Clinical Trials Using Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-75 of 77

  • Atezolizumab with Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Anaplastic or Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab in combination with chemotherapy works in treating patients with anaplastic or poorly differentiated thyroid cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Vemurafenib and cobimetinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs such as nab-paclitaxel and paclitaxel work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This trial is being done to see if atezolizumab in combination with chemotherapy works better in treating patients with anaplastic or poorly differentiated thyroid cancer compared to standard treatments.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Multimodality Therapy before and after Surgery in Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well multimodality therapy works before and after surgery in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, nab-paclitaxel, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving carboplatin, nab-paclitaxel, and durvalumab before surgery and using durvalumab with or without radiation therapy and cisplatin after surgery may kill more tumor cells in patients with head and neck cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Carboplatin, Nab-Paclitaxel, and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well carboplatin, nab-paclitaxel, and pembrolizumab work in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer that has spread to the parts of the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving carboplatin, nab-paclitaxel, and pembrolizumab may work better in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Nivolumab, Nab-paclitaxel, and Carboplatin Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Response-Based Locoregional Therapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced HPV-Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab, nab-paclitaxel, and carboplatin induction chemotherapy followed by response-based locoregional therapy works in treating patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Locoregional therapy, such as surgery, radiation therapy, or chemoradiotherapy, may help decrease the side effects associated with treatment. Giving nivolumab, nab-paclitaxel, and carboplatin induction chemotherapy followed by response-based locoregional therapy may work better in treating patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Gemcitabine and Nab-Paclitaxel with or without Pharmacological Ascorbate in Treating Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel with or without pharmacological ascorbate works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Pharmacological ascorbate may change the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known how pharmacological ascorbate will affect the effectiveness of chemotherapy.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Nintedanib Alone followed by Nintedanib, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Nab-paclitaxel in Treating Participants with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    This phase 1b / II trial studies the side effects of nintedanib alone followed by nintedanib, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and nab-paclitaxel in treating participants who have pancreatic adenocarcinoma that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes, or has spread to other places in the body. Nintedanib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nintedanib in combination with gemcitabine hydrochloride and nab-paclitaxel may kill more tumor cells in participants with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma.
    Location: UT Southwestern / Simmons Cancer Center-Dallas, Dallas, Texas

  • Nab-Paclitaxel and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Progressive Small Cell Lung Cancer after First-Line Therapy

    This phase II trial studies how well nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine hydrochloride work in treating patients with small cell lung cancer that has come back or is growing, spreading, or getting worse after first-line therapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Pembrolizumab and Nab-paclitaxel in Treating Patients with HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of pembrolizumab and nab-paclitaxel and to see how well they work in treating patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor-negative (HER2-negative) breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab and nab-paclitaxel may work better in treating patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer.
    Location: Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone, New York, New York

  • Ramucirumab and Nab-Paclitaxel in Treating Patients with Previously Treated Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II clinical trial studies the side effects of ramucirumab and nab-paclitaxel and to see how well they work in treating patients with previously treated stage IV non-small cell lung cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ramucirumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ramucirumab and nab-paclitaxel together may work better in treating patients with previously treated stage IV non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • LOAd703 Oncolytic Virus Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    The purpose of this study is to see if LOAd703 (an oncolytic adenovirus) can be safely given to patients with pancreatic cancer. The study will also evaluate whether or not intratumoral injection of LOAd703 will support current standard of care treatment to reduce the size of the tumor and improve survival of the patients. Adenoviruses are known as the "common cold" virus and most individuals have had multiple infections during their lifetime. Oncolytic adenoviruses are adenoviruses that are modified so they cannot multiply and spread (known as replicating) properly in normal (e.g. healthy) cells, but instead, they infect and replicate very well in cancer cells. This strong replication leads to the death of the cancer cell. Oncolytic viruses have been evaluated in multiple clinical trials for cancer treatment during the past decade and been proven safe. It is common to have a fever the first day or two after virus injection since the immune system will react to the virus infection. The immune system can also kill cancer cells but to do so it needs to be properly stimulated. Oncolytic viruses alone do not seem to be strong enough to activate clinically relevant anti-cancer responses. However, it is thought that if additional immune system stimulators are added to the oncolytic viruses they may be able to result in clinical relevant antic-cancer responses. LOAd703 is an oncolytic adenovirus that has been modified to include additional immune system stimulators. Specifically, genes that stimulate the immune system have been added to the oncolytic adenovirus. Once the oncolytic adenovirus infects the cancer cells, the genes will be expressed, resulting in activation of the immune response so it can attack and kill cancer cells. In this study, LOAd703 will be given by intratumoral injections. It will be given in addition to standard of care treatment with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel. Because LOAd703 is an experimental therapy, there will be extra visits for disease monitoring and samples accordingly to the detailed information below. The LOAd703 is an investigational agent not approved by the FDA.
    Location: Baylor College of Medicine / Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Nab-Paclitaxel and Atezolizumab before Surgery in Treating Patients with Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nab-paclitaxel and atezolizumab before surgery work in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer (breast cancer cells that do not have estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, or large amounts of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 protein). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving nab-paclitaxel and atezolizumab before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. This drug combination before surgery may be an effective treatment for triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Recombinant EphB4-HSA Fusion Protein with Standard Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    This pilot phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of recombinant EphB4-HSA fusion protein when given together with standard chemotherapy regimens in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced) or have spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as recombinant EphB4-HSA fusion protein, paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation, gemcitabine hydrochloride, docetaxel, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether standard chemotherapy regimens are more effective with recombinant ephB4-HSA fusion protein in treating advanced or metastatic solid tumors.
    Location: USC / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Nab-paclitaxel and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride Followed by Radiation Therapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine hydrochloride followed by radiation therapy before surgery work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving nab-paclitaxel, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and radiation therapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, Nab-paclitaxel, and Hypofractionated, Image-Guided, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies neoadjuvant therapy (treatment given as a first step to shrink a tumor before the main treatment) comprising gemcitabine hydrochloride, nab-paclitaxel, and hypofractionated, image-guided, intensity modulated radiation therapy (HIGRT) before surgery in treating patients with newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer that can potentially be removed by surgery. Giving gemcitabine hydrochloride, paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation, and HIGRT before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. HIGRT delivers higher doses of radiation therapy over a shorter period of time and may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects. Giving neoadjuvant gemcitabine hydrochloride and paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation together with HIGRT may be a better treatment for pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Stage IV or Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation and gemcitabine hydrochloride work in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer that is stage IV or has come back (recurrent). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation and gemcitabine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Radiation Therapy and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients with Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of radiation therapy and paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation when given together in treating patients with pancreatic cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays and / or protons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving radiation therapy and paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Nab-Paclitaxel and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients with Unresectable Stage IV Melanoma or Gynecological Cancers

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of nab-paclitaxel and bevacizumab in treating patients with stage IV melanoma that cannot be removed by surgery or with cancer of the cervix, endometrium, ovary, fallopian tube or peritoneal cavity. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving nab-paclitaxel and bevacizumab may kill more tumor cells than nab-paclitaxel alone.
    Location: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Nab-Paclitaxel and Carboplatin Followed by Chemoradiation in Treating Patients with Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of nab-paclitaxel when given together with carboplatin followed by chemoradiation in treating patients with head and neck cancer that has come back (recurrent). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel, carboplatin, fluorouracil, and hydroxyurea, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Giving nab-paclitaxel followed by chemoradiation therapy may be a better treatment for head and neck cancer.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Evaluation of Efficacy and Safety of Neoadjuvant Treatment With Pamrevlumab in Combination With Chemotherapy (Gemcitabine and Nab-paclitaxel) in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    This is a Phase 3, randomized, double-blind trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of neoadjuvant treatment with pamrevlumab or placebo in combination with gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel (G / NP) in the treatment of locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer subjects.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Study of ORIC-101 in Combination With Anticancer Therapy

    The purpose of this study is to establish the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D), safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and preliminary antitumor activity of ORIC-101 in combination with other anticancer therapies when administered to patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • A Study to Assess the Antitumor Activity and Safety of IMAB362 in Combination With Nab-Paclitaxel and Gemcitabine (Nab-P + GEM) as First Line Treatment in Subjects With Claudin 18.2 (CLDN18.2) Positive, Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    The purpose of this study is to confirm the recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) of zolbetuximab in combination with Nab-P + GEM, determine overall survival and assess the safety and tolerability of the combination treatment. This study will also evaluate other anti-tumor effects, tumor markers and pharmacokinetics (PK) of zolbetuximab, Nab-P and GEM.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • RRx-001 in Lung Cancer, Ovarian Cancer and Neuroendocrine Tumors Prior to Re-administration of Platinum Based Doublet Regimens (QUADRUPLE THREAT)

    This study is designed to explore the potential of the epigenetic agent RRx-001 to sensitize patients who previously received and now have failed a platinum based doublet regimen. RRx-001 is administered with autologous blood once weekly followed by or in combination with reintroduction of platinum-based doublet therapy.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Study of Eryaspase in Combination With Chemotherapy Versus Chemotherapy Alone as 2nd-Line Treatment in PDAC

    This is an open-label, multicenter, randomized, Phase 3 study in patients with ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas who have failed only one prior line of systemic anti-cancer therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer and have measurable disease.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Nab-Paclitaxel and Pembrolizumab in Treating Participants with Recurrent Unresectable Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nab-paclitaxel and pembrolizumab work in treating participants with urothelial cancer that has come back, cannot be removed by surgery, has spread to nearby tissues or lymph nodes or other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving nab-paclitaxel and pembrolizumab may work better in treating participants with urothelial cancer.
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • Bispecific Antibody Armed Activated T-cells with Aldesleukin and Sargramostim in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of bispecific antibody armed activated T-cells when given together with aldesleukin and sargramostim and to see how well they work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or other places in the body (metastatic). Bispecific antibody armed activated T-cells are the patient's own T cells that are coated with a bispecific antibody comprising 2 antibodies chemically joined together. These antibodies have specific targets and binding properties that may give the T cells a greater ability to seek out, attach to, and kill more cancer cells.
    Location: Wayne State University / Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, Michigan