Clinical Trials Using Oxaliplatin

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Oxaliplatin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 76-98 of 98

  • Talimogene Laherparepvec, Chemotherapy, and Radiation Therapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Rectal Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of talimogene laherparepvec in combination with 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin, capecitabine, and chemoradiation before surgery in treating patients with rectal cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue and lymph nodes. Drugs used in immunotherapy, such as talimogene laherparepvec, may stimulate the body's immune system to fight tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving talimogene laherparepvec, 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine and chemoradiation before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Bevacizumab with the NovoTTF-100L(P) System in Treating Participants with Advanced, Recurrent, or Refractory Hepatic Metastatic Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of combination chemotherapy and bevacizumab, and to see how well they work with the NovoTTF-100L(P) system in treating participants with cancer that has come back or does not respond to treatment and has spread to the liver. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin, fluorouracil, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, and temsirolimus, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. The NovoTTF-100L(P) system is a portable device that uses electrical fields to stop the growth of tumor cells. Giving combination chemotherapy and monoclonal antibody therapy while using the NovoTTF-100L(P) system may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Pembrolizumab, a Monoclonal Antibody Against PD-1, in Combination With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin (CAPOX) in People With Advanced Biliary Tract Carcinoma (BTC)

    Background: Biliary tract cancers are rare but they are serious. Researchers want to see if a certain drug helps the immune system fight cancer cells. The drug is called pembrolizumab. It may work even better with two chemotherapy drugs that are widely used to treat gastrointestinal cancers. Objective: To study if pembrolizumab given with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) increases the time it takes for a person's biliary tract cancer to get worse. Eligibility: People age 18 and older with previously treated biliary tract cancer that has spread to other parts of the body Design: Participants will be screened with tests as part of their regular cancer care. Each study cycle is 3 weeks. For 6 cycles, participants will: Get pembrolizumab and oxaliplatin on day 1 of each cycle. They will be given in an intravenous (IV) catheter. Take capecitabine by mouth for 2 weeks then have 1 week without it. Participants will complete a patient diary. Starting with cycle 7, participants will get only pembrolizumab. They will get it once every 3 weeks. On day 1 of every cycle, participants will have: Physical exam Review of symptoms and how well they do normal activities Blood tests Every 9 weeks, they will have a scan. Participants may have tumor samples taken. Participants will have a final visit about 1 month after they stop the study drug. After that, they will be contacted by phone or email yearly.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • TAS-102 and Oxaliplatin in Treating Patients with Refractory Stage IV Colon or Colorectal Cancer

    This phase IB / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride (TAS-102) when given together with oxaliplatin and to see how well it works in treating patients with stage IV colon or colorectal cancer that does not respond to treatment. TAS-102 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving TAS-102 and oxaliplatin may work better in treating patients with colon or colorectal cancer.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Neoadjuvant GMCI Plus Chemoradiation for Advanced Non-Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate Gene Mediated Cytotoxic Immunotherapy (GMCI™) in combination with standard of care chemoradiation and surgery for borderline resectable and unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer in patients who have completed induction chemotherapy. GMCI kills tumor cells and creates an immune stimulatory environment in the tumor. Killing tumor cells in an immune stimulatory environment induces the body's immune system to detect and destroy cancer cells. GMCI has shown synergy with radiation and surgery without added toxicity. The hypothesis is that GMCI added to standard of care chemoradiation and surgery after completion of induction chemotherapy will be safe and will improve the clinical outcome for patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Personalized Antibodies in Treating Patients with Metastatic Stomach or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    This pilot phase II trial studies personalized antibodies in treating patients with stomach or gastroesophageal junction cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Testing tumor tissue for gene mutations and protein expression patterns and using drugs that target the specific profile of the tumor, may work better than standard chemotherapy in treating patients with stomach or gastroesophageal junction cancer.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Combination Chemotherapy before and after Surgery in Treating Patients with Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy before and after surgery works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving combination chemotherapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. Giving these treatments after surgery may kill any tumor cells that remain after surgery.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Veliparib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of veliparib when given together with combination chemotherapy and to see how well it works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and leucovorin calcium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving veliparib and combination chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia

  • TTX-030 in Combination With Immunotherapy and / or Chemotherapy in Subjects With Advanced Cancers

    This is a phase 1 / 1b study of TTX-030 in combination therapy, an antibody that inhibits CD39 enzymatic activity, leading to accumulation of pro-inflammatory adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and reduction of immunosuppressive adenosine, which may change the tumor microenvironment and promote anti-tumor immune response. This trial will study the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and anti-tumor activity of TTX-030 in combination with immunotherapy and / or standard chemotherapies.
    Location: 2 locations

  • PK,PD,Safety and Tolerability of Multiple Dose Regimens of MT-3724 With Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin for the Treatment of Patients With Relapsed / Refractory Diffuse Large B Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of MT-3724 in combination with gemcitabine and oxaliplatin (GEMOX) in subjects with relapsed or refractory B-Cell NHL.
    Location: UC Irvine Health / Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, Orange, California

  • A Study of DKN-01 in Combination With Tislelizumab ± Chemotherapy in Patients With Gastric or Gastroesophageal Cancer

    A Phase 2a, Multicenter, Open-Label Study of DKN-01 in Combination with Tislelizumab ± Chemotherapy as First-Line or Second-Line Therapy in Adult Patients with Inoperable, Locally Advanced or Metastatic Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma
    Location: 2 locations

  • PIPAC for the Treatment of Peritoneal Carcinomatosis in Patients with Ovarian, Uterine, Colorectal, or Gastric Cancer

    This trial studies the side effects of pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy (PIPAC) in treating patients with ovarian, uterine, stomach (gastric), or colorectal cancer that has spread to the lining of the abdominal cavity (peritoneal carcinomatosis). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, doxorubicin, oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. PIPAC is a minimally invasive procedure that involves the administration of intraperitoneal chemotherapy. The study device consists of a nebulizer (a device that turns liquids into a fine mist), which is connected to a high-pressure injector, and inserted into the abdomen (part of the body that contains the digestive organs) during a laparoscopic procedure (a surgery using small incisions to introduce air and to insert a camera and other other instruments in the abdominal cavity for diagnosis and / or to perform routine surgical procedures). Pressurization of the liquid chemotherapy through the study device results in aerosolization (a fine mist or spray) of the chemotherapy intra-abdominally (into the abdomen). Giving chemotherapy through PIPAC may reduce the amount of chemotherapy needed to achieve acceptable drug concentration, and therefore potentially reduces side effects and toxicities.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Novel Oncology Therapies in Combination With Adjuvant Chemo in High-risk MSS-CRC

    Columbia 2 is a Phase 2 platform study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of standard of care (FOLFOX) alone and in combination with novel oncology therapies in adjuvant high-risk microsatellite-stable colorectal cancer
    Location: 3 locations

  • mFOLFIRNOX Followed by Hepatic Arterial Infusion of Floxuridine and Dexamethasone with Systemic mFOLFIRI for Unresectable Liver-dominant Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    This phase II trial studies the efficacy and safety of systemic induction of mFOLFIRINOX, followed by hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) floxuridine-dexamethasone administered concurrently with systemic mFOLFIRI in treating patients with liver-dominant intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Drugs used in chemotherapy regimens, such as mFOLFIRINOX and mFOLFIRI (Oxaliplatin, Irinotecan, Fluorouracil, Folinic acid, Floxuridine) work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Delivering chemotherapy via HAI (hepatic arterial infusion) can allow for liver-directed treatment while limiting toxic side effects typically seen with traditional chemotherapy.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Magnetic Resonance-Guided Radiation Therapy before Surgery for the Treatment of Stage I-III Gastric Cancer

    This trial studies how well magnetic resonance-guided radiation therapy works before surgery for the treatment of stages I-III gastric cancer. Radiation therapy uses high-energy magnetic fields and radio waves to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Magnetic resonance-guided radiation therapy uses a machine (called the Viewray System) that contains both the device that delivers the radiation and an MRI scanner. This may help the doctors to adjust or re-plan treatment day by day.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Digoxin for the Treatment of Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase IIa trial studies how well neoadjuvant chemotherapy and digoxin work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery (resectable). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, irinotecan, leucovorin calcium, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Digoxin may improve cancer drugs effect and slow tumor growth. Given neoadjuvant chemotherapy and digoxin together may work better in treating patients with resectable pancreatic cancer compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska

  • Nivolumab in Combination with Chemotherapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies how well nivolumab and combination chemotherapy work before surgery in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that could possibly be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, leucovorin calcium and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab in combination with chemotherapy before surgery may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Modified FOLFIRINOX and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Patients with Non-Metastatic Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well the combination of chemotherapy drugs called FOLFIRINOX (levoleucovorin or leucovorin, 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan and oxaliplatin) followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has not spread to other places in the body (non-metastatic) and cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Chemotherapy drugs, such as levoleucovorin or leucovorin, 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a radiation therapy approach which delivers high dose radiation to a tumor in the body in a single treatment session or up to 5 treatment sessions (one dose per day). Giving chemotherapy with stereotactic body radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Combination Chemotherapy, Bevacizumab, and / or Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Deficient DNA Mismatch Repair Metastatic Colorectal Cancer, the COMMIT Study

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and / or atezolizumab work in treating patients with deficient deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and leucovorin calcium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab and atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving combination chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and atezolizumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer.
    Location: 380 locations

  • Veliparib, Pembrolizumab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patient with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well veliparib or pembrolizumab work with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with rectal cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as modified (m)FOLFOX6 regimen, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving veliparib or pembrolizumab with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells, make the tumor smaller, and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: 608 locations

  • Duloxetine to Prevent Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    This phase II / III trial studies the best dose of duloxetine and how well it works in preventing pain, tingling, numbness, and muscle weakness (peripheral neuropathy) caused by treatment with oxaliplatin in patients with stage II-III colorectal cancer. Duloxetine increases the amount of certain chemicals in the brain that help relieve depression and pain. Giving duloxetine in patients undergoing treatment with oxaliplatin for colorectal cancer may help prevent peripheral neuropathy.
    Location: 398 locations

  • Lidocaine Hydrochloride in Preventing Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients with Stage III-IV Colorectal Cancer

    This randomized phase I / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of lidocaine hydrochloride and how well it works in preventing oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy in patients with stage III-IV colorectal cancer. Lidocaine hydrochloride may work by blocking the nerve damaging effects of oxaliplatin.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Dasatinib in Preventing Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients with Stage IV Colorectal Cancer Receiving FOLFOX Regimen and Bevacizumab

    This phase Ib trial studies side effects and best dose of dasatinib in preventing oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy in patients with stage IV colorectal cancer who are receiving FOLFOX regimen and bevacizumab. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as leucovorin, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX regimen), work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. However, the buildup of oxaliplatin in the cranial nerves can result in damage or the nerves. Dasatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Blocking these enzymes may reduce oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio