Clinical Trials Using Nivolumab

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Nivolumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-75 of 396

  • Azacitidine, Entinostat, and Nivolumab or Nivolumab Alone in Treating Patients with Recurrent Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well azacitidine, entinostat, and nivolumab or nivolumab alone work in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer that has come back and has spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Entinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may kill tumor cells that are left after chemotherapy. It is not yet known if azacitidine and entinostat followed by nivolumab or nivolumab alone is more effective in treating non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Nivolumab and Combination Chemotherapy before Surgery for the Treatment of Resectable Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma

    This phase I trial studies how well nivolumab and combination chemotherapy before surgery work in treating patients with pleural malignant mesothelioma that can be removed by surgery (resectable). Nivolumab is a type of medication called an antibody, which is like the proteins made by the immune system to protect the body from harm. Nivolumab blocks the protein PD 1 (programmed cell death receptor 1) that usually acts as a “brake” on the immune system. Blocking this protein is like releasing the brakes, so that the immune system can target cancer cells and destroy them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pemetrexed, cisplatin, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with pleural malignant mesothelioma compared to combination chemotherapy alone.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Nivolumab with or without Linrodostat for the Treatment of Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer or Carcinosarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab alone or in combination with linrodostat works in treating patients with endometrial cancer or carcinosarcoma that has come back (recurrent) or remains despite treatment (persistent). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Linrodostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving nivolumab alone or in combination with linrodostat may be effective in treating patients with recurrent or persistent endometrial cancer or carcinosarcoma.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Immunotherapy (Nivolumab and Ipilimumab) for the Treatment of Aggressive Pituitary Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab and ipilimumab work in treating pituitary tumors that form, grow, or spread quickly (aggressive). Nivolumab blocks the protein PD-1, which can act as a brake on the immune system. Blocking PD-1 releases the brakes, so the immune system can recognize tumor cells and kill them. Ipilimumab acts against a protein called CTLA-4, which can slow down or turn off the immune system. Blocking CTLA-4 allows the body to have an immune reaction that helps destroy tumor cells. The purpose of this study is to find out whether the study drugs, nivolumab and ipilimumab, are an effective treatment for people with pituitary tumors.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Brentuximab Vedotin and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Early Stage Classic Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well brentuximab vedotin and nivolumab work in treating patients with stage I-II classic Hodgkin lymphoma. Brentuximab vedotin is a monoclonal antibody, brentuximab, linked to a toxic agent called vedotin. Brentuximab attaches to CD30 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers vedotin to kill them. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 17 locations

  • A Study of a Personalized Neoantigen Cancer Vaccine

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, dose, immunogenicity and early clinical activity of GRT-C901 and GRT-R902, a personalized neoantigen cancer vaccine, in combination with nivolumab and ipilimumab, in patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer, microsatellite stable colorectal cancer, gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma, and metastatic urothelial cancer.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Nivolumab and Cabozantinib S-malate in Treating Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Kidney Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab and cabozantinib s-malate work in treating patients with kidney cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Cabozantinib s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving nivolumab and cabozantinib s-malate may work better in treating patients with advanced or metastatic kidney cancer.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Combination Immunotherapy (Nivolumab and Ipilimumab) in Treating Patients with CDK12 Loss and Metastatic Prostate Cancer or Other Metastatic Cancers, IMPACT Study

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab and ipilimumab work in treating patients with a type of genetic mutation called CDK12 loss and prostate cancer or other cancers that have spread to other places in the body. Cancer is caused by changes (mutations) to genes that control the way our cells function; especially how they repair mistakes that crop up during regular growth and turnover. The normal proof-reading system in the cells tries to fix the DNA mistakes. CDK12 is part of the body's proof-reading system that fixes mistakes in genetic information. Tumor cells that carry CDK12 loss cannot fix these mistakes well. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. The purpose of this study is to test the effectiveness (how well the drug works), safety, and tolerability of the investigational drug combination of nivolumab plus ipilimumab for metastatic prostate cancer and other cancer types that have mutations of the CDK12 gene making this gene stop working.
    Location: 7 locations

  • A Study of ASP1948, Targeting an Immune Modulatory Receptor, in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the tolerability and safety profile of ASP1948 when administered as a single agent and in combination with nivolumab in participants with locally advanced (unresectable) or metastatic solid tumors; characterize the pharmacokinetic profile of ASP1948 when administered as a single agent and in combination with nivolumab and determine the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of ASP1948 when administered as a single agent and in combination with nivolumab. This study will also evaluate the antitumor effect of ASP1948 when administered as a single agent and in combination with nivolumab.
    Location: 12 locations

  • Nivolumab with or without Ipilimumab before Surgery in Treating Patients with Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab works with or without ipilimumab before surgery in treating patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving nivolumab and ipilimumab before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: 7 locations

  • A Study of Nivolumab or Nivolumab Plus Experimental Medication BMS-986205 With or Without Bacillus Calumette-Guerin (BCG) in BCG Unresponsive Bladder Cancer That Has Not Invaded Into the Muscle Wall of the Bladder

    A study to evaluate Nivolumab or Nivolumab Plus Experimental Medication BMS-986205 with or without BCG in BCG-Unresponsive non-muscle invasive Bladder Cancer
    Location: 11 locations

  • An Investigational Immuno-Therapy Study of Experimental Medication BMS-986253 Given in Combination With Nivolumab in Patients With Advanced Cancers

    The purpose of this study is to investigate experimental medication BMS-986253 in combination with Nivolumab in patients with advanced cancers.
    Location: 8 locations

  • An Investigational Immunotherapy Study of BMS-986249 Alone and in Combination With Nivolumab in Solid Cancers That Are Advanced or Have Spread

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether BMS-986249 both by itself and in combination with Nivolumab is safe and tolerable in the treatment of advanced solid tumors
    Location: 7 locations

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with Advanced Rare Genitourinary Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab and ipilimumab work in treating patients with rare genitourinary tumors that have spread to other anatomic sites or is no longer responding to treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Recurrent Uterine Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab works in treating patients with uterine cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or come back after a period of improvement (recurrent). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with Adenoid Cystic Cancer or Recurrent or Metastatic Salivary Gland Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab and ipilimumab work in treating patients with adenoid cystic cancer or salivary gland cancer that has come back (recurrent) or spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 7 locations

  • A Study Comparing Nivolumab, Nivolumab in Combination With Ipilimumab and Placebo in Participants With Localized Kidney Cancer Who Underwent Surgery to Remove Part of a Kidney

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether nivolmab alone or the combination of nivolumab and ipilimumab versus placebo, is safe and effective for delaying or preventing recurrence of cancer in patients who have experienced partial or entire removal of a kidney
    Location: 9 locations

  • Nivolumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Untreated Stage III-IV Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of nivolumab and combination chemotherapy in treating patients with untreated stage III-IV classical Hodgkin Lymphoma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in combination chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, bleomycin sulfate, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab and more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells and work better at treating Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Phase 2 Study of Glesatinib, Sitravatinib or Mocetinostat in Combination With Nivolumab in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    The study will evaluate the clinical activity of nivolumab in combination with 3 separate investigational agents, glesatinib, sitravatinib, or mocetinostat.
    Location: 9 locations

  • An Open-Label, Dose-Escalation / Dose-Expansion Safety Study of INCB059872 in Subjects With Advanced Malignancies

    This is an open-label, dose-escalation / dose-expansion study of INCB059872 in subjects with advanced malignancies. The study will be conducted in 4 parts. Part 1 (mono therapy dose escalation) will determine the recommended dose(s) of INCB059872 for dose expansion, based on maximum tolerated dose and / or a tolerated pharmacologically active dose. Part 2 (dose expansion) will further determine the safety, tolerability, efficacy, PK, and PD of the selected monotherapy dose(s) in AML / MDS, SCLC, myelofibrosis, Ewing sarcoma, and poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumors. Part 3 will determine the recommended dose(s) of INCB059872 in combination with azacitadine and all-trans retinoic acid in AML and in combination with nivolumab in SCLC. Part 4 will further determine the safety, tolerability, efficacy, PK, and PD of the selected combination dose(s) in Part 3.
    Location: 8 locations

  • A Vaccine (Galinpepimut-S) with Nivolumab for the Treatment of Patients with WT1-Expressing Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of a vaccine, galinpepimut-S, and nivolumab in treating patients with WT1 positive malignant pleural mesothelioma. Vaccines, such as galinpepimut-S, are made from Wilms Tumor Protein 1 (WT1) peptide and may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells that express WT1. Galinpepimut-S is mixed with a substance called montanide, which helps to boost the immune reaction to galinpepimut-S. The mixture of the galinpepimut-S and montanide make up the actual final vaccine that is then given to patients. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may remove signals that block the immune system’s activity, indirectly strengthening the immune system to help fight the cancer. It has been shown that cancer vaccines can sometimes increase these signals that actually block the immune system’s anti-cancer activity. Using a cancer vaccine (galinpepimut-S) directed to mesothelioma cells with a drug that can unblock these negative signals (nivolumab) may help treat malignant pleural mesothelioma.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Study of RP1 Monotherapy and RP1 in Combination With Nivolumab

    RPL-001-16 is a Phase 1 / 2, open label, dose escalation and expansion clinical study of RP1 alone and in combination with nivolumab in adult subjects with advanced and / or refractory solid tumors, to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D), as well as to evaluate preliminary efficacy.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Nivolumab with or without Azacitidine in Treating Patients with Recurrent Resectable Osteosarcoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of azacitidine and how well it works with or without nivolumab in treating patients with osteosarcoma that has come back (recurrent) and can be removed by surgery (resectable). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab and azacitidine together may work better compared to nivolumab alone in treating patients with osteosarcoma.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Ipilimumab and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with High-Risk Ocular Melanoma

    This phase II trial studies how well ipilimumab and nivolumab work in treating patients with high-risk ocular melanoma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the tumor, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Nivolumab with Carboplatin or Oxaliplatin in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well gemcitabine hydrochloride and nivolumab with carboplatin or oxaliplatin work in treating patients with urothelial cancer that has spread from its original site of growth to nearby tissues or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether gemcitabine hydrochloride and nivolumab with carboplatin or oxaliplatin may work better in treating patients with urothelial cancer.
    Location: 6 locations