Clinical Trials Using Mycophenolate Mofetil

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Mycophenolate Mofetil. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 67
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  • Radiation- and Alkylator-free Bone Marrow Transplantation Regimen for Patients With Dyskeratosis Congenita

    Dyskeratosis congenita is a disease that affects numerous parts of the body, most typically causing failure of the blood system. Lung disease, liver disease and cancer are other frequent causes of illness and death. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) can cure the blood system but can make the lung and liver disease and risk of cancer worse, because of DNA damaging agents such as alkylators and radiation that are typically used in the procedure. Based on the biology of DC, we hypothesize that it may be possible to avoid these DNA damaging agents in patients with DC, and still have a successful BMT. In this protocol we will test whether a regimen that avoids DNA alkylators and radiation can permit successful BMT without compromising survival in patients with DC.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Optimizing Haploidentical Aplastic Anemia Transplantation (BMT CTN 1502)

    This study is a prospective, multicenter phase II study with patients receiving haploidentical transplantation for Severe Aplastic Anemia (SAA). The primary objective is to assess overall survival (OS) at 1 year post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).
    Location: 2 locations

  • Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well a donor bone marrow transplant works in treating patients with solid tumors that are likely to recur (come back) or spread. Giving low doses of chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells when they do not exactly match the patient's blood. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Chemotherapy and Cord Blood Transplant in Children and Young Adults with Blood Cancers or Non-malignant Disorders

    This phase II trial studies the effect of chemotherapy and a cord blood transplant in children and young adults with hematologic malignancies or non-malignant diseases. Chemotherapy drugs, such as clofarabine, fludarabine, and busulfan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Before receiving stem cells, the standard process, called cytoreduction, is to receive high doses of chemotherapy. This helps to make room in the bone marrow for new blood stem cells to grow, helps prevent the body from rejecting the transplanted cells, and helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body. This is called a conditioning regimen. However, high doses of chemotherapy can have serious side effects. This study may help researchers learn whether combining the chemotherapy drugs clofarabine, fludarabine, and busulfan is a safe and effective way to reduce the side effects from receiving a conditioning regimen in children and young adults receiving cord blood transplants.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant after Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Recurrent or Refractory High-Risk Solid Tumors in Pediatric and Adolescent-Young Adults

    This phase II trial investigates side effects and how well donor stem cell transplant after chemotherapy works in treating pediatric and adolescent-young adults with high-risk solid tumor that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Chemotherapy drugs, such as fludarabine, thiotepa, etoposide, melphalan, and rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps kill cancer cells in the body and helps make room in the patient's bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into a patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make more healthy cells and platelets and may help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Chemotherapy and Donor Stem Transplant for the Treatment of Patients with High Grade Brain Cancer

    This phase I trial investigates the side effects and effectiveness of chemotherapy followed by a donor (allogeneic) stem cell transplant when given to patients with high grade brain cancer. Chemotherapy drugs, such as fludarabine, thiotepa, etoposide, melphalan, and rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps kill cancer cells in the body and helps make room in the patient's bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into a patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make more healthy cells and platelets and may help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Mycophenolate Mofetil Combined with Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Recurrent Glioblastoma or Gliosarcoma

    This early phase I / I trial evaluates how well mycophenolate mofetil combined with radiation therapy in treating patients with glioblastoma or gliosarcoma that has come back (recurrent). Mycophenolate mofetil may be used in combination with other medications to keep the body from attacking and rejecting a transplanted organ (such as a kidney, liver, heart). It belongs to a class of medications called immune-suppressants. It works by weakening the body's defense system (immune system) to help your body accept the new organ. Mycophenolate mofetil combined with radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with recurrent glioblastoma or gliosarcoma.
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • RGI-2001 for the Prevention of Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Hematological Malignancies after Stem Cell Transplantation

    This phase I trial investigates how well RGI-2001 works in preventing graft versus host disease in patients with hematological malignancies after a stem cell transplantation. Graft versus host disease is a very common condition that patients experience after receiving a stem cell transplant. It is a condition in which cells from the donor’s tissue attack the organs. RGI-2001 may work by altering the donor’s immune system in the transplanted blood to help it adjust to the body tissues. Giving RGI-2001, in combination with standard of care interventions, may prevent graft versus host disease in patients after undergoing blood stem cell transplantation.
    Location: Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Ruxolitinib for the Treatment of Graft Versus Host Disease Following Stem Cell Transplant in Patients with Primary and Secondary Myelofibrosis

    This phase II trial studies how well administering ruxolitinib before, during, and after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation works in preventing graft versus host disease and improving transplant outcomes in patients with primary and secondary myelofibrosis. Donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is currently the only treatment with proven curative potential for myelofibrosis, however, myelofibrosis patients have a high risk for developing graft versus host disease post-transplant. Graft versus host disease is a condition where the transplanted cells from a donor can attack the body's normal cells. Ruxolitinib, a janus-associated kinase (JAK) inhibitor, is known to decrease inflammatory signals, which may reduce spleen size and decrease symptoms such as night sweats and weight loss. Administering ruxolitinib before, during, and after transplant may decrease the incidence and severity of graft versus host disease, increase survival, and improve quality of life in patients with primary and secondary myelofibrosis.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • CLAG-M Chemotherapy and Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Donor Stem Cell Transplant for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of total body irradiation when given with CLAG-M chemotherapy reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before stem cell transplant in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Giving chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps kill cancer cells in the body and helps make room in the patient's bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into a patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make more healthy cells and platelets and may help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can attack the body's normal cells called graft versus host disease. Giving cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine, and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Reduced Intensity Haploidentical Transplantation for the Treatment of Primary or Secondary Myelofibrosis

    This phase II trial studies the outcomes of using a JAK inhibitor prior to reduced intensity haploidentical (Haplo) transplantation for the treatment of primary or secondary myelofibrosis (MF). Haplo transplant has been shown to be safe and effective in patients with leukemia and lymphoma who don’t have an available sibling donor. The primary risk of using Haplo HCT in patients with MF is graft failure as the graft failure rate has been historically higher with Haplo HCT than with other donor sources and higher with MF patients due to bone marrow fibrosis than in patients with other hematologic malignancies. JAK inhibitors when used in patients with MF may decrease the size of the spleen and decrease inflammation in the bone marrow. Therefore using a JAK inhibitor prior to Haplo transplant has the potential to decrease graft failure in patients with MF. Haplo transplants for patients with MF have been done successfully at multiple institutions in patients not on a study and are currently being covered by Medicare.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant for People With Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases

    Background: During a transplant, blood stem cells from one person are given to someone else. The cells grow into the different cells that make up the immune system. This can cure people with certain immunodeficiencies. But transplant has many risks and complications. Objective: To see if stem cell transplant can be successfully performed in people with primary immunodeficiency disease and cure them. Eligibility: People ages 4-69 for whom a primary immunodeficiency (PID) or Primary Immune Regulatory Disorder (PIRD), has caused significant health problems and either standard management has not worked or there are no standard management options, along with their donors Design: Donors will be screened under protocol 01-C-0129. They will donate blood or bone marrow. Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Blood, urine, and heart tests CT or PET scans Before transplant, participants will have dental and eye exams. They will have a bone marrow biopsy. For this, a needle will be inserted through the skin into the pelvis to remove marrow. Participants will be hospitalized before their transplant. They will have a central catheter put into a vein in their chest or neck. They will get medications through the catheter to prevent complications. Participants will get stem cells through the catheter. They will stay in the hospital for at least 4 weeks. They will give blood, urine, bone marrow, and stool samples. They may need blood transfusions. They may need more scans. They will take more medications. Participants will have visits on days 30, 60, 100, 180, and 360, and 24 months after the transplant. Then they will have visits once a year for about 5 years
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation as Conditioning Regimen before Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well total marrow and lymphoid irradiation works as a conditioning regimen before hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome or acute leukemia. Total body irradiation can lower the relapse rate but has some fatal side effects such as irreversible damage to normal internal organs and graft-versus-host disease (a complication after transplantation in which donor's immune cells recognize the host as foreign and attack the recipient's tissues). Total body irradiation is a form of radiotherapy that involves irradiating the patient's entire body in an attempt to suppress the immune system, prevent rejection of the transplanted bone marrow and / or stem cells and to wipe out any remaining cancer cells. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a more recently developed method of delivering radiation. Total marrow and lymphoid irradiation is a method of using IMRT to direct radiation to the bone marrow. Total marrow and lymphoid irradiation may allow a greater dose of radiation to be delivered to the bone marrow as a preparative regimen before hematopoietic cell transplant while causing less side effects to normal organs than standard total body irradiation.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Reduce Intensity Conditioning Donor Stem Cell Transplant for the Treatment of Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well a reduced intensity conditioning regimen after donor stem cell transplant works in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back (relapsed). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Daratumumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving a reduced intensity conditioning regimen consisting of cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and daratumumab after donor stem cell transplant may improve survival and reduce the risk of multiple myeloma coming back.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant with Treosulfan, Fludarabine, and Total-Body Irradiation for the Treatment of Hematological Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well a donor stem cell transplant, treosulfan, fludarabine, and total-body irradiation work in treating patients with blood cancers (hematological malignancies). Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Reduced-Intensity Fludarabine, Melphalan, and Total Body Irradiation for the Treatment of Blood Cancer in Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well reduced-intensity fludarabine, melphalan, and total body irradiation work in treating patients with blood cancer who are undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Giving radiation therapy after chemotherapy may kill the remaining cancer cells.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • US Study of UM171-Expanded CB in Patients With High Risk Leukemia / Myelodysplasia

    Cord blood (CB) transplants are an option for patients lacking an HLA identical donor but are hampered by low cell dose, prolonged aplasia and high transplant related mortality. UM171, a novel and potent agonist of hematopoietic stem cell self renewal could solve this major limitation, allowing for CB's important qualities as lower risk of chronic GVHD and relapse to prevail. In a previous trial (NCT02668315), the CB expansion protocol using the ECT-001-CB technology (UM171 molecule) has proven to be technically feasible and safe. UM171 expanded CB was associated with a median neutrophil recovery at day (D)+18 post transplant. Amongst 22 patients who received a single UM171 CB transplant with a median follow-up of 18 months, risk of TRM (5%) and grade 3-4 acute GVHD (10%) were low. There was no moderate-severe chronic GVHD. Thus, overall and progression free survival at 12 months were impressive at 90% and 74%, respectively. The UM171 expansion protocol allowed access to smaller, better HLA matched CBs as >80% of patients received a 6-7 / 8 HLA matched CB. Interestingly there were patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies and multiple comorbidities (5 patients who had already failed an allogeneic transplant and 5 patients with refractory / relapsed acute leukemia / aggressive lymphoma). Despite this high risk population, progression was 20% at 12 months. This new study seeks to test a similar strategy in a group of patients with high risk acute leukemia / myelodysplasia.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Total Body Irradiation and Astatine-211-Labeled BC8-B10 Monoclonal Antibody for the Treatment of Nonmalignant Diseases

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose of total body irradiation with astatine-211 BC8-B10 monoclonal antibody for the treatment of patients with nonmalignant diseases undergoing hematopoietic cell transplant. Radiation therapy uses high energy gamma rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Astatine-211-labeled BC8-B10 monoclonal antibody is a monoclonal antibody, called anti-CD45 monoclonal antibody BC8-B10, linked to a radioactive / toxic agent called astatine 211. Anti-CD45 monoclonal antibody BC8-B10 is attached to CD45 antigen positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers astatine 211 to kill them. Giving astatine-211 BC8-B10 monoclonal antibody and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant may help stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Bendamustine with or without Cyclophosphamide in Preventing GVHD in Patients Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of bendamustine when given with or without cyclophosphamide in preventing graft versus host disease (GVHD) in patients undergoing stem cell transplant. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bendamustine and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy and total body irradiation before or after a stem cell transplant helps kills cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient's bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. Sometimes, the transplanted cells from a donor can attack the body's normal cells called GVHD. Giving tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and filgrastim after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • An Investigational Graft Processing Procedure (ApoGraft) for the Prevention of Acute Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of an investigational graft processing procedure (ApoGraft) in preventing acute graft versus host disease in patients undergoing a stem cell transplant. A stem cell is a type of cell found in the blood or bone marrow which helps form more blood cells. The purpose of a stem cell transplant is to use the stem cells from a healthy donor to replace the diseased bone marrow in the recipient. One of the side effects of a stem cell transplant is the development of graft versus host disease (GVHD). GVHD occurs when some of the cells from the donor attack the recipient’s tissues, resulting in mild, moderate, or even life-threatening side effects to the recipient’s skin, stomach, intestine, and liver. A haploidentical (half-matched related) stem cell transplant is a type of transplant that occurs when the person who needs a transplant can’t find a donor who exactly matches their tissue type (either among family members or through a matched unrelated donor). When no matched donor is available, haploidentical donors may be used. The purpose of this study is to see how well using ApoGraft in processing stem cells works to prevent or lessen the effects of GVHD while still effectively treating the disease in patients receiving a haploidentical stem cell transplant.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Optimizing PTCy Dose and Timing

    Background: Stem cell or bone marrow transplants can cure or control blood cancers. Sometimes the donor cells see the recipient s body as foreign. This can cause complications. A high dose of the drug cyclophosphamide (PTCy) can help reduce these risks. Researchers want to see if a lower dose of PTCy can have the same benefits. Objective: To see if a lower dose of PTCy will help people with blood cancers have a more successful transplant and fewer side effects. Eligibility: People ages 12-65 with leukemia, lymphoma, or multiple myeloma that is not curable with standard therapy and is at high risk of returning without transplant, and their healthy adult relatives Design: Transplant participants will be screened with: Blood, urine, breathing, and heart tests Scans Chest x-ray Bone marrow samples: A needle inserted into the participant s pelvis will remove marrow and a bone fragment. Transplant recipients will stay at the hospital and be prepped with chemotherapy over 6 days for the transplant. They will get stem cells through a catheter in the chest or neck. They will get the cyclophosphamide chemotherapy. They will stay in the hospital about 4 more weeks. They will have blood transfusions. They will have frequent blood tests and 2 bone marrow samples within 1 year after the transplant. Donor participants will be screened with: Blood, urine, and heart tests Chest x-ray Scans Donor participants will have bone marrow taken from their pelvis or stem cells taken from their blood. For the blood donation, blood will be taken from a vein in one arm, move through a machine to remove white blood cells, and be returned through a vein in the other arm. Participation will last up to 5 years....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Peripheral T Cell Lymphoma

    Background: Lymphoma is a type of blood cancer. Blood cell transplant can cure some people with lymphoma. Researchers want to see if they can limit the complications transplant can cause. Objective: To test if a stem cell transplant can cure or control lymphoma. Also to test if new ways of getting a recipient ready for a transplant may result in fewer problems and side effects. Eligibility: Recipients: People ages 12 and older with peripheral T cell lymphoma that does not respond to standard treatments Donors: Healthy people ages 18 and older whose relative has lymphoma Design: Participants will be screened with: Physical exam Blood and urine tests Bone marrow biopsy: A needle inserted into the participant s hip bone will remove marrow. Donors will also be screened with: X-rays Recipients will also be screened with: Lying in scanners that take pictures of the body Tumor sample Donors may donate blood. They will take daily shots for 5 7 days. They will have apheresis: A machine will take blood from one arm and take out their stem cells. The blood will be returned into the other arm. Recipients will be hospitalized at least 2 weeks before transplant. They will get a catheter: A plastic tube will be inserted into a vein in the neck or upper chest. They will get antibody therapy or chemotherapy. Recipients will get the transplant through their catheter. Recipients will stay in the hospital several weeks after transplant. They will get blood transfusions. They will take drugs including chemotherapy for about 2 months. Recipients will have visits 6, 12, 18, 24 months after transplant, then once a year for 5 years. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Itacitinib in Reducing the Incidence of Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Hematologic Cancers Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of itacitinib in reducing the incidence of graft versus host disease (GVHD) in patients with hematologic (bone marrow and blood cells) cancers undergoing donor stem cell transplant. One of the side effects of a donor stem cell transplant is the development of GVHD, which occurs when some of the cells from the donor attack the recipient’s tissues, resulting in mild, moderate, or even life-threatening side effects to the recipient’s skin, stomach, intestine, and liver. Itacitinib may prevent or lessen the effect of GVHD while still effectively treating the hematologic cancer.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • 2-Step Approach to Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well a 2-step approach to stem cell transplant works in treating patients with blood cancers. Giving chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a lymphocyte (white blood cell) and stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. By giving the donor cells in two steps, the dose of lymphocytes given can be tightly controlled and they can be made more tolerant to the body. When the healthy lymphocytes and stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells called graft versus host disease. Giving tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil may stop this from happening.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • 211At-BC8-B10 followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of a radioactive agent linked to an antibody (211At-BC8-B10) followed by donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with high-risk acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that has come back (recurrent) or isn't responding to treatment (refractory). 211At-BC8-B10 is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can attack the body's normal cells, called graft versus host disease. Giving cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate mofetil, and sirolimus after a transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington


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