Clinical Trials Using Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-75 of 85

  • Biologically Optimized Infusion Schedule of Gemcitabine and Nab-Paclitaxel for the Treatment of Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well a biologically optimized infusion schedule of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Altering the timing of the nab-paclitaxel infusion may improve response in patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Lonsurf, Gemcitabine, and Nab-Paclitaxel for the Treatment of Patients with Advanced Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of Lonsurf, gemcitabine, and nab-paclitaxel in treating patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma that has spread from where it first started to nearby tissue, lymph nodes, or distant parts of the body (advanced). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as Lonsurf, gemcitabine, and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Indiana University / Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, Indiana

  • Nab-Paclitaxel + Cisplatin + Gemcitabine in Untreated Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    This is a phase II open-label study evaluating the efficacy and safety of nab-paclitaxel cisplatin, and gemcitabine in patients with metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.
    Location: University of Miami Miller School of Medicine-Sylvester Cancer Center, Miami, Florida

  • Durvalumab in Combination with Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors, (DURVA+ study)

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of durvalumab when given together with chemotherapy in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to others places in the body (advanced). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, capecitabine, carboplatin, paclitaxel, and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy with durvalumab may improve how immune cells respond and attack tumor cells.
    Location: National Cancer Institute Developmental Therapeutics Clinic, Bethesda, Maryland

  • A Study to Determine the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Preliminary Efficacy of ABBV-927 With ABBV-368, Budigalimab (ABBV-181) and / or Chemotherapy in Participants With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    A study evaluating the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics, and preliminary efficacy of ABBV-927 with ABBV-368, Budigalimab (ABBV-181) and / or chemotherapy in participants with selected solid tumors. This study consists of 2 main parts, a dose-escalation phase and a dose-expansion phase. The dose-expansion phase can begin once the recommended phase 2 dose / maximum tolerated dose (RP2D / MTD) is determined in the dose-escalation phase.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Serial Measurements of Molecular and Architectural Responses to Therapy (SMMART) PRIME Trial

    This phase Ib trial determines if samples from a patient’s cancer can be tested to find combinations of drugs that provide clinical benefit for the kind of cancer the patient has. This study is also being done to understand why cancer drugs can stop working and how different cancers in different people respond to different types of therapy.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • M7824 in Combination With Chemotherapy in Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    The main purpose of the study is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of M7824 in combination with chemotherapy.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Study to Evaluate Safety / Tolerability of Immunotherapy Combinations in Participants With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer or Gynecologic Malignancies

    This is a Phase 1 / 1b, open-label, dose-escalation, and dose-expansion study to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamic (PD), and clinical activity of etrumadenant (AB928) in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) with or without IPI-549 in participants with advanced metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) or ovarian cancer, and etrumadenant in combination with nanoparticle albumin-bound-paclitaxel (NP) in participants with advanced metastatic TNBC.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Bemcentinib with Nab-Paclitaxel, Gemcitabine, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase Ib / II trial studies how well bemcentinib in combination with nab-paclitaxel, gemcitabine, and cisplatin work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body or that has come back. Bemcentinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel, gemcitabine, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving bemcentinib with nab-paclitaxel, gemcitabine, and cisplatin may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Testing the Addition of an Individualized Vaccine to Nab-Paclitaxel, Durvalumab and Tremelimumab and Chemotherapy in Patients with Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nab-paclitaxel, durvalumab, and tremelimumab with or without personalized synthetic long peptide vaccine (neoantigen vaccine) works in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Vaccines made from peptides may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known whether giving nab-paclitaxel, durvalumab, and tremelimumab with or without neoantigen vaccine will work better in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: Yale University Cancer Center LAO, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Talimogene Laherparepvec with Chemotherapy or Endocrine Therapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic, Unresectable, or Recurrent HER2- Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase Ib trials studies the side effects and how well talimogene laherparepvec works when given together with chemotherapy or endocrine therapy in treating patients with breast cancer that does not express the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein and has spread to other places in the body (metastatic), cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable), or has come back (recurrent). Biological therapies, such as talimogene laherparepvec, use substances made from living organisms that may attack specific tumor cells and stop them from growing or kill them. Chemotherapy drugs, such as nab-paclitaxel, gemcitabine, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Estrogen can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Drugs used as endocrine therapy, such as letrozole, anastrozole, exemestane, tamoxifen or fulvestrant, may lessen the amount of estrogen made by the body or may may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking estrogen from connecting to the cancer cells. Giving talimogene laherparepvec with chemotherapy or endocrine therapy may work better in treating patients with HER2-negative breast cancer.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • Gemcitabine, Nab-paclitaxel, Capecitabine, Cisplatin, and Irinotecan in Treating Patients with Pancreatic Cancer That Has Spread to Other Places in the Body

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of nab-paclitaxel in combination with gemcitabine, capecitabine, cisplatin, and irinotecan and how well they work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine, nab-paclitaxel, capecitabine, cisplatin, and irinotecan, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • CCR2 / CCR5 Antagonist BMS-813160, Nivolumab, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Nab-Paclitaxel in Treating Patients with Borderline Resectable or Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of CCR2 / CCR5 antagonist BMS-813160, nivolumab, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and nab-paclitaxel and how well they work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be borderline removed by surgery (resectable) or has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). Immunotherapy with CCR2 / CCR5 antagonist BMS-813160, may induce changes in body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride and nab-paclitaxel, may work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving CCR2 / CCR5 antagonist BMS-813160, nivolumab, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and nab-paclitaxel may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, Nab-Paclitaxel, and Hydroxychloroquine Sulfate with or without Avelumab in Treating Participants with Resectable Pancreatic Cancer Before Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well gemcitabine hydrochloride, nab-paclitaxel, and hydroxychloroquine sulfate with or without avelumab work before surgery in treating participants with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, nab-paclitaxel, and hydroxychloroquine sulfate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving gemcitabine hydrochloride, nab-paclitaxel, hydroxychloroquine sulfate and avelumab before surgery may work better in treating participants with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Nab-Paclitaxel and Pembrolizumab in Treating Participants with Recurrent Unresectable Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nab-paclitaxel and pembrolizumab work in treating participants with urothelial cancer that has come back, cannot be removed by surgery, has spread to nearby tissues or lymph nodes or other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving nab-paclitaxel and pembrolizumab may work better in treating participants with urothelial cancer.
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • Atezolizumab with Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Anaplastic or Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab in combination with chemotherapy works in treating patients with anaplastic or poorly differentiated thyroid cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Vemurafenib and cobimetinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs such as nab-paclitaxel and paclitaxel work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This trial is being done to see if atezolizumab in combination with chemotherapy works better in treating patients with anaplastic or poorly differentiated thyroid cancer compared to standard treatments.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Study of Durvalumab + Tremelimumab With Chemotherapy or Durvalumab With Chemotherapy or Chemotherapy Alone for Patients With Lung Cancer (POSEIDON).

    This is a randomized, open-label, multi-center, global, Phase III study to determine the efficacy and safety of durvalumab + tremelimumab combination therapy + Standard of care (SoC) chemotherapy or durvalumab monotherapy + SoC chemotherapy versus SoC chemotherapy alone as first line treatment in patients with metastatic non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with tumors that lack activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusions.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Gemcitabine and Nab-Paclitaxel with or without Pharmacological Ascorbate in Treating Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel with or without pharmacological ascorbate works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Pharmacological ascorbate may change the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known how pharmacological ascorbate will affect the effectiveness of chemotherapy.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Nintedanib Alone followed by Nintedanib, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Nab-paclitaxel in Treating Participants with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    This phase 1b / II trial studies the side effects of nintedanib alone followed by nintedanib, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and nab-paclitaxel in treating participants who have pancreatic adenocarcinoma that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes, or has spread to other places in the body. Nintedanib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nintedanib in combination with gemcitabine hydrochloride and nab-paclitaxel may kill more tumor cells in participants with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma.
    Location: UT Southwestern / Simmons Cancer Center-Dallas, Dallas, Texas

  • Nab-Paclitaxel and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Progressive Small Cell Cancer after First-Line Therapy

    This phase II trial studies how well nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine hydrochloride work in treating patients with small cell cancer that has come back or is growing, spreading, or getting worse after first-line therapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Pembrolizumab and Nab-paclitaxel in Treating Patients with HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of pembrolizumab and nab-paclitaxel and to see how well they work in treating patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor-negative (HER2-negative) breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab and nab-paclitaxel may work better in treating patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer.
    Location: Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone, New York, New York

  • LOAd703 Oncolytic Virus Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    The purpose of this study is to see if LOAd703 (an oncolytic adenovirus) can be safely given to patients with pancreatic cancer. The study will also evaluate whether or not intratumoral injection of LOAd703 will support current standard of care treatment to reduce the size of the tumor and improve survival of the patients. Adenoviruses are known as the "common cold" virus and most individuals have had multiple infections during their lifetime. Oncolytic adenoviruses are adenoviruses that are modified so they cannot multiply and spread (known as replicating) properly in normal (e.g. healthy) cells, but instead, they infect and replicate very well in cancer cells. This strong replication leads to the death of the cancer cell. Oncolytic viruses have been evaluated in multiple clinical trials for cancer treatment during the past decade and been proven safe. It is common to have a fever the first day or two after virus injection since the immune system will react to the virus infection. The immune system can also kill cancer cells but to do so it needs to be properly stimulated. Oncolytic viruses alone do not seem to be strong enough to activate clinically relevant anti-cancer responses. However, it is thought that if additional immune system stimulators are added to the oncolytic viruses they may be able to result in clinical relevant antic-cancer responses. LOAd703 is an oncolytic adenovirus that has been modified to include additional immune system stimulators. Specifically, genes that stimulate the immune system have been added to the oncolytic adenovirus. Once the oncolytic adenovirus infects the cancer cells, the genes will be expressed, resulting in activation of the immune response so it can attack and kill cancer cells. In this study, LOAd703 will be given by intratumoral injections. It will be given in addition to standard of care treatment with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel + / - the anti-PD-L1 antibody atezolizumab. Because this is an experimental therapy, there will be extra visits for disease monitoring and samples accordingly to the detailed information below. The LOAd703 is an investigational agent not approved by the FDA.
    Location: Baylor College of Medicine / Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Nab-Paclitaxel and Atezolizumab before Surgery in Treating Patients with Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nab-paclitaxel and atezolizumab before surgery work in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer (breast cancer cells that do not have estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, or large amounts of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 protein). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving nab-paclitaxel and atezolizumab before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. This drug combination before surgery may be an effective treatment for triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Durvalumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Stage I-III Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of durvalumab when given together with paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cyclophosphamide and to see how well they work in treating patients with stage I-III breast cancer that does not have estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, or large amounts of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)2 / neu protein. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving durvalumab together with paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cyclophosphamide may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, Nab-paclitaxel, and Hypofractionated, Image-Guided, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies neoadjuvant therapy (treatment given as a first step to shrink a tumor before the main treatment) comprising gemcitabine hydrochloride, nab-paclitaxel, and hypofractionated, image-guided, intensity modulated radiation therapy (HIGRT) before surgery in treating patients with newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer that can potentially be removed by surgery. Giving gemcitabine hydrochloride, paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation, and HIGRT before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. HIGRT delivers higher doses of radiation therapy over a shorter period of time and may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects. Giving neoadjuvant gemcitabine hydrochloride and paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation together with HIGRT may be a better treatment for pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina