for at least 5 years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Reduced Intensity Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This clinical trial studies the use of reduced intensity chemotherapy and radiation therapy before donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Giving low doses of chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine phosphate, before a donor stem cell transplant may help stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient’s immune system from rejecting the donor’s stem cells. The donated stem cells may replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Reducing the intensity of the chemotherapy and radiation may also reduce the side effects of the donor stem cell transplant.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Genetically Modified Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Zoledronic Acid in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed / Refractory Hematologic Malignancies or High Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of zoledronic acid given after genetically modified donor stem cell transplant in treating younger patients with hematologic malignancies or high risk tumors that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When healthy stem cells from a donor that have been genetically modified are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus after the transplant may stop this from happening. Giving zoledronic acid after the transplant may help strengthen the immune system and make the immune cells work better.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Intensity Modulated Total Marrow Irradiation, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Melphalan in Treating Patients with Relapsed Hematologic Cancers Undergoing a Second or above Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of intensity modulated total marrow irradiation (IMTMI) when given together with fludarabine phosphate and melphalan in treating patients with cancers of the blood (hematologic) that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) undergoing a second or above donor stem cell transplant. IMTMI is a type of radiation therapy to the bone marrow that may be less toxic and may also reduce the chances of cancer to return. Giving fludarabine phosphate, melphalan, and IMTMI before a donor stem cell transplant may help stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • JAK Inhibitor before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Primary or Secondary Myelofibrosis

    This phase II trial studies how well giving a JAK inhibitor before a donor stem cell transplant works in treating patients with myelofibrosis that developed without another condition (primary) or evolved from other bone marrow disorders (secondary). JAK inhibitors are a class of drugs that may stop the growth of abnormal cells by blocking an enzyme needed for cell growth. Giving a JAK inhibitor such as ruxolitinib before a donor stem cell transplant may help reduce symptoms of myelofibrosis such as inflammation and enlargement of the spleen, improve the patient’s general physical condition, and prevent complications from occurring after the transplant. Infusing healthy stem cells from a donor into the patient may help the patient's bone marrow work normally and make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Giving a JAK inhibitor before a donor stem cell transplant may help improve transplant outcomes in patients with myelofibrosis.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with Hematological Diseases

    This phase II trial studies donor stem cell transplant followed by cyclophosphamide in treating patients with hematological diseases. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can attack the body's normal cells, called graft versus host disease. Giving cyclophosphamide after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

  • Partially-Matched Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This pilot clinical trial studies partially-matched donor stem cell transplant in treating younger patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies. Giving chemotherapy and / or total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Lurie Children's Hospital-Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

  • Natural Killer Cells before and after Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    This phase I / II studies the side effects and best dose of natural killer cells before and after donor stem cell transplant and to see how well they work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, or chronic myelogenous leukemia. Giving chemotherapy with or without total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell or bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells and natural killer cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Ibritumomab Tiuxetan before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well ibritumomab tiuxetan before donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant works in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned or does not respond to treatment. Giving rituximab, antithymocyte globulin, and total-lymphoid irradiation (TLI) before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells and helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. Also, radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, such as ibritumomab tiuxetan, can find cancer cells and carry cancer-killing substances to them without harming normal cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving rituximab, antithymocyte globulin, and TLI before the transplant together with cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening. Giving a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • Targeting the IPA and Matching for the Non-Inherited Maternal Antigen for Haplo-Cord Transplantation

    In this trial, we aim to improve the outcomes of haplo cord transplant. Haplo cord transplant is a novel and promising way to improve transplant outcomes. We hypothesize that identification of a graft that is at least 5 / 6 matched and inherited paternal antigen (IPA) targeted (i.e., cord blood grafts share one or more IPA antigens with the prospective recipient) is more important to the outcome of haplo cord transplant than the nucleated cell dose. The identification of such a graft for a large proportion of the subjects may necessitate accepting a lower umbilical cord graft dose. In addition to a umbilical cord blood transplant, recipients will receive stem cells from a family member ( a haplo-identical donor) . After collection and prior to infusion, these cells will be purified using a device called a CliniMACS CD34 selection device. The subject will undergo a chemotherapy conditioning regimen prior to transplantation. No experimental drugs are used in this study, and the combinations of drugs that will be used in the conditioning regimen are combinations that have been used in the past.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well a donor bone marrow transplant works in treating patients with solid tumors that are likely to recur (come back) or spread. Giving low doses of chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells when they do not exactly match the patient's blood. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Reduced-Intensity Conditioning before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies reduced-intensity conditioning before donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies. Giving low-doses of chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient’s immune system from rejecting the donor’s stem cells. The donated stem cells may replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Giving an infusion of the donor’s T cells (donor lymphocyte infusion) before the transplant may help increase this effect.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, Clofarabine, and Busulfan before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Refractory B-Cell or T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of gemcitabine hydrochloride, clofarabine, and busulfan before donor stem cell transplant and to see how well it works in treating patients with B-cell or T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma or Hodgkin lymphoma that does not respond to treatment. Giving chemotherapy before a donor bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Reduced Intensity Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well reduced intensity donor stem cell transplant works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening. Once the donated stem cells begin working, the patient's immune system may see the remaining cancer cells as not belonging in the patient's body and destroy them. Giving an infusion of the donor's white blood cells (donor lymphocyte infusion) may boost this effect.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Low-Dose Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and the best way to give low-dose donor bone marrow transplant (BMT) and to see how well it works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Giving low-doses of chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, before a donor bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's bone marrow cells. When the healthy stem cells from a related or unrelated donor, that do not exactly match the patient's blood, are infused into the patient they may help patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body’s normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) after transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Pilot Study of Reduced-Intensity Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant of DOCK8 Deficiency

    Background: -DOCK8 deficiency is a genetic disorder that affects the immune system and can lead to severe recurrent infections and possible death from infections or certain types of cancers, including blood cancers. A stem cell transplant is a life-saving treatment for this condition. In this study we are evaluating the efficacy and safety of transplant from different donor sources for DOCK8 deficiency. The donors that we are using are matched siblings, matched unrelated donors, and half-matched donors, so called haploidentical related donors, such as as mothers or fathers or half-matched siblings. Objectives: -To determine whether transplant of bone marrow cells from different types of donors corrects DOCK8 deficiency. Eligibility: - Donors: Healthy individuals between 2 and 60 years of age who are matched with a recipient. - Recipient: Individuals between 5 and 40 years of age who have DOCK8 deficiency, have suffered one or more life-threatening infections, or have had certain viral related cancers of cancer and have a stem cell donor. Design: - All participants will be screened with a physical examination and medical history. - DONORS: - Donors will donate bone marrow cells or blood stem cells. If donating blood stem cells, donors will receive injections of filgrastim to release stem cells into the blood. After 5 days of filgrastim injections, donors will have apheresis to donate stem cells and white blood cells that are present in the blood. - Donors who provide the stem cells through bone marrow donation will have their bone marrow cells harvested in the operating room. - RECIPIENTS: - Recipients receiving matched related or unrelated donors will receive 4 days of chemotherapy with busulfan and fludarabine to suppress their immune system and prepare them for the transplant. Donors receiving haploidentical related donors will receive two doses of chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, 5 days of fludarabine, 3 days of busulfan, and one dose of radiation to suppress their immune system and prepare them for the transplant. - After the initial chemotherapy and radiation, recipients will receive the donated stem cells as a single infusion. Recipients may also receive white blood cells from their stem cell donor to encourage acceptance of the stem cells. - After the stem cell transplant, recipients will receive two days of a chemotherapy called cyclophosphamide on day's + 3 and + 4 followed by two drugs tacrolimus and mycophenolate to prevent graft versus host disease where the donor cells attack the patient's body. All patients will remain in the hospital for approximately 1 month, and will be followed with regular visits for up to 3 years with periodic visits thereafter to evaluate the success of the transplant and any side effects.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Reduced Intensity Conditioning Regimen for the Treatment of Non-Malignant Disorders

    This phase II trial studies how well a reduced intensity conditioning regimen works in treating patients with non-cancer (non-malignant) disorders. Reduced intensity conditioning involves giving medicines that suppress the immune system before giving the donor stem cells. It does not completely eliminate the blood making cells in bone marrow. Giving a reduced intensity conditioning regimen may result in fewer short and long term side effects, shorter hospital stay than after conditioning that completely destroys the bone marrow, and blood counts may recover more quickly.
    Location: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania