Clinical Trials Using Mycophenolate Mofetil

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Mycophenolate Mofetil. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 72
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  • Scleroderma Treatment with Autologous Transplant (STAT) Study

    This phase II trial studies how well giving cyclophosphamide and anti-thymocyte globulin together followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT) and mycophenolate mofetil works in treating patients with systemic scleroderma (SSc). Stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored prior to treatment. To store the stem cells patients are given colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim (G-CSF) or chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide) to help stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. After storage, patients are then given high-dose chemotherapy, cyclophosphamide, and immunosuppression with anti-thymocyte globulin to suppress the immune system to prepare for the transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy and immunosuppression. After the stem cells have “engrafted” and have matured enough to support the immune system at approximately 2-3 months, patients are given a medication called mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or Myfortic. This medication is given to prevent worsening or reactivation of SSc and is referred to as maintenance therapy.
    Location: 12 locations

  • A Study of Ruxolitinib vs Best Available Therapy (BAT) in Patients With Steroid-refractory Chronic Graft vs. Host Disease (GvHD) After Bone Marrow Transplantation (REACH3)

    The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy of ruxolitinib against best available therapy in participants with steroid-refractory chronic graft-versus-host disease (SR cGvHD).
    Location: 9 locations

  • Optimizing Haploidentical Aplastic Anemia Transplantation (BMT CTN 1502)

    This study is a prospective, multicenter phase II study with patients receiving haploidentical transplantation for Severe Aplastic Anemia (SAA). The primary objective is to assess overall survival (OS) at 1 year post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).
    Location: 8 locations

  • Donor Bone Marrow Transplant Followed by Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Severe Aplastic Anemia or Other Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

    This phase II trial studies donor bone marrow transplant followed by chemotherapy in treating patients with severe aplastic anemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory), or other bone marrow failure syndromes. Infusing stem cells from a donor into a patient may help the patient’s bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Currently, treatment to suppress the immune system is given before transplant to stop graft-versus-host disease from happening. Giving treatment to suppress the immune system after the transplant may work better in stopping graft-versus-host disease, and may help increase the number of donors for a patient by allowing people with stem cells that do not exactly match the patient to be donors. Giving treatment to suppress the immune system after the transplant may work better in stopping graft-versus-host disease, and may increase the amount of possible donors for a patient by better preventing graft-versus-host disease.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Radiation- and Alkylator-free Bone Marrow Transplantation Regimen for Patients With Dyskeratosis Congenita

    Dyskeratosis congenita is a disease that affects numerous parts of the body, most typically causing failure of the blood system. Lung disease, liver disease and cancer are other frequent causes of illness and death. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) can cure the blood system but can make the lung and liver disease and risk of cancer worse, because of DNA damaging agents such as alkylators and radiation that are typically used in the procedure. Based on the biology of DC, we hypothesize that it may be possible to avoid these DNA damaging agents in patients with DC, and still have a successful BMT. In this protocol we will test whether a regimen that avoids DNA alkylators and radiation can permit successful BMT without compromising survival in patients with DC.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Treosulfan and Fludarabine Phosphate before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Nonmalignant Inherited Disorders

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well treosulfan and fludarabine phosphate with or without low dose radiation before donor stem cell transplantation works in treating patients with nonmalignant (noncancerous) diseases. Hematopoietic cell transplantation has been shown to be curative for many patients with nonmalignant (noncancerous) diseases such as primary immunodeficiency disorders, bone marrow failure syndromes, hemoglobinopathies, and inborn errors of metabolism (metabolic disorders). Powerful chemotherapy drugs and / or radiation are often used to condition the patient before infusion of the new healthy donor cells. The purpose of the conditioning therapy is to destroy the patient's abnormal bone marrow which doesn't work properly in order to make way for the new healthy donor cells which functions normally. Although effective in curing the patient's disease, many hematopoietic cell transplantation regimens use intensive chemotherapy and / or radiation which can be quite toxic, have significant side effects, and can potentially be life-threatening. Investigators are investigating whether a new conditioning regimen that uses less intensive drugs (treosulfan and fludarabine phosphate) with or without low dose radiation results in new blood-forming cells (engraftment) of the new donor cells without increased toxicities in patients with nonmalignant (noncancerous) diseases.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Selective Depletion of CD45RA+ T Cells from Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Grafts from HLA-Matched Related and Unrelated Donors in Preventing GVHD

    This phase II trial is for patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome or chronic myeloid leukemia who have been referred for a peripheral blood stem cell transplantation to treat their cancer. In these transplants, chemotherapy and total-body radiotherapy ('conditioning') are used to kill residual leukemia cells and the patient's normal blood cells, especially immune cells that could reject the donor cells. Following the chemo / radiotherapy, blood stem cells from the donor are infused. These stem cells will grow and eventually replace the patient's original blood system, including red cells that carry oxygen to our tissues, platelets that stop bleeding from damaged vessels, and multiple types of immune-system white blood cells that fight infections. Mature donor immune cells, especially a type of immune cell called T lymphocytes (or T cells) are transferred along with these blood-forming stem cells. T cells are a major part of the curative power of transplantation because they can attack leukemia cells that have survived the chemo / radiation therapy and also help to fight infections after transplantation. However, donor T cells can also attack a patient's healthy tissues in an often-dangerous condition known as Graft-Versus-Host-Disease (GVHD). Drugs that suppress immune cells are used to decrease the severity of GVHD; however, they are incompletely effective and prolonged immunosuppression used to prevent and treat GVHD significantly increases the risk of serious infections. Removing all donor T cells from the transplant graft can prevent GVHD, but doing so also profoundly delays infection-fighting immune reconstitution and eliminates the possibility that donor immune cells will kill residual leukemia cells. Work in animal models found that depleting a type of T cell, called naive T cells or T cells that have never responded to an infection, can diminish GVHD while at least in part preserving some of the benefits of donor T cells including resistance to infection and the ability to kill leukemia cells. This clinical trial studies how well the selective removal of naive T cells works in preventing GVHD after peripheral blood stem cell transplants. This study will include patients conditioned with high or medium intensity chemo / radiotherapy who can receive donor grafts from related or unrelated donors.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Optimizing PTCy Dose and Timing

    Background: Stem cell or bone marrow transplants can cure or control blood cancers. Sometimes the donor cells see the recipient s body as foreign. This can cause complications. A high dose of the drug cyclophosphamide (PTCy) can help reduce these risks. Researchers want to see if a lower dose of PTCy can have the same benefits. Objective: To see if a lower dose of PTCy will help people with blood cancers have a more successful transplant and fewer side effects. Eligibility: People ages 15-65 with leukemia, lymphoma, or multiple myeloma that is not curable with standard therapy and is at high risk of returning without transplant, and their healthy adult relatives Design: Transplant participants will be screened with: Blood, urine, breathing, and heart tests Scans Chest x-ray Bone marrow samples: A needle inserted into the participant s pelvis will remove marrow and a bone fragment. Transplant recipients will stay at the hospital and be prepped with chemotherapy over 6 days for the transplant. They will get stem cells through a catheter in the chest or neck. They will get the cyclophosphamide chemotherapy. They will stay in the hospital about 4 more weeks. They will have blood transfusions. They will have frequent blood tests and 2 bone marrow samples within 1 year after the transplant. Donor participants will be screened with: Blood, urine, and heart tests Chest x-ray Scans Donor participants will have bone marrow taken from their pelvis or stem cells taken from their blood. For the blood donation, blood will be taken from a vein in one arm, move through a machine to remove white blood cells, and be returned through a vein in the other arm. Participation will last up to 5 years....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Peripheral T Cell Lymphoma

    Background: Lymphoma is a type of blood cancer. Blood cell transplant can cure some people with lymphoma. Researchers want to see if they can limit the complications transplant can cause. Objective: To test if a stem cell transplant can cure or control lymphoma. Also to test if new ways of getting a recipient ready for a transplant may result in fewer problems and side effects. Eligibility: Recipients: People ages 12 and older with peripheral T cell lymphoma that does not respond to standard treatments Donors: Healthy people ages 18 and older whose relative has lymphoma Design: Participants will be screened with: Physical exam Blood and urine tests Bone marrow biopsy: A needle inserted into the participant s hip bone will remove marrow. Donors will also be screened with: X-rays Recipients will also be screened with: Lying in scanners that take pictures of the body Tumor sample Donors may donate blood. They will take daily shots for 5 7 days. They will have apheresis: A machine will take blood from one arm and take out their stem cells. The blood will be returned into the other arm. Recipients will be hospitalized at least 2 weeks before transplant. They will get a catheter: A plastic tube will be inserted into a vein in the neck or upper chest. They will get antibody therapy or chemotherapy. Recipients will get the transplant through their catheter. Recipients will stay in the hospital several weeks after transplant. They will get blood transfusions. They will take drugs including chemotherapy for about 2 months. Recipients will have visits 6, 12, 18, 24 months after transplant, then once a year for 5 years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Valproic Acid Expanded Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells in Treating Adult Patients with Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the effects of valproic acid expanded umbilical cord blood stem cells in treating adult patients with hematological malignancies undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Expanding or growing umbilical cord blood stem cells in a laboratory using valproic acid may lead to faster white blood cell count recovery, lower the risk of infections, and improve transplant results compared to umbilical cord blood stem cells that have not been expanded.
    Location: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York

  • Itacitinib in Reducing the Incidence of Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Hematologic Cancers Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of itacitinib in reducing the incidence of graft versus host disease (GVHD) in patients with hematologic (bone marrow and blood cells) cancers undergoing donor stem cell transplant. One of the side effects of a donor stem cell transplant is the development of GVHD, which occurs when some of the cells from the donor attack the recipient’s tissues, resulting in mild, moderate, or even life-threatening side effects to the recipient’s skin, stomach, intestine, and liver. Itacitinib may prevent or lessen the effect of GVHD while still effectively treating the hematologic cancer.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Very Low Dose Total Body Irradiation, Total Lymphoid Irradiation, and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin in Treating Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well very low dose total body irradiation, total lymphoid irradiation, and anti-thymocyte globulin work in treating patients undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Giving radiation therapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes, the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells called graft versus host disease. Giving anti-thymocyte globulin may help stop this from happening.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • 2-Step Approach to Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well a 2-step approach to stem cell transplant works in treating patients with blood cancers. Giving chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a lymphocyte (white blood cell) and stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. By giving the donor cells in two steps, the dose of lymphocytes given can be tightly controlled and they can be made more tolerant to the body. When the healthy lymphocytes and stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells called graft versus host disease. Giving tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil may stop this from happening.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Laboratory Expanded Umbilical Cord Blood Product (Spanlecortemlocel) in Treating Patients with High-Risk Blood Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how the transplantation of laboratory expanded cord blood, called spanlecortemlocel, works in treating patients with high-risk blood cancers. Umbilical cord blood transplantation has been primarily used in patients with blood cancers. However, the blood counts are slower to recover after this type of transplantation, which can result in a longer hospital stays and a greater number of transfusions. To speed up blood count recovery, the number of blood forming stem cells can be multiplied more than 300 times on average in the laboratory prior to transfusion. Using spanlecortemlocel may speed up blood count recovery in patients with high-risk blood cancers.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • 211At-BC8-B10 followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Participants with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of a radioactive agent linked to an antibody (211At-BC8-B10) followed by donor stem cell transplant in treating participants with acute myeloid leukemia, or acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or myelodysplastic syndrome that has come back or isn't responding to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as 211At-BC8-B10, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the participant, they may help the participant's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can attack the body's normal cells, called graft versus host disease. Giving cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and sirolimus after a transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Alpha Beta T-cells and CD19 B-cells Depleted Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Non-Malignant Blood and Immune Disorders

    This phase II trial studies how well alpha beta T-cells and CD19 B-cells depleted stem cell transplant works in treating patients with blood and immune disorders. Donor stem cell transplants contain kinds of white blood cells called T-cells and B-cells along with all the blood-forming cells that make up a healthy immune system. Sometimes donor stem cells are referred to as the "graft" and the patient receiving the "graft" is called the "host." Graft versus host disease (GVHD) and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) are side effects that can occur after transplantation. Removing alpha-beta T cells and CD19 B-cells from donor cells may help diminish these complications.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Alpha / Beta T Cell Depleted Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Fanconi Anemia

    This phase II trial studies how well alpha / beta T cell depleted stem cell transplant works in treating patients with Fanconi Anemia. Fanconi anemia is an inherited disorder that causes the bone marrow to stop making enough new blood cells (bone marrow failure) or to make abnormal cells (myelodysplastic syndrome or acute leukemia) and the only proven cure is a stem cell transplant. A common risk with a stem cell transplant is graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) which occurs when the donor cells (the graft) see the patient’s body (the host) as foreign and attack it. A method to decrease the risk of GVHD, is to remove most of the lymphocytes, a type of white blood cells, from the donor cell product. There has been a new machine developed which better selects the types of white blood cells to remove from the donor. This type of processing is called T cell receptor (TCR) alpha / beta T cell depletion. The purpose of this study is to learn if removing the donor T cells from the donor product using this new method will be a better way to reduce the risk of GVHD. The benefit of removing these cells with this new method is that they will prevent GVHD without requiring drugs to suppress the immune system. Potentially, the immune system will recover from the transplant faster, which in turn will also lessen the risk of severe infections.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Cyclophosphamide, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total Body Radiation, before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Participants with Blood Disorders and Blood Cancers

    This phase III trial studies how well cyclophosphamide, fludarabine phosphate, and total body radiation before donor stem cell transplant work in treating participants with blood disorders and blood cancers. Giving chemotherapy such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine phosphate and total body radiation before a stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow. When the healthy cells from a donor are infused into the participant, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, and platelets. The donated cells may also replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire

  • Tocilizumab in Improving Graft-Versus-Host Disease and Early Side Effects in Patients with Blood Cancers Undergoing Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well tocilizumab works in improving graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and early side effects in patients with blood cancers undergoing umbilical cord blood transplant. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before an umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called GVHD). Giving tocilizumab in addition to the standard approach for GVHD prevention after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Combination Chemotherapy, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Primary or Secondary Myelofibrosis

    This early phase I trial studies the side effects of combination chemotherapy, total body irradiation, and donor blood stem cell transplant in treating patients with primary or secondary myelofibrosis. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as melphalan, fludarabine phosphate, cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and filgrastim work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Giving combination chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor blood stem cell transplant helps to stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well donor stem cell transplant works in treating patients with blood cancer. Giving total-body irradiation before a donor transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Sorafenib, Busulfan and Fludarabine in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose of sorafenib when given together with busulfan and fludarabine in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment and who are undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Sorafenib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as busulfan and fludarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving sorafenib with busulfan and fludarabine may work better in treating patients with recurrent or refractory acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Comparison of Triple GVHD Prophylaxis Regimens for Nonmyeloablative or Reduced Intensity Conditioning Unrelated Mobilized Blood Cell Transplantation

    This randomized phase II trial includes a blood stem cell transplant from an unrelated donor to treat blood cancer. The treatment also includes chemotherapy drugs, but in lower doses than conventional (standard) stem cell transplants. The researchers will compare two different drug combinations used to reduce the risk of a common but serious complication called "graft versus host disease" (GVHD) following the transplant. Two drugs, cyclosporine (CSP) and sirolimus (SIR), will be combined with either mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PTCy). This part of the transplant procedure is the main research focus of the study.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • 211^At-BC8-B10 before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Mixed-Phenotype Acute Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of 211^astatine(At)-BC8-B10 before donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, or mixed-phenotype acute leukemia. Radioactive substances, such as astatine-211, linked to monoclonal antibodies, such as BC8, can bind to cancer cells and give off radiation which may help kill cancer cells and have less of an effect on healthy cells before donor stem cell transplant.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Combination Chemotherapy, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Secondary Myelofibrosis

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects of combination chemotherapy, total body irradiation, and donor blood stem cell transplant in treating patients with secondary myelofibrosis. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Giving combination chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor blood stem cell transplant helps to stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California


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