Clinical Trials Using Pegfilgrastim

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Pegfilgrastim. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-20 of 20
  • Immunotherapy (Nivolumab or Brentuximab Vedotin) Plus Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Stage III-IV Classic Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This randomized phase III trial compares immunotherapy drugs (nivolumab or brentuximab vedotin) when given with combination chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage III or IV classic Hodgkin lymphoma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Brentuximab vedotin is a monoclonal antibody, brentuximab, linked to a toxic agent called vedotin. Brentuximab attaches to cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers vedotin to kill them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The addition of nivolumab or brentuximab vedotin to combination chemotherapy may shrink the cancer or extend the time without disease symptoms coming back.
    Location: 319 locations

  • Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin in Treating Patients with Invasive Bladder Urothelial Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin work in treating patients with invasive bladder urothelial cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 309 locations

  • Accelerated or Standard BEP Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Intermediate or Poor-Risk Metastatic Germ Cell Tumors

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well an accelerated schedule of bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin (BEP) chemotherapy works compared to the standard schedule of BEP chemotherapy in treating patients with intermediate or poor-risk germ cell tumors that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving BEP chemotherapy on a faster, or “accelerated” schedule may work better with fewer side effects in treating patients with intermediate or poor-risk metastatic germ cell tumors compared to the standard schedule.
    Location: 126 locations

  • Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well standard-dose combination chemotherapy works compared to high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have returned after a period of improvement or did not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Giving colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim or pegfilgrastim, and certain chemotherapy drugs, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant are more effective than standard-dose combination chemotherapy in treating patients with refractory or relapsed germ cell tumors.
    Location: 54 locations

  • Ibrutinib, Rituximab, Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with HIV-Positive Stage II-IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas

    This phase I trial studies the side effect and best dose of ibrutinib in combination with rituximab, etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive stage II-IV diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ibrutinib and etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride may work better in treating patients with HIV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.
    Location: 15 locations

  • Alisertib Alone or in Combination with Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Recurrent, Progressive, or Newly Diagnosed Central Nervous System Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumors or Extra-Central Nervous System Malignant Rhabdoid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well alisertib alone or in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy works in treating younger patients with central nervous system (CNS) atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors that are newly diagnosed; have returned; or are growing, spreading, or getting worse or extra-CNS malignant rhabdoid tumors that have returned or are growing, spreading, or getting worse. Alisertib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking a protein called aurora kinase A that is needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses x-rays to kill tumor cells. Giving alisertib alone or with chemotherapy and radiation therapy may be effective in treating patients with rhabdoid tumors.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Risk Classification Schemes in Identifying Better Treatment Options for Children and Adolescents with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies risk classification schemes in identifying better treatment options for children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Risk factor classification may help identify how strong treatment should be for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Second-Line Pembrolizumab in Combination with Gemcitabine, Vinorelbine, and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well pembrolizumab in combination with gemcitabine, vinorelbine, and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride work in treating patients with Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine, vinorelbine, and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab, gemcitabine, vinorelbine, and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride may work better at treating Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced, Resectable, or Inflammatory Her2 Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with Her2 positive breast cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes, can be removed by surgery, or is inflammatory. Trastuzumab is a form of “targeted therapy” because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body’s immune system. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pertuzumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel, docetaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Proton Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Resectable Pancreatic Cancer, PROTON-PANC Study

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of short-course proton radiation therapy when given together with chemotherapy in treatment patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery (resectable). Radiation therapy uses high energy protons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as leucovorin, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving proton therapy and chemotherapy may work better than chemotherapy alone in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia

  • Low-Intensity Chemotherapy and Blinatumomab in treating Patients with Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well low-intensity chemotherapy and blinatumomab work in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, filgrastim, pegfilgrastim, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, cytarabine and vincristine sulfate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving low-intensity chemotherapy and blinatumomab may work better at treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Venetoclax with Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of venetoclax and how well it works when given with combination chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Venetoclax may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, filgrastim and idarubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving venetoclax together with combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • A Study to Investigate Atezolizumab and Chemotherapy Compared With Placebo and Chemotherapy in the Neoadjuvant Setting in Participants With Early Stage Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This is a global Phase III, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of neoadjuvant treatment with atezolizumab (anti-programmed death-ligand 1 [anti-PD-L1] antibody) and nab-paclitaxel followed by doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (nab-pac-AC), or placebo and nab-pac−AC in participants eligible for surgery with initial clinically assessed triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC).
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Low-Intensity Chemotherapy, Ponatinib and Blinatumomab in Treating Patients with Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive and / or BCR-ABL Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well low-intensity chemotherapy and ponatinib work in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive and / or BCR-ABL positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia that may have come back or is not responding to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine, dexamethasone, methotrexate, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with rituximab and blinatumomab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Ponatinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor helps the bone marrow make recover after treatment. Giving low-intensity chemotherapy, ponatinib, and blinatumomab may work better in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Lymphoblastic Lymphoma, Burkitt Lymphoma / Leukemia, or Double-Hit Lymphoma / Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, lymphoblastic lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma / leukemia, or double-hit lymphoma / leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as clofarabine, etoposide, cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate liposome, dexamethasone and bortezomib, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Carfilzomib, Rituximab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of carfilzomib when given together with rituximab and combination chemotherapy and to see how well they work in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not known if carfilzomib in combination with rituximab and combination chemotherapy is better or worse than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Methylprednisolone, Horse Anti-Thymocyte Globulin, Cyclosporine, Filgrastim, and / or Pegfilgrastim or Pegfilgrastim Biosimilar in Treating Patients with Aplastic Anemia or Low or Intermediate-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase II trial studies methylprednisolone, horse anti-thymocyte globulin, cyclosporine, filgrastim, and / or pegfilgrastim or pegfilgrastim biosimilar in treating patients with aplastic anemia or low or intermediate-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Horse anti-thymocyte globulin is made from horse blood and targets immune cells known as T-lymphocytes. Since T-lymphocytes are believed to be involved in causing low blood counts in aplastic anemia and in some cases of myelodysplastic syndromes, killing these cells may help treat the disease. Methylprednisolone and cyclosporine work to suppress immune cells called lymphocytes. This may help to improve low blood counts in aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. Filgrastim and pegfilgrastim are designed to cause white blood cells to grow. This may help to fight infections and help improve the white blood cell count. Giving methylprednisolone and horse anti-thymocyte globulin together with cyclosporine, filgrastim, and / or pegfilgrastim may be an effective treatment for patients with aplastic anemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Lenalidomide, Rituximab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Diffuse Large Cell or Grade 3A / B Follicular B-Cell Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of lenalidomide when given together with rituximab and combination chemotherapy and to see how well it works in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage II-IV diffuse large cell lymphoma or grade 3 follicular grade B-cell lymphoma. Lenalidomide may help the immune system kill abnormal blood cells or cancer cells and may also prevent the growth of new blood vessels that tumors need to grow. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, bind to a protein on the surface of cancer cells and activate the immune system to kill the cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving lenalidomide together with rituximab and combination chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Copanlisib and Combination Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma or Relapsed Grade 3b Follicular Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of copanlisib when given together with combination chemotherapy (R-GCD) in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory) or grade 3b follicular lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) after 1 prior line of therapy. Copanlisib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as rituximab, gemcitabine, carboplatin, and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving copanlisib together with R-GCD as second line therapy may improve the complete response rate for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or follicular lymphoma.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Chemotherapy with or without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with HER2 Positive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy with or without metformin hydrochloride work in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, carboplatin, trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and pegfilgrastim, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Metformin hydrochloride may prevent or lower risk of breast cancer and decrease cancer cells, lower risk of cancer spreading. It is not yet known whether giving metformin hydrochloride with chemotherapy will work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 6 locations